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Duncan Bannon

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The more you do them the easier they get. I would highly recommend you learn the basic ones, and the more complex ones like lefty D2, thumb F' and such also. But the latter aren't needed, but they really help. Or you will get faster and regret not learning them. IMO just learn all of them now.

Yes, you can get there. It will be more difficult than learning it right though, but if that's your only goal, yes.

By techniques do you mean methods. If so, no, more complex method I would say require better fundamentals (like finger tricks). Hope it helps. Feel free to ask further questions.
 

Conor Chin

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Hi again, so I've become a little more comfortable with finger tricks but I'm finding that even when I'm not using them the cube is unstable in my hand and I am CONSTANTLY making mistakes. How can I fix this? Also, I'm usually getting solves of around 1.20 - 1.30 (PB 1.11), and I've been cubing for about a week and practicing everyday. How can I get my solve time to under 1 min using beginners method?

TLDR; How can I make less mistakes when turning, how can I practice look ahead with beginners method, and howto get solve times under 1 min with beginners method.
 

Duncan Bannon

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How can I make less mistakes when turning
Practice, alot. And go slow, when inserting corner, look for your edge, when inserting edge, look for next corner. Going slow will improve times and also your stableness.

how can I practice look ahead with beginners method
Go slow. Know your algs and insertions (like corner into cross) by heart. You can look to the next step while inserting corner/ or while doing an alg.

and how to get solve times under 1 min with beginners method.
Practice. Know your algs, do them fast, but still looking ahead. And maybe learn some last layer algs. What last layer algs do you know now?
 

Conor Chin

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Practice, alot. And go slow, when inserting corner, look for your edge, when inserting edge, look for next corner. Going slow will improve times and also your stableness.


Go slow. Know your algs and insertions (like corner into cross) by heart. You can look to the next step while inserting corner/ or while doing an alg.


Practice. Know your algs, do them fast, but still looking ahead. And maybe learn some last layer algs. What last layer algs do you know now?
I just memorized the algs on the "How to solve a cube" on the Rubiks website.
 

Conor Chin

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What exactly is CFOP, I understand it’s a way of solving but it seems like there are a lot of different methods within CFOP. I’m still using beginner method and I’m averaging around 1.30. Should I wait before switching? And if I were to switch where do I start!?
 

LeeryLangers

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What exactly is CFOP, I understand it’s a way of solving but it seems like there are a lot of different methods within CFOP. I’m still using beginner method and I’m averaging around 1.30. Should I wait before switching? And if I were to switch where do I start!?
Standard CFOP just follows the CFOP method. You can learn a lot of subsets though, Is that what you mean?

I recommend switching if you think you can. There are a lot of good resources on YouTube. I recommend Jperm for F2L and Paradox Cubing for 4LLL. I can send you these if you can’t find them :)
 

Conor Chin

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Standard CFOP just follows the CFOP method. You can learn a lot of subsets though, Is that what you mean?

I recommend switching if you think you can. There are a lot of good resources on YouTube. I recommend Jperm for F2L and Paradox Cubing for 4LLL. I can send you these if you can’t find them :)
Yeah I’d you could send them that would be great
 

Duncan Bannon

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What exactly is CFOP, I understand it’s a way of solving but it seems like there are a lot of different methods within CFOP. I’m still using beginner method and I’m averaging around 1.30. Should I wait before switching? And if I were to switch where do I start!?
Cfop is a very fast (most WR's have been set with this method) method. It starts with Cross, then Inserting 4 F2l pairs. Orientating the last layer, permuting the last layer. Full CFOP has 73?! (probably wrong, but around there) algs. You can learn 4 look last layer where you orientate the edges then the corners, and permuted corners then edges. That has 13?! algs. Or if you COLL to EPLL, ZBLL + ZBLS. But those are more complex.

You can switch anytime. Check out ROUX method and ZZ, pick the most fun method. If you decide to pick CFOP, learn intuitive F2L, there are lots of tutorials on youtube if you just google it.
 

GenTheThief

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@Conor Chin
https://www.speedsolving.com/forum/threads/beginners-guide-to-choosing-a-speedsolving-method.43471/
This is one of my favorite posts on the entire forum, and it really helped me pick an advanced method (ZZ) that I enjoy.

One thing that will drop your times an insane amount is reducing pauses. If you record yourself, you'll see yourself pausing to look for pieces every couple seconds. Being able to know what to do next while doing some thing (e.g. after cross, know where your next corner is when inserting another) is what will ultimately drop your times. Don't worry about turning fast; worry about turning consistently.
If you search "lookahead rubik's cube" on youtube you should get a bunch of good videos.
 

Tom Joad

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Jun 29, 2016
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If I get my average down to 15.5 can I expect any sub-10 times on my luckiest and fastest solves?
 

Tom Joad

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Jun 29, 2016
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PB single usually is about 55-60% of global. So at 15.5, you could expect maybe a 8.5 single to 9.3 single
You could, yes. I’ve missed out on sub 10 solves to lockups many times and I’m not even globally sub 15.5 :p
Thanks!

This has inspired me to keep at it. I would love a sub-10 single one day. I average 18 seconds when I’m in the zone. My F2L and look ahead are awful, I really think I can take another couple of seconds off my average if I work on these.
 

Aerma

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I'm confused about ZZLL. On the wiki it says that it is "the subset of ZBLL in which two opposite LL edges are correctly permuted", does that mean exactly two are correctly permuted or just at least 2? Like I know ZBLL Sune #7 (on Alg.Db) is a ZZLL case, but is #6 also?
 

Conor Chin

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How can I practice finger tricks? No, I don't need to see the video on how to do them I need to know how I can efficiently practice and get better at them so I can use them in a fluid beginner solve.
 

joshsailscga

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After I learn full PLL and eventually OLL, what subsets are worth learning and in what order should I learn them?
COLL is probably your best bet after OLL+PLL. That's as far as I've gone at this point. As an aside, I recently started playing around with the ZZ method and have been finding it quite fun, thanks to COLL.
 

Sion

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How are these G perms? *I don't recognise G perms by name; Only by the patterns of the cubies.*
 

xyzzy

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How are these G perms? *I don't recognise G perms by name; Only by the patterns of the cubies.*
They're all bad for speedsolving. Antislice moves (L R and L' R') are hard to execute accurately and quickly, and all of these also have a U2 D2 in them (also slow).
 
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