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Cubing on youtube is over with COPPA

Xtreme Cuber

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It seems to me that YouTube could find a middle ground in terms of how they treat videos marked for kids. It seems they're still allowed to do contextualized ads, but not personalized ads. It seems almost like YouTube has adopted the policy of completely eliminating monetization, not recommending kids videos, and making them hard to search specifically to try to force the FTC to give way to complaints about the policy.
You're absolutely right. I guess I should have said it's not entirely YouTube's fault. A lot of the blame can still go on the FTC, because of their new interpretation of the law. Obviously, the FTC isn't forcing YouTube to do exactly what they're doing, but if the FTC hadn't edited COPPA in the first place, YouTube wouldn't have felt as if they needed to change their own policies. In other words, there isn't one single scapegoat for all the problems surrounding COPPA, but if the FTC doesn't change their interpretation of the law then YouTube won't feel the need to change. It's sort of a domino effect, if that makes sense.
 

Bamboo Cuber

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So I haven't read all of these (cuz its four pages long and I'm rly tired), but here are my thoughts.
People like JR and CrazyBad will have to figure out other ways to make money because their main source of income is from their channels. The problem with COPPA is that the judgment of whether a video is kid-friendly or not is up to the FTC (or so I've been told). They have ZERO experience when it comes to managing a HUGE media platform like Youtube, and they are also very outdated in terms of law enforcement. I honestly think that when the FTC hits some channels but not others, the backlash will be enormous.
Back to Cubing, the channels that are primarily cubing will be hit very hard, as almost ALL of the videos are considered for Kids. Keep in mind that estimates place Personalised Ads make up approx. 70 - 80% of monetization. We can only hold our breath and cross our fingers for what's to come.
 

Tony Fisher

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What I don't get is why you can be fined 40k for labeling something kids might like "not for kids" that doesn't harm anyone, its just like, in a terrible analogy of mine, if a apple seller got sued for not putting "dairy free" on his apples.
Because if you label it not for kids advertisers will be allowed to show interest based targeted ads. The new law prohibits that for "kids" since they are seen as vulnerable and impressionable. Comments would also be allowed so once again the kids would see those oh so dangerous naughty words.
 

Tony Fisher

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1) COPPA is not a group or person. "COPPA" isn't doing anything to anyone. COPPA is the name of an American law aimed at protecting the privacy of children under 13. It has been in effect for nearly 20 years. Google and Youtube have been violating the law for a long, long time and are finally falling into line. It is a law with a valid, important purpose and not at all "stupid".
I would consider it extremely stupid. We are not talking about privacy in terms of photos, medical records, where they hide their pocket money or even their address. We are talking about their browsing habits, general location, sex and age estimations with zero serious consequences. Parents or the kids themselves worried can get 100% privacy from not going online. This nanny state law should be ditched and a simple warning put up instead. Even the ridiculous EU hasn't gone this far.......yet and they even hate the way you wash your chicken!
 

Tabe

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Because if you label it not for kids advertisers will be allowed to show interest based targeted ads. The new law prohibits that for "kids" since they are seen as vulnerable and impressionable. Comments would also be allowed so once again the kids would see those oh so dangerous naughty words.
The issue with comments is not naughty words. The comments section is used for child trafficking and predatory behavior.
 

TNL Cubing

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Soooooo much misunderstanding up above, so let me see if I can clear some stuff up:

1) COPPA is not a group or person. "COPPA" isn't doing anything to anyone. COPPA is the name of an American law aimed at protecting the privacy of children under 13. It has been in effect for nearly 20 years. Google and Youtube have been violating the law for a long, long time and are finally falling into line. It is a law with a valid, important purpose and not at all "stupid".

2) You will not get fined if you mark your content as "not for kids" and it ends up being for kids. If you have a cubing channel and mark it as "not for kids", you're good to go. The problem arises if you mark it "ok for kids" and then publish content that isn't OK for kids. That's where the $42,500 fines come from. Even then, the likelihood of actually getting hit with the fine is really, really small. Mostly what will happen is that Youtube, through their AI, will automatically flag you video as not for kids and that will be that.

3) The disabling of comments on videos for kids is not to protect from bullying. Well, that's maybe 1% of it. The main purpose is to stop the comment sections of videos from being used by predators seeking victims. Currently, the comment sections at Youtube are a haven for gross behavior of that nature.

4) The main effect of this law will be a reduction in ad revenue for a lot of channels. A major effect of COPPA is to make targeted advertising impossible for many demographics. This is because, before the enforcement of the COPPA law, advertisers were (illegally) using the private information of children under 13 (like browsing history, internet searches, etc) to deliver personalized ads. That won't happen anymore. So the ads displayed will be much more generic and, therefore, far less valuable. So, less ad money for channels that are monetised.

For the most part, this is going to be much ado about nothing. There will still be tons of cubing channels putting out content.
I was going to say a couple of those points too, thanks for clearing that up for everyone!

COPPA is definitely a valid law, and YouTube really has no choice but to enforce it the best they can or else they are in deep **** (pardon my french). It's a wonder how they have been violating it and selling data for so long.

Most cubing content isn't targeted specifically at children (as many of the previous replies have also said), so I think everyone just needs to take a step back and chill. Your channels with 50 subscribers aren't even monetised anyway...
 

TNL Cubing

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I would consider it extremely stupid. We are not talking about privacy in terms of photos, medical records, where they hide their pocket money or even their address. We are talking about their browsing habits, general location, sex and age estimations with zero serious consequences. Parents or the kids themselves worried can get 100% privacy from not going online. This nanny state law should be ditched and a simple warning put up instead. Even the ridiculous EU hasn't gone this far.......yet and they even hate the way you wash your chicken!
From what I understand, knowingly collecting information - even that with "zero serious consequences" - of a child under 13 is illegal in some form as is directly marketing and showing ads to a youth (based off of their tracked information) because they are considered by law not mature enough to distinguish advertising.
 

Xtreme Cuber

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COPPA is definitely a valid law, and YouTube really has no choice but to enforce it the best they can or else they are in deep **** (pardon my french). It's a wonder how they have been violating it and selling data for so long.

Most cubing content isn't targeted specifically at children (as many of the previous replies have also said), so I think everyone just needs to take a step back and chill. Your channels with 50 subscribers aren't even monetised anyway...
You're right that YouTube has no choice, but the FTC does have a choice as to how they are interpreting the law, and the way they are doing it is currently directly against the original intent of COPPA. The upcoming change isn't just making YouTube follows the law, it's an entirely different approach to COPPA. Also, whether or not cubing content is specifically targeted at children, the FTC can still fine you for mislabeling your content. In other words, if they say it is appealing to children and you didn't label it as for kids, you can get fined $42,530.

As a side note, I'm not really sure how much this thread has actually cleared things up, especially considering all the contradicting information that's here. If you want an objective and comprehensive view on the subject, read the publication directly from the FTC. It should clear up any questions you still have. :)
 

Mike Hughey

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If you want an objective and comprehensive view on the subject, read the publication directly from the FTC. It should clear up any questions you still have. :)
I don't think it does. I still don't know enough to identify whether my content will be considered to be targeting kids. And that's simply because the FTC's official guidelines are far too vague for anyone to know whether any content is going to be considered to be targeting kids. We can make assumptions about what seems sensible or logical, but that's not necessarily how things work in the legal realm.

And it makes me sad that I have to worry about this even though I'm not monetizing. I have yet to see anything that says content creators are off the hook just because they don't monetize - whether or not you're monetizing, it's still true that if you created content that gets tracked, you're liable. I would go through and mark all my videos as for kids right now, just to be safe, but I hate to lose the comments on my old videos (which I assume will probably be wiped away as soon as I mark them as being for kids).
 

Xtreme Cuber

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I don't think it does. I still don't know enough to identify whether my content will be considered to be targeting kids. And that's simply because the FTC's official guidelines are far too vague for anyone to know whether any content is going to be considered to be targeting kids. We can make assumptions about what seems sensible or logical, but that's not necessarily how things work in the legal realm.
I guess I should have rephrased that. What I meant is that the arguments about the facts here can all be answered if you just read the document. However, I do completely agree with you. The actual workings of the "New COPPA" (e.g. whether you will be fined for not labeling something as for kids if they think it is) can all be found in the publication, though. And if it's not outlined there in black and white, then it's fair game for the FTC to interpret any way they want.
 
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