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One-Answer WCA Competition and Regulations Question Thread

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If they do that you can tell them to fix it before you sign
Yes, you can, if you take 10 seconds to think about how the score taker would see the writing. It would be pretty easy for a judge to write a 4 that looks kinda like a 9, enough that the score taker would have to enter it as a 9 but enough like a 4 still that the competitor would sign it without thinking twice. I agree that competitors, myself included, should be careful signing a scorecard, but I think that if we just say "Whatever is on the scorecard is final, period" it makes the WCA database significantly less accurate.

Imagine that as soon as a competitor and a judge sign a scorecard, it cannot be changed. Then what? Let's say I get a non-cuber friend to go to a competition with me and be a judge. I tell them in secret to subtract 5 seconds from every time I get on the 3x3 that they judge. No one can prove that it wasn't just an honest mistake, that the 9.98 was accidentally written as a 4.98. The judge can't be punished by the WDC as they are a non-cuber. The 4.98 has to go into the database, and boom, I'm third in the world by barely getting a sub-10.
 
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Just make sure it's clearly a 4 before you sign. It's really not difficult for someone smart enough to solve a cube.
Of course the competitor should be careful, but I don't see why we can't correct times that are supposed to be correct. Again, if we decided that the time on a scorecard is automatically final, then it's super easy to cheat.
 

BLTWitch

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When do I need to arrive at a competition? For example, I don't have any events until 12:30pm on the first day, however the competition technically starts at 8am. Is it okay to arrive just before what I'm participating in? Or should I be there at 8am?
 

Kit Clement

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When do I need to arrive at a competition? For example, I don't have any events until 12:30pm on the first day, however the competition technically starts at 8am. Is it okay to arrive just before what I'm participating in? Or should I be there at 8am?
For Oregon 2016 specifically (and most competitions in general) you only have to show up for when you are competing. We'll have a check in table for everyone before 3x3 gets started -- I'd aim to get to the venue at least 15 minutes in advance of the beginning of your first event.
 

kake123

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Also wanted to know that during MBLD memorising phase can you request the stopwatch timer to be beside you to keep track of time?

I saw in Gianfranco's recent 26/26 video, the stopwatch timer was beside him.
 

Kit Clement

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Also wanted to know that during MBLD memorising phase can you request the stopwatch timer to be beside you to keep track of time?

I saw in Gianfranco's recent 26/26 video, the stopwatch timer was beside him.
Since you can see your stackmat basically any other event, I have always placed the stopwatch close in vision of the competitor for their ability to track time. The regulations don't really say anything on this definitively either way.
 

Ranzha

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Just make sure it's clearly a 4 before you sign. It's really not difficult for someone smart enough to solve a cube.
There are people who can solve a cube but don't know how to write. Try again.

What happens too is that if I request my time to be rewritten (e.g. if there's a penalty), then there are disgusting crossings-out and small, less legible rewriting that goes on the scorecard due to a lack of remaining space to write the result. What do you suggest we do in those cases?

(Of course judges should know the regs about how to account for penalties during scoretaking and do it legibly, but that's not what happens.)
 
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My suggested policy would just be that what's signed on the scorecard is the official result unless a) it is obviously off in the benefit of the competitor, e.g. my previous example about a 9.98 becoming a 4.98, or if a digit seems mostly like a better thing (i.e. a 2) but is slightly ambiguous, it must be initially changed to a 7 but then allow competitors to request for such times to be fixed.
 

mark49152

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There are people who can solve a cube but don't know how to write. Try again.
The competitor doesn't write, they read. If they can't read a 4 on the score card, how do they know it's a 4 they see on the timer? If they are genuinely unable to validate that their time has been recorded correctly, for example because of visual impairment, they could ask someone they trust to check it for them.

What happens too is that if I request my time to be rewritten (e.g. if there's a penalty), then there are disgusting crossings-out and small, less legible rewriting that goes on the scorecard due to a lack of remaining space to write the result. What do you suggest we do in those cases?
It should be written legibly. Always, no matter how small. Otherwise it should not be signed.

In general, spirit and common sense should prevail over the letter of the regs. If the score taker can't read a score, ask a second opinion. Preferably the judge if they can be identified. If the score is genuinely illegible by multiple people then the guidelines for how to interpret it are reasonable.
 
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