• Welcome to the Speedsolving.com, home of the web's largest puzzle community!
    You are currently viewing our forum as a guest which gives you limited access to join discussions and access our other features.

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community of 35,000+ people from around the world today!

    If you are already a member, simply login to hide this message and begin participating in the community!

ProStar

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2019
Messages
4,248
Location
An uncolonized sector of the planet Mars
WCA
2020MAHO01
I really struggle with recoging the slash pi CMLLs for some reason. Of course its really easy to tell at a glance you have a slash case, but for me seeing which one it is and AUFing quickly is hard.
If you're using Kian's normal algs, then try moving the slash so it's top is on the right, then look where the headlights are. The AUF will already be done, so you can just do the alg
 

Etotheipi

Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2019
Messages
860
Location
somewhere on the complex plane.
If you're using Kian's normal algs, then try moving the slash so it's top is on the right, then look where the headlights are. The AUF will already be done, so you can just do the alg
Your late lol I found a method that works. I usee to use that method but it didn't work very well. And aren't I the one who first told you that recog method?
 

Athefre

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2006
Messages
952
Location
0, 0, 0
How to Use Non-Matching Blocks in a Roux Speedsolve

Below is my method for using non-matching blocks. Roux users still don't use this move saving technique. Not because it saves just a few moves and really lucky cases are rare. It is for three reasons - corner recognition, EO recognition, and aligning the left and right layer at the end of the solve. I will show that all three of those aren't actually issues and there are simple and fast ways to accomplish this.

First Block:

This will be the same as every other solve - solve your first block. If you are color neutral in some way, even better. Find the easiest first block within the inspection time.

Second Block:

1x2x2: Now you can take advantage of the lucky cases that you see. Even better, you don't have to be constrained to forming a block that matches the one on the left. It gives a sense of freedom to simply pick whatever you see and just solve. You may have even had time during inspection to plan at least part of the 1x2x2 if you saw an easy case.

Last Pair: Now that a 1x2x2 is formed, you have two options for the next pair. In a solve where you are required to match the two 1x2x3 blocks, you wouldn't get to take advantage of the other pair option if you noticed that it is easier.

EO Preparation: This is the important part for LSE EO. During the second block, track the UR edge and note its location. You will have even more time to track the UR edge during CMLL. At the end, when aligning the second block, use r or r' to align the centers so that they match the block on the left. Because you now know where the UR edge is, after CMLL you can proceed with EO with no issues. You can also choose to track the UL edge instead and orient centers to match the right side block. This center orientation can also be done during the performance of the CMLL algorithm.

CMLL:

I have developed two corner recognition methods for non-matching corners.

Method 1 (Fastest): The best way to recognize corners is using a method I developed based on L/R colors. First, you find the orientation of the colors that match the left and right side of your cube. Then you look at pre-determined spots for matching colors. This is just as fast as the recognition Roux users currently use for matching blocks. This recognition method works equally well for matching and non-matching blocks. Below is a link to the recognition method and algorithms.

NMCMLL

Method 2 (Slower): An alternate solution is to continue to use U color recognition. You find the orientation of the colors that should be on the U layer, then check pre-determined spots for a pattern.

To locate the U layer colors, it helps to pay attention to the blocks that you have built. If you have an orange block on the left with white on the D layer, two of the U layer corners will need to have yellow on the U layer and they both will have orange colors. The block on the right will work the same way, the other two U layer corners will contain two sets of matching colors based on the block. It may help to start predicting orientation while finishing the second block. Now that you see your orientation, you can check the pattern. This will work mostly the same as usual. There are a few rules to remember.

1. L/R colors in the pattern will be recognized as normal. Orange and Red will always be opposite for example.
2. If your blocks are an R/R' away, any F/B colors in the pattern will match the status of the two 1x2x3 blocks. If the left block has blue on the front and the right block has white on the front, then those two colors will be considered matching colors. That also means green and yellow will be matching colors. Then blue and yellow will be opposite and green and white will be opposite.
3. If your blocks are an R2 away, those F/B colors in the pattern will be the opposite from usual. Two blues will be considered opposite and a blue and green will be considered matching.

Once you've chosen one of the above recognition methods, perform the algorithm. During this algorithm, you can continue to track the UR (or UL) edge as described in the second block step.

LSE:

Now that you know where the UR (or UL) edge is, EO will be exactly the same as normal. There will be no recognition problems. For 4c, there are some additional tricks that will be useful for aligning L and R at the end. Below are some examples of the many possibilities.

r U2 M' U2 r
r U2 M U2
r' U2 M' U2
r u2 M' u2 (versus r' U2 M U2 r2 or M U2 M U2 r2 R')
 
Last edited:
Joined
Aug 26, 2017
Messages
89
Hello! How I average around 15 with roux, and one of my biggest struggles is first block. If i can find a pre-made 1x1x2 pair, I can usually figure out a good and efficient solution for the entire block, which often gets me good times. On the contrary, however, whenever I have a scramble which has no 1x1x2 blocks, I usually cant cannot figure out a good first block solution (solution ends up being 11+ moves), and as a result, I end up getting terrible times (17s+).

Any help would be greatly appreciated :)
 

Rainger

Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
Messages
72
Hello! How I average around 15 with roux, and one of my biggest struggles is first block. If i can find a pre-made 1x1x2 pair, I can usually figure out a good and efficient solution for the entire block, which often gets me good times. On the contrary, however, whenever I have a scramble which has no 1x1x2 blocks, I usually cant cannot figure out a good first block solution (solution ends up being 11+ moves), and as a result, I end up getting terrible times (17s+).

Any help would be greatly appreciated :)
I’m having the same issue but double your time haha
 

Rainger

Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
Messages
72
How to Use Non-Matching Blocks in a Roux Speedsolve

Below is my method for using non-matching blocks. Roux users still don't use this move saving technique. Not because it saves just a few moves and really lucky cases are rare. It is for three reasons - corner recognition, EO recognition, and aligning the left and right layer at the end of the solve. I will show that all three of those aren't actually issues and there are simple and fast ways to accomplish this.

First Block:

This will be the same as every other solve - solve your first block. If you are color neutral in some way, even better. Find the easiest first block within the inspection time.

Second Block:

1x2x2: Now you can take advantage of the lucky cases that you see. Even better, you don't have to be constrained to forming a block that matches the one on the left. It gives a sense of freedom to simply pick whatever you see and just solve. You may have even had time during inspection to plan at least part of the 1x2x2 if you saw an easy case.

Last Pair: Now that a 1x2x2 is formed, you have two options for the next pair. In a solve where you are required to match the two 1x2x3 blocks, you wouldn't get to take advantage of the other pair option if you noticed that it is easier.

EO Preparation: This is the important part for LSE EO. During the second block, track the UR edge and note its location. You will have even more time to track the UR edge during CMLL. At the end, when aligning the second block, use r or r' to align the centers so that they match the block on the left. Because you now know where the UR edge is, after CMLL you can proceed with EO with no issues. You can also choose to track the UL edge instead and orient centers to match the right side block. This center orientation can also be done during the performance of the CMLL algorithm.

CMLL:

I have developed two corner recognition methods for non-matching corners.

Method 1 (Fastest): The best way to recognize corners is using a method I developed based on L/R colors. First, you find the orientation of the colors that match the left and right side of your cube. Then you look at pre-determined spots for matching colors. This is just as fast as the recognition Roux users currently use for matching blocks. This recognition method works equally well for matching and non-matching blocks. Below is a link to this recognition method.

NMCLL

Method 2 (Slower): An alternate solution is to continue to use U color recognition. You find the orientation of the colors that should be on the U layer, then check pre-determined spots for a pattern.

To locate the U layer colors, it helps to pay attention to the blocks that you have built. If you have an orange block on the left with white on the D layer, two of the U layer corners will need to have yellow on the U layer and they both will have orange colors. The block on the right will work the same way, the other two U layer corners will contain two sets of matching colors based on the block. It may help to start predicting orientation while finishing the second block. Now that you see your orientation, you can check the pattern. This will work mostly the same as usual. There are a few rules to remember.

1. L/R colors in the pattern will be recognized as normal. Orange and Red will always be opposite for example.
2. If your blocks are an R/R' away, any F/B colors in the pattern will match the status of the two 1x2x3 blocks. If the left block has blue on the front and the right block has white on the front, then those two colors will be considered matching colors. That also means green and yellow will be matching colors. Then blue and yellow will be opposite and green and white will be opposite.
3. If your blocks are an R2 away, those F/B colors in the pattern will be the opposite from usual. Two blues will be considered opposite and a blue and green will be considered matching.

Once you've chosen one of the above recognition methods, perform the algorithm. During this algorithm, you can continue to track the UR (or UL) edge as described in the second block step.

LSE:

Now that you know where the UR (or UL) edge is, EO will be exactly the same as normal. There will be no recognition problems. For 4c, there are some additional tricks that will be useful for aligning L and R at the end. Below are some examples of the many possibilities.

r U2 M' U2 r
r U2 M U2
r' U2 M' U2
r u2 M' u2 (versus r' U2 M U2 r2 or M U2 M U2 r2 R')
I would really like to see a video of all this. It makes a lot of sense but will reach less rouxers sitting here in the forums. Awesome work.
 
Top