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Cubing on youtube is over with COPPA

GenTheThief

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So... If I don't make videos for money and I don't care whether people comment on them or not, can I just mark my videos as 'for kids' and move on with my life?
That seems to be the case.

I think the big problem is that the videos are not searchable and wont be recommended to other people.


But I don't know how people will find the videos if you can't search for them.
 

Mike Hughey

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In that case, in the words of one YouTuber, I'll just have to 'adult my videos up' and mark them as not for kids. Sure, they won't be advertiser friendly, but at least they'll be open to searches, comments and playlist addition.
Does "adulting your videos up" really protect you, or are you still liable due to using colorful images (cubes) that can attract kids? It looked to me like that might make you liable, even if you have other kid-inappropriate content.
 

Xtreme Cuber

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I read through the thread here and there are a lot of misunderstandings and unanswered questions about what is going on with the FTC and their implementation of COPPA. Here's an eleven-minute video by a lawyer and YouTuber who has spoken specifically with the FTC and gives, in my opinion, a clear and objective explanation about the situation. The main problems with the FTC's implementation of the rule are 1) It directly goes against the original intent of COPPA, which was to allow parents to have more control over their children's privacy online, 2) It doesn't matter whether your content is directed towards children, only whether the FTC determines that it is appealing to children (music, video games, cartoon characters, sports, stories, toys, fantasy, pets, and snack food are all listed as appealing), 3) It is an unconstitutionally vague interpretation of the law that is primarily backed by competitors to companies that would be harmed by the new implementation, and 4) The FTC is entitled to fine content creators $42,000 for each MISLABELED video. In other words, if you say it isn't for kids and it is, you CAN get fined $42,530 per video.

This IS a problem and must be addressed. It will affect more than just the cubing community on youtube by the time 2020 rolls around.

Anyway, here's the video: (WARNING–he very briefly mentions a more mature topic when introducing why COPPA was created.)

In addition, from the FTC's website, here are the criteria used to determine whether content is appealing (the most applicable part is appendix B). Granted, this section is about determining if websites are appealing to kids, but the exact same criteria are used for youtube videos and the like:
 
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Sion

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The more I think about it, the less it seems like they are going after large creators, and the more it looks like they are specifically targeting the content farms that produce "elsagate" material.

For all of you who don't know what elsagate is, it's basically content on Youtube that is very cartoonish and seemingly directed towards children. That said, it is also unusually graphic and depicts material that is far from age appropriate (graphic depictions of surgery, relationship issues that extend all the way to affairs and paternity disputes, and even depictions of numerous types of assault.) I mind you, this is using characters that are familiar to children, such as Spiderman, Elsa, Mickey and Minnie mouse among others while lively, jumpy music that would appeal to kids plays in the background.


The new guideline, if enforced appropriately, might significantly cut down on the number of these videos due to massive cuts in monetization. That said, if enforced in a way everyone is implying, the results can and will be disastrous for the platform.

PS: If you don't know what elsagate is still, First off, I *don't* recommend watching it. However, if you still don't want to heed this warning, looking up "elsa mickey mouse spiderman" should yield results. I warn you though, it will make you sick to how people can make content like this for kids.


EDIT: I am aware youtube made an attempt to get rid of elsagate content back in August 2017, though there are still massive amounts of it on Youtube as we speak. Given that this material looks like it is targeted to children (and probably is), but is not age appropriate, this could solve a major issue on youtube in regards to kids content.
 
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Iwannaganx

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I don't really know much about what's going on, I did watch like half of matpats video on it, and from my limited knowledge, it's just that YouTube has a big mouth. He goes into a lot of detail, I won't, but basically in interviews they've said things that are just bragging about how many kid watch their videos, EVEN THOUGH you aren't allowed to get a Google account if you are under 13, so that means permission, however implicit, from their parents and therefore is not in violation of COPPA.
BUT then comes yt and their big mouth bragging how many kids they get watching their vids, and COPPA has evidence to do what they've now done.
 

GAN 356 X

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I don't really know much about what's going on, I did watch like half of matpats video on it, and from my limited knowledge, it's just that YouTube has a big mouth. He goes into a lot of detail, I won't, but basically in interviews they've said things that are just bragging about how many kid watch their videos, EVEN THOUGH you aren't allowed to get a Google account if you are under 13, so that means permission, however implicit, from their parents and therefore is not in violation of COPPA.
BUT then comes yt and their big mouth bragging how many kids they get watching their vids, and COPPA has evidence to do what they've now done.
I'm just surprised you posted something lol. but I do agree
 
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Hm true.
I’m on the fence because COPPA has lots of pros and cons.
The fact that it is protecting children from elsagate and likewise, like you said, is a good action, but for adults, (and cubers, hence the thread) it poses some inconvenience.
Let’s just wait till they implement it and see how it goes.
 

Xtreme Cuber

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So you dislike disallowing people to collect, use and share children’s personal information? Seems legit
The FTC's new implementation of the rule is directly in contrast to COPPA's original intent, just FYI. The purpose of COPPA was to give more control to parents over their own children's personal info. However, this new rule takes away that control. Watch the video I posted before. It explains it all.
 

Xtreme Cuber

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COPPA overall is a good and necessary act. It's the way YouTube is enforcing it that makes us unhappy.
As I said before, it's not YouTube's fault. It's the FTC's implementation of the rule which makes us unhappy, and since they are the only ones who have the legal authority to change the way COPPA is carried out, that interpretation will become the new rule. It really doesn't matter whether the original COPPA was a good thing, because it's here to stay. We should be focusing on whether the new changes to COPPA are good and necessary, something I would disagree with.
 

Mike Hughey

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As I said before, it's not YouTube's fault.
I'm not sure I completely agree with this. Clearly all the FTC cares about is whether or not the information is gathered on kids. It seems to me that YouTube could find a middle ground in terms of how they treat videos marked for kids. It seems they're still allowed to do contextualized ads, but not personalized ads. It seems almost like YouTube has adopted the policy of completely eliminating monetization, not recommending kids videos, and making them hard to search specifically to try to force the FTC to give way to complaints about the policy.
 

Xtreme Cuber

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It seems to me that YouTube could find a middle ground in terms of how they treat videos marked for kids. It seems they're still allowed to do contextualized ads, but not personalized ads. It seems almost like YouTube has adopted the policy of completely eliminating monetization, not recommending kids videos, and making them hard to search specifically to try to force the FTC to give way to complaints about the policy.
You're absolutely right. I guess I should have said it's not entirely YouTube's fault. A lot of the blame can still go on the FTC, because of their new interpretation of the law. Obviously, the FTC isn't forcing YouTube to do exactly what they're doing, but if the FTC hadn't edited COPPA in the first place, YouTube wouldn't have felt as if they needed to change their own policies. In other words, there isn't one single scapegoat for all the problems surrounding COPPA, but if the FTC doesn't change their interpretation of the law then YouTube won't feel the need to change. It's sort of a domino effect, if that makes sense.
 

Bamboo Cuber

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So I haven't read all of these (cuz its four pages long and I'm rly tired), but here are my thoughts.
People like JR and CrazyBad will have to figure out other ways to make money because their main source of income is from their channels. The problem with COPPA is that the judgment of whether a video is kid-friendly or not is up to the FTC (or so I've been told). They have ZERO experience when it comes to managing a HUGE media platform like Youtube, and they are also very outdated in terms of law enforcement. I honestly think that when the FTC hits some channels but not others, the backlash will be enormous.
Back to Cubing, the channels that are primarily cubing will be hit very hard, as almost ALL of the videos are considered for Kids. Keep in mind that estimates place Personalised Ads make up approx. 70 - 80% of monetization. We can only hold our breath and cross our fingers for what's to come.
 
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