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Awesomesaucer

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2018BALA27
It's not new. It's literally the inverse of R U2 R' U' R U2 L' U R' U' L but with wide R instead of L. And it definitely doesn't warrant a whole new thread.
kinda agree with @PapaSmurf , but thats also cool that you came up with your own alg. I personally find it annoying to do wide moves in solves as i am not that good at it, but, if you maybe refine this, it could be something better, you never know
 

Christopher Mowla

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I came up with an 11 move Jb perm. It's probably marginally slower than the normal one and it's one more move than the optimal one with R U L gen but it goes like this (r' F R F') (r U2 R' U) (R U2 R'). The way it works is you start with a sledgehammer except the first R' is a wide move. Then you do a wide r to fix your middle slice which moves the affected pair to the back. If you just insert the pair immediately with U R', you end up with a sune so if you just cancel directly into the sune with U2 R' U R U2 R' then BOOM J perm. Never seen this anywhere before so I thought it was cool.
It wasn't until I made this revision (i.e., I made decompositions of the algorithms and labelled each v1, v2, etc.) on the PLL wiki page that I realized many of the PLL algorithms listed under a case image are just minor modifications of the same algorithm. You can see under the "J Permutation : b:, for example, that there are 34 listed algorithms, but in fact there were only 10 actually distinct/different algorithms.

So this should be of no coincidence, since people appear to purposely modify a sequence to make it more finger-tricky. But it is also partially the case that people added an algorithm to the wiki that they found, when in fact it was technically the same as another algorithm that was already in the wiki.
 

sqAree

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this could've been mentioned before, but I noticed that if you replace some Rs with wide Rs on J-perm you get an A-perm

R U R' F' R U R' U' R' F R2 U' R' // J-perm
R U R' F' r U R' U' r' F R2 U' R' // A-perm

(I knew of T-perm, but not of J-perm but it makes sense because algs are pretty similar)
It also makes sense when rewriting the resulting alg as [R U R': [F' L F, R']], so basically just a setup to a 3-cycle. And doing Lw instead of L in that comm makes it a block comm resulting in J-perm (a pair 3-cycle without the AUF).
 
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Pretty neat v perm alg that flows really well
I am sure that somebody else has already stated this alg, but I have never really seen it

l' U R' D2 R U' R' D2 F R F' R U2 r' U r U2

I think I am gonna make a video on how to finger trick it well because it is really fast.
 

GAN 356 X

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I found a new Aa Perm! Its just a T perm but instead of R moves you use r moves. hold the headlights to the left and the block on your right. Tell me if it already exists or if I made it up

r U r' U' r' F r2 U' r' U' r U r' F'
 
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