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Comparisions Between Cubes

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Hello,

...
Chinese DIYs (cube4you, 9spuzzles)
Pros: Cuts corners well, turns easily, indentations in center caps cause them to fall out less frequently.
Cons: High shipping costs, performance varies between type and cube color.
Where to buy: www.cube4you.com, www.9spuzzles.com, www.opticubes.com, eBay (puzzleproz)
Notes: Comes in three different types: (a), (b), and (c). Some cubes only available in certain types. Many colors to choose from. White and green cubes turn best, as well as some transparent cubes (WARNING: transparent cubes are NOT competition-legal)
...
you say performance varies between type and color and recommend white, green and transparent cubes. when you say white you mean that porcelain white or normal white? (I checked their website [C4U] and was thinking of getting a white one, based on this review, but then I saw they have two white flavors and got confused wondering whether they would differ) so, which of those white ones are you recommending here?
thanks in advance and sorry if it's a silly question.
 
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Nice reviews, but missing Meffert's 4x4x4, v5-7, Diansheng 3x3x3 and types D and F. I say this because I don't have much knowledge of experience about types of cubes and I'm sure that many others are in the same boat as me, and it would be nice to have info on more brands. Also, you might want to go into more detail about the types of DIY letters.
 
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Nice reviews, but missing Meffert's 4x4x4, v5-7, Diansheng 3x3x3 and types D and F. I say this because I don't have much knowledge of experience about types of cubes and I'm sure that many others are in the same boat as me, and it would be nice to have info on more brands. Also, you might want to go into more detail about the types of DIY letters.
I know why you would say that, but keep in mind that this thread was made in 2007, last edited in July of 2008. He hasn't kept things up to date with the new cubes that have come out.
 
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Thread starter #144
If anyone has reviews on any cube not mentioned in the original post or the in the other stickied thread, feel free to link to them or post them here (in this thread), or alternatively, PM me and I'll add them where appropriate.
 

cmhardw

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Hi everyone,

I wanted to post a review about the cube4you gray type C, because I haven't felt this strongly about a cube in a long time, and it feels great to be excited about my cube again.

I've been a pretty die hard C4Y black type A cuber for a long time now. I guess you can say I'm trying to be Andrew Kang's disciple in terms of how I build my cube. I try to pretty much model my cube after Andrew Kang in terms of tension, black type A obviously, and silicone lube technique and amount.

I recently bought 2 gray type C's just for shits and grins, and I've fallen in love. I only built one of them, and so far this is one of the best cubes I have ever owned. It is lighter than the type A, but not as light as the type F. I pop my type F like there's gonna be no tomorrow, so I rarely use that cube. I do still pop the Type C on occasion, but I feel that is because I am getting used to the differences between it and the type A.

Some reason why I like the Type C much better than the type A.
1) As long as you are accurate with your turns, you can really fly on the turning speed.
2) It is lighter, and feels "easier" to turn
3) It feels more stable than the Type A when turning very quickly.

Now some comments on my turning style, and why I feel type C is a much better cube than the type A for this style:

I tend to go for super smooth solving instead of fast turning speed during F2L. My goal for F2L is to get through without any pauses, even if that means turning slower than my maximum. On my type C, even when I get very fast solves, I feel like I am turning the sides at 75-80% max speed during F2L.

For LL the type C is stable when going fast as long as you turn accurately. I am turning the LL at 90-95% speed, and the cube holds up very well as long as I am accurate.

My type A's tend to be very locky and some of them are extremely unforgiving when cutting corners. I feel the type C is as well, but it doesn't "feel" locky. The type C will just pop when pushed too far, but my type A's usually start to lock up, and when pushed harder they pop.

Right now I use my lockiest type A as training on my turning accuracy as warm ups for taking averages on my type C.

So far I have broken my pb single on my type C, after only 2 days of use! My pb on the black type A was 9.83 and my new pb with my gray type C is 9.27. I feel like I am on the verge of breaking my pb average with this type C once I really learn to get used to the feel of it. I feel like, when using my type A, that my pb average is always a difficult feat to achieve and a long way off. When using my type C, my perception is that I might break my pb average within the next couple weeks.

So anyway, I used to be a die hard black type A fan, and I am very quickly turning into a type C convert. I want to try other type C colors to see if there is a difference, but so far the gray type C is one of the best cubes I have ever owned, and I've been speedcubing about 11 years now.

Chris
 
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One cube that you guys might want to try is the Ga-To cube. It's a polish cube. Quality doesn't vary much, and they're basically DIYS. Screw Spring structure, really good plastic, and if anything breaks you can use your broken DIYS. Cuts corners well (mine does). I'll post some pics soon. They cost ~10 Polish Zloty, so do the currency exchange. If you're in Canada or the states they're real cheap. I'm currently breaking mine in right now.

Just my 2 cents. The Polish Speedsolving Community also use them alot for custom puzzles. I'll post more when I'm done breaking the cube in.


Here's where you can look at them

http://allegro.pl/search.php?sg=0&string=ga-to

and

http://magiccube.eu/go/_info/?user_id=22&lang=pl
 
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http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Speed-Rubik...in_0?hash=item27a9cce323&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

New Professional 3X3X3 Ghost Hand Rubik's Cube Slick Speed

Features:

Improve children's spacial imagination and strategic ideation While playing, it is quite natural that you become frustrated, disappointed...

* 100% Brand new.
* 3x3x3
* Cubeoctahedron with 6 colors PVC stickers Rare
* Fully assembled and lubricated at factory, making it extra smooth for faster sloving times.

Package:

1X 5.5 cm Ghost Hand Cube

Hmm...
 
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Thanks!!! You should have talked about the different diys individually because they all are different. But this really helped me out. Thanks!
 
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I don't know why we keep making new threads about cubes when we have this thread.

Anyway, just got the Type A2 and Taiyan. First, Taiyan is kind of like an improved Edison. It is big and bulky. It does move faster and cut corners better but it feels much like the Edison and the Haiyan regular (not the good one) had a baby. It feels like it might come apart and the pieces all jiggle around when you are moving fast, not nearly as bad as the Haiyan though. I would rate it above either an Edison or a Haiyan, but below an A2 or F2. Maybe slightly less than a Ghosthand. I'm not sure who might like this kind of cube. If you want something that feels like a cross between a storebought and a Type A, then this might be for you. At first I thought it was gonna be just like a storebought, but after you lube the cube it does improve quite a bit.

The type A2 was good right out of the plastic wrapping. It feels like a mini type C except clicky. It does feel smaller than other cubes. I think it's the perfect size since I thought the mini C was a little too small to go to competition with. There was a little roughness to it before I lubed it. Lubing it made it slightly faster and not rough at all. I get similar times on this to my F2. I tried some comparison averages and couldn't tell much difference. The A2 came out ahead by a second, but I average around 30 so that's normal for me anyway. I'm might use it in the competition though because I do like the size and the clickly feeling. Like the F2 or mini C, it doesn't lock up or pop.


Anyway, as a side note. What happened to the Ghosthand? They're like the News Kids on the Block. They were all the rage a month or two ago and now have faded away. I think that while the Ghosthand is pretty fast, it does tend to lock up some after you break it in. So it's either Type A2 or F2 depending on whether I want clicky or smooth.
 
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Is there anyone to compare Megahouse JSK to Type A-V and F-II?
Ask and thou shall receive.

Megahouse JSK vs. TYpe A-V (DIY) vs. FII

Prices
FII - $8 (at lightake.com); TYpe A-V - $11 (at lightake.com); JSK - $25+

advantage, FII

Stickers
A-V comes with 2 sets of vinyl stickers, show no sign of wear after 2 weeks of use.
The colour on the FII stickers appear to be printed on with ink, immediately begin fading upon taking it out of the box. Standard stickers also won't fit on an F-II.
JSK stickers are the same as the standard storebought - paper printed with a layer of PET plastic. Will eventually start deteriorating, but not nearly as fast as the FII.

advantage: May be moot, considering that most replace the stickers anyway, but the A-V stickers will hold up the longest.

Turning speed
Upon applying lubricant (I used Jig-A-Loo), the JSK easily turns with the least resistance. Followed by the FII (which comes prelubed). A-V, really depends on your adjustments.

advantage: JSK (but again, variable, depending on your adjustment level)

Specific design features for speedsolving:
A-V: center caps are recessed to avoid catching (and thus reduce lockups), corner/edge/centre pieces are truncated (as opposed to rounded) to minimize lockups and facilitate corner cutting.
F-II: All caps for edges and corners are external, essentially making the contact areas seamless. All pieces are slightly rounded for a softer feel.
JSK: Mechanism is essentially the same as a storebought Rubik's 3x3x3, save for removable caps and adjustable screws.

advantage: A-V

Packaging and accessories (gravy category):
A-V: DIY kit, therefore minimal packaging, but comes with two sets of stickers and GuoJia logo.
F-II: Comes with instruction booklet (written in Chinese). Also fairly minimal packaging (cardboard box with a lenticular picture on it).
JSK: Comes with two instruction booklets (all written in Japanese), one of which contains all algorithms for OLL and PLL. Also has two screwdrivers (one specifically for removing the center caps), a Rubik's stand, and a small tube of lubricant. Because it's intended for brick & mortar retail sales, it has a ton of packaging, enough to hold about 8 cubes (at least).

Advantage: Since it's a "gravy" category, I usually say A-V, as I'm going to get the most use out of the stickers, plus I already have most of the stuff that a JSK comes with. But in terms of sheer STUFF, JSK gets advantage.

Out-of-box functionality
F-II: Comes pre-lubricated and ready to start trying to beat your PB right out of the box.
A-V: First you have to assemble it, adjust the tensions, lubricate it, sticker it, then you can start trying to beat your PB.
JSK: First you have to wade through the mountains of packaging, adjust the tension to your liking, lubricate it, then you can start trying to beat your PB.

Advantage: F-II.

Cutting corners and lockups
FII slightly edges out A-V for corner cutting (forward and reverse), although this will depend on your tension and lubing. As the JSK is largely derived from a Rubik's storebought mechanism, it'll need some breaking in before it's ready for serious speedsolving.

Advangtage: F-II
 
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