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[Help Thread] OLL and PLL Discussion

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I stumbled upon a PLL case where the edges need to be rotated counter-clockwise once, and two corners need to be switched. I can't find any PLL case that works. Please help
A Perm

That's an interesting way of recognising it.

Oh okay. Thanks! But isn't AUF before PLL a thing though?
You AUF before the PLL but it isn't necessary to recognise it
 
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Hello

I am breaking 50 seconds average with a 36 second PB and I found some numbers and my last layer in a whole is a bit slacking, I don't have that high of a TPS since I havent been cubing for that long but my question is if I should drill my 2look OLL and PLL alls or would it better be to drill the alls and learn 1look PLL in the proces. I am asking because you can take 4LLL easily to `sub 30 sec , so should I wait with those alls for when im around that or should I drill them immediately a better earlier then later thing

Thanks in advance
 
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Hi there!

I'm new to this community, and this is my first post.

I use CFOP for 3x3 Rubik's cube and I average around 12-13 seconds. My cross + f2l takes around 6-7 seconds. What I have observed is that most fairly fast speedcubers take less than 4 seconds to complete OLL and PLL. Although they are prefixed algorithms, I tend to take more than 4 seconds (6-7 seconds; sometimes even more than that) because my turning efficiency is probably not that good. I have tried tensioning my cube, but my OLL + PLL time still remains the same.

Can you provide tips to reduce my OLL+PLL times? Thanks!
 
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See which OLL/PLL algs take you longer than two seconds, and look for alternative algs on AlgDb. Sometimes the most popular algs might not be the best fit for your turning style, so it helps to look at more than just the first two options on AlgDb.

If you can execute all/most of them sub-2, that'd mean that you're losing time to recognition, so do loads of last layer drills. csTimer has last-layer-only scrambles, for example.
 
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Hi,
I'm confused as to why there are only 21 combinations to solve PLL.
I know that all combinations can be solved by multiple PLL algorithms but I was wondering if there was a set of algorithms that will solve it in one.
I've never actually needed to use one of the algorithms during a solve but can't see why it couldn't come up.
I'm creating a code to solve this which is why I want it to be able to solve it in a single move and all combinations have to be accounted for.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Edit: Sorry for the lack of clarity.
I'm trying to solve this arrangement:
1550006990621.png
I can solve it using 2-look PLL but can't see how i would do it with 1 as none of the algorithms in the list seem to be able to solve it. If this can't be solved then I'm assuming there must be more but as I can't find any online.
I think there must be something I'm missing but I'm not sure what.
 
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Aerma

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Aerma
I'm sorry, I'm having a bit of trouble understanding what you're asking.
There are 22 possible PLL cases, one of which is being solved, so there are 21 algorithms. However, you can solve any PLL case using just 2 algorithms (any adjacent corner swap such as an A permutation and either 3-cycle of edges, known as the U permutations). You can use combinations of these 2 algorithms to solve any PLL case, which is known as 2-look PLL. 2-look PLL is a slower but easier-to-learn method when compared to 1-look PLL, which is knowing all 21 algorithms.
 
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This post is very confusing, but I'm assuming your question is why there are 21 PLL cases when it seems like it should be much greater (given the number of pieces affected)? If that's what you're asking, it's due to AUFs and symmetry, which also explain why some PLL cases occur more frequently than others. If you want a list of algorithms, here's a good one.
 
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Hi,
I'm confused as to why there are only 21 combinations to solve PLL.
I know that all combinations can be solved by multiple PLL algorithms but I was wondering if there was a set of algorithms that will solve it in one.
I've never actually needed to use one of the algorithms during a solve but can't see why it couldn't come up.
I'm creating a code to solve this which is why I want it to be able to solve it in a single move and all combinations have to be accounted for.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Edit: Sorry for the lack of clarity.
I'm trying to solve this arrangement:
View attachment 10001
I can solve it using 2-look PLL but can't see how i would do it with 1 as none of the algorithms in the list seem to be able to solve it. If this can't be solved then I'm assuming there must be more but as I can't find any online.
I think there must be something I'm missing but I'm not sure what.
That's an A-perm, you just need to set up to it with a U'.
 
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So most people say learn 1 alg everyday or every other day but just learn at your own pace and don’t attach yourself to a fixed schedule.for me I’d just learn one whenever I wanted . As for actual memorization I would carry four algs with me on a piece of paper and memorize it in the morning then check myself throughout the day and I would drill each alg for 1 minute everyday.
 
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I have discovered a previously unlisted PLL case.

At first I thought it was a G Perm, but it is not. It involves cycling the 4 edges and swapping diagonal corners.

W(hite), Y(ellow), R(ed), G(reen), B(lue), O(range)

With F2L completed with white at the bottom, and all yellow at the top (OLL completed), the BR(Y) and OG(Y) corners are correct, but the OB(Y) and RG(Y) corners are swapped. The R, B, O, G (O) edges are cycled such that the G(Y) edge is on the O face, the R(Y) edge is on the G face, The B(Y) edge is on the R face, and the O(Y) edge is on the B face.

The position can be obtained by starting with a solved cube with yellow on top and orange in front and performing Ua Perm followed by a Y Perm. It can also be obtained by starting from a solved cube with yellow on top and green in front and performing 3 Y Perms with successive faces front: green, then red then blue.

Would it be presumptuous to suggest the name Phi Perm because the complete cycle of edges plus the diagonal swap would look like the Greek capital letter Phi (turned 45 degrees)?
 
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Nilsibert
I have discovered a previously unlisted PLL case.

At first I thought it was a G Perm, but it is not. It involves cycling the 4 edges and swapping diagonal corners.

W(hite), Y(ellow), R(ed), G(reen), B(lue), O(range)

With F2L completed with white at the bottom, and all yellow at the top (OLL completed), the BR(Y) and OG(Y) corners are correct, but the OB(Y) and RG(Y) corners are swapped. The R, B, O, G (O) edges are cycled such that the G(Y) edge is on the O face, the R(Y) edge is on the G face, The B(Y) edge is on the R face, and the O(Y) edge is on the B face.

The position can be obtained by starting with a solved cube with yellow on top and orange in front and performing Ua Perm followed by a Y Perm. It can also be obtained by starting from a solved cube with yellow on top and green in front and performing 3 Y Perms with successive faces front: green, then red then blue.

Would it be presumptuous to suggest the name Phi Perm (for the as yet undetermined algorithm) because the complete cycle of edges plus the diagonal swap would look like the Greek capital letter Phi (turned 45 degrees)?
That‘s just a Y perm?
 
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You might want to check out the E perm ;)
The usual alg for it is x' (R U' R') D (R U R') D' (R U R') D (R U' R') D'
 
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