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Older cubers discussions

EngiNerdBrian

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2018
Messages
397
Location
Denver
How old is really a relative question, ask a 15 year old and they will tell you are old, I'm 49 and you are young. I think the important thing is at age 29 you are still very capable to learn and get good at things quicker than someone in their 60's. Elegant/efficient solves are not to be undervalued, watching someone smoothly solve a 3x3 in the low 20's without a rotation or pause is a thing of beauty.
What's the J perm clip you refer to, I would like to see it?
I agree it's relative, i was just collecting opinions on what this community considers "old." From a general life perspective i still feel very young at 29 but in this community it feels old. Below is the J-Perm video i was talking about, i think it was discussed a few pages back right as i was beginning to be active on the forum again.

Also, i ditched Facebook a few months ago and i love it. I take issue with how social media has impacted the human condition over the last decade and I'm happy to be breaking free from that environment and internet habits. I do enjoy forums still, the OG social media! I do hope we can keep up some discussion in this thread as an community of older cubers.
 

openseas

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2015
Messages
415
WCA
2015PARK24
I agree it's relative, i was just collecting opinions on what this community considers "old." From a general life perspective i still feel very young at 29 but in this community it feels old. Below is the J-Perm video i was talking about, i think it was discussed a few pages back right as i was beginning to be active on the forum again.

Also, i ditched Facebook a few months ago and i love it. I take issue with how social media has impacted the human condition over the last decade and I'm happy to be breaking free from that environment and internet habits. I do enjoy forums still, the OG social media! I do hope we can keep up some discussion in this thread as an community of older cubers.
I suspected old cubers from J-perm's video (old vs young) were more like 20-30-ish old not senior old since most of us here didn't agree with him. Looks like that is the case.
 

Oldmancfop

Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Messages
49
Out of curiosity why do other older cubers solve?
I was an original 80's cuber, I remember seeing a clip of the first world championships on the news and being astounded by a 22 second solve! When my son turned 12 one of his gifts was a genuine Rubiks cube, I found some clips online of speedcubers to show him and could not believe what I was seeing, 5 seconds, WHAT! I had a fond sense of nostalgia toward the cube and was curious of the method used by the young speedcubers so set my self the challenge, would I be able to properly learn cfop at 50. No expectations beyond learning the method and perhaps breaking a minute. In the process I discovered that cubing is hugely satisfying and addictive. Now I can't put it down, ridiculous really, age 50 and devoting far too much time to a children's toy.
I would be curious to to hear the stories of other older cubers.
 

bossel

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2019
Messages
23
Location
South East of France
Similar here, I learnt the cube back in the 80's on the school yard. Then it got somehow forgotten in a vitrine, and only last June I started looking into it again. Learnt CFOP, knowing all the algs by now, although a misturn can happen here and there... I wouldn't say it's a childrens toy, although you can use it as one. For me it's a portable brain and finger trainer :)
 

Old Tom

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2014
Messages
186
Location
Virginia
WCA
2018DOYL02
The discovery of this thread was an oasis for me when I was just getting started and it'll always have a place in my heart. I still keep an eye on the activity here and plan to continue to do so.
This thread was astonishingly helpful for me when I stumbled on it about three years ago. Until that I had been just a lone LBL solver, since way back in the 80s. I was nudged by many in this group to do F2L, and then, huge step, blind solving. Had almost daily advice for a month while I learned that. Also "Spartan Sailor" mentored me at a comp in Fredericksburg, VA, and I got an official (but dreadfully slow) average on the 3x3. Had an unplanned and forced break for a year, but now back at it. I'm 81, so forget "relatively", I am old.
 

GAN 356 X

Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2019
Messages
1,396
Location
Somewhere in the cubing universe
This thread was astonishingly helpful for me when I stumbled on it about three years ago. Until that I had been just a lone LBL solver, since way back in the 80s. I was nudged by many in this group to do F2L, and then, huge step, blind solving. Had almost daily advice for a month while I learned that. Also "Spartan Sailor" mentored me at a comp in Fredericksburg, VA, and I got an official (but dreadfully slow) average on the 3x3. Had an unplanned and forced break for a year, but now back at it. I'm 81, so forget "relatively", I am old.
Wow, I am 13 and haven't learnt blind because I don't have the commitment to do so!
 

Oldmancfop

Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Messages
49
Attempting 3x3 blind solving is tempting, I have looked into it briefly before, there were lots of T perms and alphabetic labelling of the cube. Are there various methods for blind solving and if so what is the most popular/fastest?
 

EngiNerdBrian

Premium Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2018
Messages
397
Location
Denver
Attempting 3x3 blind solving is tempting, I have looked into it briefly before, there were lots of T perms and alphabetic labelling of the cube. Are there various methods for blind solving and if so what is the most popular/fastest?
Hey Tom, the “Old Pochmann” method is what I first used and sounds like the method you may have come across before which utilizes lots of T perms. I’d recommend that Method to first time blind solvers.

Keep in mind you can name the stickers in the cube anything you like and I definitely did that when I first started, for some reason I didn’t want to have corners and edges with the same letter so I came up with my own more intuitive naming convention. I will switch to a different naming convention as i return to blind solving however.
 

openseas

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2015
Messages
415
WCA
2015PARK24
Attempting 3x3 blind solving is tempting, I have looked into it briefly before, there were lots of T perms and alphabetic labelling of the cube. Are there various methods for blind solving and if so what is the most popular/fastest?
Most popular
in terms of speed : 3 style
in terms of easiness: OP
Intermediate: M2/OP, eka, Orozoco
 

One Wheel

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2016
Messages
2,668
Location
Wisconsin
WCA
2016BAIR04
Attempting 3x3 blind solving is tempting, I have looked into it briefly before, there were lots of T perms and alphabetic labelling of the cube. Are there various methods for blind solving and if so what is the most popular/fastest?
I personally recommend M2/OP. OP is a modified Y-perm for corners, M2 is much faster than OP edges and with the exception of M-slice targets entirely intuitive.
 

Old Tom

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2014
Messages
186
Location
Virginia
WCA
2018DOYL02
Attempting 3x3 blind solving is tempting, I have looked into it briefly before, there were lots of T perms and alphabetic labelling of the cube. Are there various methods for blind solving and if so what is the most popular/fastest?
I can tell you what’s the easiest: the Old Pochman method, but it is slow. However, you only need five algorithms to do it. Three actually, but five is more efficient. It is a piece by piece method which is why it is slow, but also why it is relatively easy.
 

AbsoRuud

Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2018
Messages
1,028
Location
Lelystad, Flevoland, The Netherlands
WCA
2019POLL04
YouTube
Visit Channel
I can tell you what’s the easiest: the Old Pochman method, but it is slow. However, you only need five algorithms to do it. Three actually, but five is more efficient. It is a piece by piece method which is why it is slow, but also why it is relatively easy.
Which 5 do you use? I only need 4.
 

PetrusQuber

Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2019
Messages
2,763
Location
my house, cubing.
YouTube
Visit Channel
I can tell you what’s the easiest: the Old Pochman method, but it is slow. However, you only need five algorithms to do it. Three actually, but five is more efficient. It is a piece by piece method which is why it is slow, but also why it is relatively easy.
Which 5 do you use? I only need 4.
Isn’t it just T, Y, Ja and Jb?
 

narusite

Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2019
Messages
19
When I learned OP, I think I used T for edges, Y for corner, and a parity algorithm (?) Yes, Ja/Jb may help you, but if you want a "minimum" of speed, you won't use that. Anyway, here is the reference link.
Once you get the gist, you should go to M2/OP.
 
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