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BLD FAQ (Do yourself a favor and read this)

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sqAree
#41
Thanks for all your answers!

It seems like everyone has a different view on M2, so I'm not sure if I know more now..
My big problem is memo time anyway, I need like 6 minutes for the whole cube.. I can work on that regardless of the method.
 
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DarkMaskow
#43
M2 is almost as easy as OP and saves a c**pton of moves. So yeah I would recommend learning M2 asap. Of course it's not a total waste of time but IMO it's not really all that efficient practise either if you want to get fast as quickly as possible...
For recommending M2:
I will find you. Then I will eat you xD

Of course M2 is much faster than OP edges but IMO (and not only IMO I guess) comms for DF buffer are worse than for UF if you just learned TuRBo :p And learning TuRBo is probably easier after OP than moving from M2. Especially if TuRBo is much faster than OP and isn't faster than M2 so why anybody should even try it after M2? ^ _ ^

Of course I can be wrong but I really believe that I am not. And maybe difference isn't that big (especially for lower level, hell yeah, you can do BLD in sub1 using only T-perm and Y-perm xD) but it's crucial when you are aiming for sub25 average.
 
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woody558
#44
For recommending M2:
I will find you. Then I will eat you xD

Of course M2 is much faster than OP edges but IMO (and not only IMO I guess) comms for DF buffer are worse than for UF if you just learned TuRBo :p And learning TuRBo is probably easier after OP than moving from M2. Especially if TuRBo is much faster than OP and isn't faster than M2 so why anybody should even try it after M2? ^ _ ^

Of course I can be wrong but I really believe that I am not. And maybe difference isn't that big (especially for lower level, hell yeah, you can do BLD in sub1 using only T-perm and Y-perm xD) but it's crucial when you are aiming for sub25 average.
Hmm, interesting point. I use M2 and have been gradually incorporating comms for corners (though typically lots of setup moves), and now I'm also looking at edges. I doubt switching to UF would be worth it at this point (avg around 1:10), though. Is there anything making comms from UF inherently better than from DF? The average move counts (using optimal BH) are exactly the same, but is UF a more finger-tricky place for algs? I do like M2's transition into advanced M2 (setting up comms), as well as many easy setups into half slice plane cases (M' U2 M U2 and inverse).
 
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#45
Hmm, interesting point. I use M2 and have been gradually incorporating comms for corners (though typically lots of setup moves), and now I'm also looking at edges. I doubt switching to UF would be worth it at this point (avg around 1:10), though. Is there anything making comms from UF inherently better than from DF? The average move counts (using optimal BH) are exactly the same, but is UF a more finger-tricky place for algs? I do like M2's transition into advanced M2 (setting up comms), as well as many easy setups into half slice plane cases (M' U2 M U2 and inverse).
I think he just meant that going from TuRBo into comms with UF buffer will be better than going from TuRBo into comms with DF buffer. Similarly, going from M2 into comms with DF buffer will probably be a lot easier than going from M2 into comms with UF buffer.
 
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matejmuzatko
#47
In BH method, What is difference A9 and B9?
It's not matter learn methods, but I'm very wonder that.

I'm waiting a answer!
Pure commutators have the form of A B A' B'.
A9/B9 is type of commutator, where you set up to pure commutator and 1 move cancels out.
In A9 the A part has the cancellation and in B9 the B part has the canceled move :) Most people though call all comms where 1 move is canceled an A9 ;)
 
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2016TAYL04
#49
Hi guys, I'm kinda new around here and I was wondering if anyone could help me with a 3BLD query? I have just started looking at 3BLD, so it's all very new. I have watched Noah's videos and I understand most of it, but I am not sure about this aspect:

I have managed to solve my 2x2 blind so far, haha. Just practicing corners. I have been watching Noah's videos, but there's one thing I'm having trouble with. So, is it right that you just need a memo letter for each PIECE rather than sticker? So the most you should end up with for corners is 8 letters or 4 pairs? Or can you end up with more? I'm having some trouble figuring out when to stop. If you have 2 corners (or edges) and it just keeps going back and forth between them, do you just do only one letter for each piece? Like at the end of this one in Noah's video, when you do QOA, how do you know not to include V on the end, or not to leave A off the end? Because once you do QO you've touched all of the pieces, but you go back one more time for A, but not again for V.


Sorry if that's a dumb question or confusing! Hopefully someone can help!
 
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sqAree
#50
It depends on the number of disjoint piece cycles you have.
For example if there is only one corner cycle, you will have 7 letters. For the very first cycle you don't need to come back to the first piece.
But for every additional cycle you have to memorize another sticker of the first piece.
This is because after your first cycle the buffer piece is solved, thus the next shoot unsolves it to break into the next cycle.

So, you have 8 letters if and only if there are two cycles. It's possible to have 7 or more than 8.
 

Kit Clement

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KitClement
#51
Hi guys, I'm kinda new around here and I was wondering if anyone could help me with a 3BLD query? I have just started looking at 3BLD, so it's all very new. I have watched Noah's videos and I understand most of it, but I am not sure about this aspect:

I have managed to solve my 2x2 blind so far, haha. Just practicing corners. I have been watching Noah's videos, but there's one thing I'm having trouble with. So, is it right that you just need a memo letter for each PIECE rather than sticker? So the most you should end up with for corners is 8 letters or 4 pairs? Or can you end up with more? I'm having some trouble figuring out when to stop. If you have 2 corners (or edges) and it just keeps going back and forth between them, do you just do only one letter for each piece? Like at the end of this one in Noah's video, when you do QOA, how do you know not to include V on the end, or not to leave A off the end? Because once you do QO you've touched all of the pieces, but you go back one more time for A, but not again for V.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAbY66g-oNU

Sorry if that's a dumb question or confusing! Hopefully someone can help!
The number of targets for each part of 3BLD is this:

Corner Targets = 7 + (number of cycle breaks) - (permuted pieces)
Edge Targets = 11 + (number of cycle breaks) - (permuted pieces)

However, if you twist corners/flip edges by targeting the same piece twice, then it is:

Corner Targets = 7 + (number of cycle breaks) - (solved pieces) + 2*(twisted corners)
Edge Targets = 11 + (number of cycle breaks) - (solved pieces) + 2*(flipped edges)
 
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2016TAYL04
#52
The number of targets for each part of 3BLD is this:

Corner Targets = 7 + (number of cycle breaks) - (permuted pieces)
Edge Targets = 11 + (number of cycle breaks) - (permuted pieces)

However, if you twist corners/flip edges by targeting the same piece twice, then it is:

Corner Targets = 7 + (number of cycle breaks) - (solved pieces) + 2*(twisted corners)
Edge Targets = 11 + (number of cycle breaks) - (solved pieces) + 2*(flipped edges)
Thanks, that's really helpful! I'll go away and reflect on that for a while. The theory is the same for corners and edges right? So if I just practice memoing and sighted solving corners for a bit it should help me to see how it works and once it makes sense for corners it will make sense for edges?
 

Kit Clement

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#53
Thanks, that's really helpful! I'll go away and reflect on that for a while. The theory is the same for corners and edges right? So if I just practice memoing and sighted solving corners for a bit it should help me to see how it works and once it makes sense for corners it will make sense for edges?
Yeah, it's all the same idea. The basic idea is to first assume everything needs permutation, which requires you to have 7 targets, because solving 7 of the 8 corners requires the 8th to be solved. But clearly, if a piece is already permuted, you won't need to target it, so the number will drop for every permuted piece. However, if you solve your buffer before you've reached the required number of 7 (minus the permuted pieces), then you're doing another target just to put something else in the buffer position. This target doesn't solve any piece though, which is why the extra target is needed every time you need to break into a new cycle.
 
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#54
I've watched a few videos and read a few things on the internet and they've said different things about OP (They all say it uses a different amount of algorithms). What are the three algorithms you're talking about in the original post? I got bored and wanted to learn BLD.
 
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#55
I've watched a few videos and read a few things on the internet and they've said different things about OP (They all say it uses a different amount of algorithms). What are the three algorithms you're talking about in the original post? I got bored and wanted to learn BLD.
You only NEED 2 algs if you flip pieces by treating them as independent short cycles with only 2 targets. T-perm (to swap the edges) and modified Y-perm without F/F' at the beginning/end (to swap corners)

But I recommend 4 algs. Those 2 mentioned above and one for flipping 2 edges and one for twisting 2 corners...
 
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Will Belote
#56
I've watched a few videos and read a few things on the internet and they've said different things about OP (They all say it uses a different amount of algorithms). What are the three algorithms you're talking about in the original post? I got bored and wanted to learn BLD.
T perm for edges, Y perm for corners, and one way to deal with parity is with an R perm. I think the easiest way to deal with parity is to just switch UB and UL in memo.
 
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#57
Thanks. I already know t perm and modified y perm. R perm shouldn't be that hard since I learned altered y perm in a few minutes. Next I just need to have a good memory system and practice a bit. Then I should be on my way.
 

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