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Oatch

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You might find this thread useful. It gives a comprehensive blurb on each of the 'big 4' (most popular speedsolving methods), all of which are fine choices to progress to from the beginner's method.

Another resource you may also find useful is this index for 3x3 methods on the speedsolving wiki. Be warned some of these may be less viable methods or more experimental than others.
 

AlphaSheep

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Guys I would like something other than the big 4(cfop,roux,petrus,zz).....
Any particular reason? What do you like most about the beginners method you're currently using? What do you like least? Which of the big 4 have you tried? Did you like or dislike anything about them?

In addition to the big 4, the other methods that are worth considering are these 3. There are far fewer resources and tutorials though, so learning them will be much more difficult though.
  • LMCF - a variation of the old corners first methods that were popular in the 80's that's well suited to modern cubes and turning styles. The method is simple to get started with, but has a lot of room for advancing by adding on more and more algorithms.
  • PCMS - Solves four columns around the side first, then fills in the middle bits. Quite easy to learn as a beginner.
  • Heise - involves building squares all over the cube that then magically come together. It's very very difficult to use as a speedsolving method because each step requires careful planning, but it's one of the few methods that requires a genuine understanding of how the pieces move relative to other.
  • SSC - an interesting method that attempts to mimic the way computers solve the cube by orienting then permuting. To the untrained eye, the cube looks like a scrambled mess, then suddenly comes together in the second half of the solve.
Disclaimer: if you're only looking outside of the big 4 because you don't like being mainstream, you'll likely be limiting yourself in the long run. The big 4 are objectively better than the obscure methods.
 

shadowslice e

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Are you totally sure you want *all* methods? Because I can probably list at least 30 and that's still gong to be a far from complete list.
Guys I would like something other than the big 4(cfop,roux,petrus,zz).....
[Shameless plug]You might like to try 42


And before choosing a method you may find this playlist interesting to consider.
[/Shameless plug]
 

Dude Blu

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Will u guys please help me understand the difference between vls,vhls,zbls,mgls and winter variation
 

Aerma

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Will u guys please help me understand the difference between vls,vhls,zbls,mgls and winter variation
VLS is solving OLL while inserting your last slot, it has over 200 algorithms.
VHLS is orienting the edges of the last layer while orienting your last slot if the last pair is solved or 'joinable' (R U R' or L' U' L away from being solved)
ZBLS is the same as VHLS except the last pair doesn't have to be solved or joinable, but it has over 300 algorithms.
MGLS is a method that, like VLS, solves the last pair while solving OLL, but it takes 2 steps and therefore 2 looks, but has significantly fewer algorithms.
Winter Variation solves the corner orientation of the last layer while inserting the last slot if the last slot pieces are already solved.
 

Ninja Mango

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Does anyone have tips for memorizing G Perms? Other than the N Perms, I have full PLL memorized but I'm too daunted to go to them in fear that I will be doing a solve and screw up (it's a g perm after all).
 

DGCubes

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Averages,
I know ao5 is your 3 middle solves and ao12 is your middle 10 solves, but how many solves are counted in an ao50 or ao100?
The middle 90% count, so the top and bottom 5% (rounded) are removed. For an average of 50, this means 44 solves count.

Does anyone have tips for memorizing G Perms? Other than the N Perms, I have full PLL memorized but I'm too daunted to go to them in fear that I will be doing a solve and screw up (it's a g perm after all).
G-perms aren't as bad as everyone says. Take it one at a time; don't try to memorize them all at once. Learn one, then once you get used to it and can recognize it easily, learn another (this could mean waiting days or even weeks between learning them).
 

Duncan Bannon

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It there a thread about 3x3 splits for every time frame? I'm mainly looking for Sub 20,15,10. (For Cfop)


EDIT- On a completely different note would anybody be interested in a "Beginner Guide to picking a speedsolving method" for other events? I could do 2x2. CLL,EG,LBL,Ortega, HD and maybe more.
 

GenTheThief

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It there a thread about 3x3 splits for every time frame? I'm mainly looking for Sub 20,15,10. (For Cfop)
If you use percentages, you don't have to keep recalculating at each level.
Cross - 12%
F2L - 56%
OLL - 19%
PLL - 13%

I think thats about right. I use ZZ, though, so I can't actually test that.

I just did 15 solves checking EOLine, F2L, and LL(ZBLL or COLL/EPLL)
2.3 --- 6.4 --- 3.3 = 12
19% - 53% - 28% = 100%

EDIT- On a completely different note would anybody be interested in a "Beginner Guide to picking a speedsolving method" for other events? I could do 2x2. CLL,EG,LBL,Ortega, HD and maybe more.
I don't think that there are enough methods for other events. For 2x2 at least, everything reaches EG: LBL->Ortega/Varasano->CLL->+EG1->+EG2. Its just a progression for the of number of algs. I don't know enough about what HD is, or how it fits in. Really, the only comparisons are Ortega/Varasano vs Guimond ([and maybe]vs LBL) and EG vs HD.
 
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