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Cubers you should have heard of

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#23
You should add Sebastien Felix, creator of multi-slotting, or at least the first one to have a big list of those algorithms on the net.
 

Mike Hughey

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#24
Some perhaps controversial people who might be good to add to the list:
Marcus Stuhr
Gaetan Guimond

And I think Guus should probably be on it too, although I see he got an honorable mention in the discussion about Zbigniew Zborowski.

And by the way, I think this was a great idea for a post! It should be required reading for everyone on the forum.
 
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Thread starter #27
For anyone who's into 4x4x4: Michael Fung and Yuki Hayashi?

I was kinda inpsired by them (as well as Chris Hardwick and Erik Akkersdijk)... :)
Fung and Hayashi just didn't make the cut. Yes, they were fast, but not totally dominating the events for a long time.

Jess Bonde
Frank Morris
Dror Vomberg
Jess just did one competition, he got the WR single but that's it as fas as I know. I don't know if he contributed otherwise.

Frank Morris came up in the discussion. But if we take him, we should also take Badie and perhaps also Beest.

Dror could be on the list. Write a couple of lines about him if you want to.

Richard Carr, early blindcubing legend... first to blindsolve 4x4x4, 5x5x5, onehanded, relays...
I was thinking about him. But I didn't know enough. And the current methods aren't really based on his ideas? So in that sense his not as important. But of course he inspire people. If you feel like he should be on the list you can write a couple of lines and I will add them to the first post.

Some of these cubers are new to me.
Very intresting. This is you're third post in this thread, and your posts just keeps getting less intressting.

Read the introduction?

You should add Sebastien Felix, creator of multi-slotting, or at least the first one to have a big list of those algorithms on the net.
He was in there for a while. He once had 13.00 average at home when the second fastest had 13.88. Multi slotting is not that big of method?

Some perhaps controversial people who might be good to add to the list:
Marcus Stuhr
Gaetan Guimond

And I think Guus should probably be on it too, although I see he got an honorable mention in the discussion about Zbigniew Zborowski.

And by the way, I think this was a great idea for a post! It should be required reading for everyone on the forum.
Thanks Mike. We were thinking about Guimond but decided to cut him. Didn't know what to write, he's such a strange man. And about Marcus Stuhr, he never did compete. He was REALLY fast. But didn't influence the community enough? And Guus, you're right. He could be there. Great FMC'er, but so is Per and Mirek, but he also competed in the first WC, which makes him a bit more interesting. We've tried to keep the list short. But I can be persuaded.

Richard Carr, early blindcubing legend... first to blindsolve 4x4x4, 5x5x5, onehanded, relays...
John White?
There's someone I've missed, who is he?
 
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Lucas Garron

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#33
Heh, some of these "you must include X" are hilarious.

Anyhow, I think Frank Morris definitely deserves a mention. For quite a while around 2005-2007, he was the definition of fast for big cubes. He and Clancy made bigcubes.com, which, despite the introduction of AvG, is the canonical foundation of modern big cube solving.
 
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