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[Help Thread] Algorithm Memorization Discussion

Joined
Apr 2, 2017
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I'm trying out using some personalized move letters so that my algorithms sound more like words. I wanted to take better advantage of my verbal memory in memorizing algs, and also to eliminate the problem of forgetting a prime. Has anyone tried something like this? I'm liking it so far.

As an example, I was memorizing Ortega for 2x2x2 yesterday.

My 7 OLL cases: rusuros, roseres, asir ures, ruse sari, tosot, rotetetor, fruseg
My 5 PBL cases: ruse sat eser usi, rese heru suy, rerysus, tyt, tetohet

As I practiced these, I babbled the pseudo-words under my breath and it made memo a lot smoother for me. I also found it pretty hilarious to babble my solves out loud to the non-cuber friend I was with. :)

Here's my code, with vowels placed so that they usually alternate with consonants given my solving style:

U U' U2 = u e o
R R' R2 = r s t
F F' F2 = f g h (also a i y, whichever sounds better)
L L' L2 = l k j
B B' B2 = b c p
D D' D2 = d v w
M M' M2 = m n z

By the way, I'm not suggesting that we communicate with each other using anything but the standard notation. This is for personal memo. People who use a lot of wide or slice moves won't like my code choices; they should probably tweak their own personal code to suit.

What do you think? Have you tried or seen anything similar? I've seen the BLD memo approaches, but that's all I found, so I thought I'd share this before I really commit to it. Thanks for any thoughts!
 

tx789

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Ugh algos sounds weird but whatever
I think algo is the more used abrivation for algorithm(outside cubing).



For memorising algs using words is not the best since you want to get to a state of seeing the case and then starting the alg with no active thinking about what alg to use. Breaking it down into small pieces (triggers) and remembering the alg as being made up of those is better.
 
Joined
Jul 26, 2017
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Hi, I've been cubing for a while now and although I don't always time my solves I've managed to get a PB of 32 seconds using intuitive F2L and beginners last layer. I've decided to venture into learning 4-Look-Last-Layer and I personally find the memorization of all the algorithms rather intimidating, mainly because I don't really have a good memory :/ . If anyone could offer help in ways to memorize these algorithms better, or how long it would normally take somebody to memorize them. All help is appreciated.
 

JCubes

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Aug 3, 2017
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I'd say that before memorizing all the 42 algorithmic f2ls, you should probably memorize keyhole, it gives a better transition from beginner or intuitive f2l to advanced cfop. Keyhole is when you do the cross, solve 3 corners, and use the last corner to insert edges with R U' R' or L' U L. Once you have all the edges inserted, you use one of 3 algorithms to insert the last corner into its correct spot. I currently average 20-22 seconds using keyhole f2l, 2-look oll and 1-look pll.

Resources:
Full keyhole tutorial (without last corner algs):
Last corner algs I use:

(R U R' U')3

U' R U' R' U2 R U' R'

U R U R' U2 R U R'

Of course, you can also get cases where the corner is twisted in the D layer. In that case, you could just do one of the algorithms above, and then get a case you know.
 

DGCubes

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I'd say that before memorizing all the 42 algorithmic f2ls, you should probably memorize keyhole, it gives a better transition from beginner or intuitive f2l to advanced cfop. Keyhole is when you do the cross, solve 3 corners, and use the last corner to insert edges with R U' R' or L' U L. Once you have all the edges inserted, you use one of 3 algorithms to insert the last corner into its correct spot. I currently average 20-22 seconds using keyhole f2l, 2-look oll and 1-look pll.

Resources:
Full keyhole tutorial (without last corner algs):
Last corner algs I use:

(R U R' U')x3

U' R U' R' U2 R U' R'

U R U R' U2 R U R'

Of course, you can also get cases where the corner is twisted in the D layer. In that case, you could just do one of the algorithms above, and then get a case you know.
While I agree that Keyhole is a great intermediate method that can be very helpful for certain F2L cases, it seems that he is past that point. Learning all the F2L algs is not something I'd ever recommend; intuitive F2L is basically the best method.

As far as memorizing algs for the last layer, just try to take it one at a time. Instead of looking at an intimidating set of fourteen algs, look at it as one alg a day for two weeks. Even if it takes you a week to learn an alg though, it's still better than nothing. :)
 
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Thanks for the help from both of you, I think I'm gonna go ahead and follow what DG said personally and start learning them slowly. Nice vids btw!
 
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If you actually look at the algs there are triggers in it. Just remember these triggers and you can peform many more algs. Triggers like sexy move, inverse sexy, sledge and hedge. There are tons. Do not worry though because practising one per day can help drill it efficiently!
 

Zoggy_Cuber

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Aug 2, 2017
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If you actually look at the algs there are triggers in it. Just remember these triggers and you can peform many more algs.
Along the same lines, it may help you to write brackets to distinguish the triggers from each other. That way, you can memorize the algorithm in say, 3 separate 4-move triggers instead of twelve individual moves that you must remember.

For example, here is an algorithm that you most likely use for solving the cross on the top face: F R U R' U' F'

When I first learned this algorithm when I was learning Beginner's Method, I broke it down like this: (F R U) (R' U' F'). This made sense to me because I was simultaneously learning the alg that goes with this one in Beginner's Method: F U R U' R' F' and I broke that one down like this: (F U R) (U' R' F'). As I continued to cube and learn new algs, I realized that it made much more sense to think of that first alg like this: F (R U R' U') F' because the R U R' U' trigger is so common and can be executed quickly with some practice.

Aside from that, I would suggest simply drilling the alg until it is in your muscle memory. That way, instead of thinking through all the separate turns or triggers in your head, your hands sort of just know the algorithm. When you learn a new alg, drill it one or two hundred times. It sounds like a lot, but trust me, it doesn't take as long as you would expect and it will most likely help you a lot with remembering your algs.

My final piece of advice is to not try to cram algs in at once. I am not sure exactly how many algs are used in 4 look LL, but as far as I know, there are somewhere in between 10 and 20. Even if you only learn one every two days and simply drill it over and over in that time, you will know all the algs in about a month.

Happy Cubing :)
 

Duncan Bannon

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There are several different tutorials on this. A few good ones are Colorful Pockets video, and Cyothekings Video. Why did you buy algs??? I’m not the best alg learner in the world by any means. A few different ways I do it are. Break down into triggers or moves + different alg. Track a f2l pair. For 2x2 algs I just do it over and over till its my muscle memory. Hope it helps!
 
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