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Barefoot Running

RyanReese09

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Lol I'm not a runner and I never aspire to be, but I spend march to October in either flip flops or bare feet. By the time winter starts my feet are extremely calloused and that helps to prevent injuries, but I have cut the sole of my foot doing it and though the rest of u guys are laughing off glass in your foot to try to be tough, I'm honest enough to say that getting cut in the sole of your foot genuinely hurts.

Also I'm guessing that most barefoot runners or people who just go barefoot like me have experienced cuts on the soles of your feet. Yet you still claim that shoes injure people and barefoot people are perfectly healthy?

Also I'd like to point out that running on hard surfaces like asphalt, concrete, etc. hurts quite a bit and even though your feet may toughen up, cushioning protects the foot.

Another case is asphalt on a sunny day. BURNING HOT! I for one don't want to be without any foot wear when I'm walking down an asphalt road lol.

Going barefoot is awesome IMO, but don't promote it beyond reason.
Two words. Trail Running.
 

PandaCuber

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Lol I'm not a runner and I never aspire to be, but I spend march to October in either flip flops or bare feet. By the time winter starts my feet are extremely calloused and that helps to prevent injuries,
Barefoot runners dont have callouses... That means youre doing something very wrong.

I have cut the sole of my foot doing it and though the rest of u guys are laughing off glass in your foot to try to be tough, I'm honest enough to say that getting cut in the sole of your foot genuinely hurts.
Once again, youre probably landing too hard and youre pushing off the ground, putting friction on your feet. Lift your feet up, dont push off.

Also I'm guessing that most barefoot runners or people who just go barefoot like me have experienced cuts on the soles of your feet. Yet you still claim that shoes injure people and barefoot people are perfectly healthy?
Cuts? Whats that? Ive never gotten any.
You really gotta do more research on How to Run in general.

Also I'd like to point out that running on hard surfaces like asphalt, concrete, etc. hurts quite a bit and even though your feet may toughen up, cushioning protects the foot
Running on hard surfaces are actually BETTER for barefoot running. Landing with your knees bent and on the ball of the foot, you will be pain free. Its not about 'Tough' feet, its about landing and running correctly. Barefoot running teaches you how to run like you were meant to.
Cushoning restricts the amount of muscles you use while you run. Also messes up your natural form.


Another case is asphalt on a sunny day. BURNING HOT! I for one don't want to be without any foot wear when I'm walking down an asphalt road lol.
Walk on the white line. Black absorbs more heat than white. Or wear sandals or Huaraches.

Going barefoot is awesome IMO, but don't promote it beyond reason.
 

E3cubestore

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Barefoot runners dont have callouses... That means youre doing something very wrong.



Once again, youre probably landing too hard and youre pushing off the ground, putting friction on your feet. Lift your feet up, dont push off.



Cuts? Whats that? Ive never gotten any.
You really gotta do more research on How to Run in general.



Running on hard surfaces are actually BETTER for barefoot running. Landing with your knees bent and on the ball of the foot, you will be pain free. Its not about 'Tough' feet, its about landing and running correctly. Barefoot running teaches you how to run like you were meant to.
Cushoning restricts the amount of muscles you use while you run. Also messes up your natural form.




Walk on the white line. Black absorbs more heat than white. Or wear sandals or Huaraches.

Going barefoot is awesome IMO, but don't promote it beyond reason.
Callouses: a callous is a buildup up of insensitive skin material, if parts of your skin are continually exposed to friction, a callous will appear. When I walk barefoot for long periods of time, my feet are exposed to friction, therefore I get callouses. Explain what I'm doing wrong.

"don't push off feet": first of all I said I'm not a runner, but I walk bare feet, my question for you is, if you aren't supposed to push with your feet, where does the momentum come from?!?!

Cuts: several people in this thread have already stated that they have cut their feet on glass etc. you really have to be careful with your feet since you can get infected from cuts or blood poisoning from cuts on metal. Feet toughen up, but your soles can still get injured.

Hard surfaces: I'm not even going to argue this point, all I know is that if I walk barefoot on hard surfaces for long periods of time, my feet become sore. And I don't intend to bend my knees and walk in the wierd position you describe lol. But you might be right as far as cushioning, so I can't argue, but I did notice you just stated "facts" without any semblance of evidence.

Hot surfaces: you seriously expect me to walk on a 4 inch wide line to avoid burning when I could just put on footwear? First of all that is dangerously near to vehicles traveling on the road, second it would require extra concentration that I would rather devote to a conversation with a friend, third, it still wouldn't alleviate the problem 100%, the white part does warm up too, just not as intensely. Fourth, many roads, especially in my rural area, have no white lines marked.

And did you just plagiarize me in the last line of your response?!?
 

PandaCuber

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Callouses: a callous is a buildup up of insensitive skin material, if parts of your skin are continually exposed to friction, a callous will appear. When I walk barefoot for long periods of time, my feet are exposed to friction, therefore I get callouses. Explain what I'm doing wrong.

"don't push off feet": first of all I said I'm not a runner, but I walk bare feet, my question for you is, if you aren't supposed to push with your feet, where does the momentum come from?!?!

Cuts: several people in this thread have already stated that they have cut their feet on glass etc. you really have to be careful with your feet since you can get infected from cuts or blood poisoning from cuts on metal. Feet toughen up, but your soles can still get injured.

Hard surfaces: I'm not even going to argue this point, all I know is that if I walk barefoot on hard surfaces for long periods of time, my feet become sore. And I don't intend to bend my knees and walk in the wierd position you describe lol. But you might be right as far as cushioning, so I can't argue, but I did notice you just stated "facts" without any semblance of evidence.

Hot surfaces: you seriously expect me to walk on a 4 inch wide line to avoid burning when I could just put on footwear? First of all that is dangerously near to vehicles traveling on the road, second it would require extra concentration that I would rather devote to a conversation with a friend, third, it still wouldn't alleviate the problem 100%, the white part does warm up too, just not as intensely. Fourth, many roads, especially in my rural area, have no white lines marked.

And did you just plagiarize me in the last line of your response?!?

"Going barefoot is awesome IMO, but don't promote it beyond reason. "

I swear on my life I didnt write this. I would never write "IMO" anyway. Who the fff wrote this? Seriously I didnt.

Oh so you are walking...Hm, havent done much walking lol. I perfer running where ever I need to go.

About the callouses, just dont walk that much and wait til your feet get used to walking barefoot. Go slow and gradually increase the amount of time you walk.
I only get this when I run toooo much. Choose a comfortable time/distance and stick to that.

Cuts: Be careful where you walk. Dont be stupid and walk on broken glass and metal until youve been barefoot for a while.

Sorry, facts came from the investigation ive made on barefoot running. Maybe try landing midfoot when you walk. As I said, dont go walk a 42K marathon the first month barefoot. Just like cubing. You start off with LBL doing 2 minutes a solve, then gradually increase to F2L then sub 20(for example)

Hot: Sandals.
Cold: Sandals with socks :D

And you did say *Running quite a few times, so I thought you were a runner. My bad. But same concepts apply.
 

E3cubestore

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The start of my post read "I'm not a runner and never aspire to be", just because I mentioned running in a running thread doesn't mean I am a runner.

Just like if I talk about murderers who murder peole, i am not automatically a murderer.

Thank you for acknowledging my argument on most points but there is something you didn't address:

You said that people's feet getting hurt was a result of pushing off the feet and creating friction. My question is, where the heck does the momentum come from if you are lifting your feet up and not pushing with them?!? The wind??

You obviously don't have a clue what you are talking about.
 

PandaCuber

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The start of my post read "I'm not a runner and never aspire to be", just because I mentioned running in a running thread doesn't mean I am a runner.

Just like if I talk about murderers who murder peole, i am not automatically a murderer.

Thank you for acknowledging my argument on most points but there is something you didn't address:

You said that people's feet getting hurt was a result of pushing off the feet and creating friction. My question is, where the heck does the momentum come from if you are lifting your feet up and not pushing with them?!? The wind??

You obviously don't have a clue what you are talking about.
Leaning foward from the ankles.
Light, swift steps helps from causing a lot of friction when you run.
Landing softly is key in barefoot running.
Curving the toes slightly up can cause less friction in the ball of foot area.

If you want to get even MORE specific, look at the spoiler.
So, to land without skidding or sliding, you must take control and
responsibility for the motion of your foot. And the best way to
accomplish this is to move it in a smooth curve—not really a circle, but
more of a flat-bottom oval shape. At the bottom of this oval, the foot
should be traveling at precisely the speed and direction the surface is
traveling beneath us. When it’s done right, it will feel a lot like you’re
bicycling.
When it’s time to lift the foot, we can avoid pushing it back or
dragging it along the ground by lifting straight up. As it elevates, the
foot’s relative backward momentum (in relation to your body) should
start to slow, and then start to accelerate as it is automatically pulled
foward by your body and leg.
Now, while swinging your leg forward, it is time to do something that
seems counterintuitive: start lifting the foot before it lands. It’s easy
enough—just bend the knee. Since your body is still falling, it takes
time to reverse the direction of the foot, which continues to travel down
toward the ground. But in relation to your body, the foot is actually
beginning to move up. This relative rise also starts your foot moving
backward—the direction the running surface is traveling beneath us.
Like an airplane landing, your sole should gently and gracefully touch
down; unlike an airplane, however, it won’t roll forward on the surface,
but stays in one place on the ground and moves backward relative to
your forward-moving body. And there you are, back to the same
position where you began, except that you’re two steps forward.
Again, the goal here is not to try to rigidly or robotically drill the
above-described motion into your running, but rather to feel how you
are moving, and respond by making adjustments and fine-tuning.
Ideally, within several steps you’ll have progressed to a much
smoother, less jerky, more “curvy” motion. Whenever you need to be
responsive to unknown terrain, your bare soles give you the cues
instantly, so that you can respond appropriately.

People get hurt from bad form.
 

E3cubestore

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My point is that you do have to push with your feet, if you simply lifted them, as you suggested, you wouldn't move

Anyway I've had my fun in this discussion, carry on ;)
 

poke544

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I don't run bare-foot much... or run much any more, though I really need to start. I used to run in wrestling shoes which had much less support than my running shoes, and it feels completely different.
 

Stefan

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So, to land without skidding or sliding, you must take control and
responsibility for the motion of your foot. And the best way to
accomplish this is to move it in a smooth curve—not really a circle, but
more of a flat-bottom oval shape. At the bottom of this oval, the foot
should be traveling at precisely the speed and direction the surface is
traveling beneath us. When it’s done right, it will feel a lot like you’re
bicycling.
When it’s time to lift the foot, we can avoid pushing it back or
dragging it along the ground by lifting straight up. As it elevates, the
foot’s relative backward momentum (in relation to your body) should
start to slow, and then start to accelerate as it is automatically pulled
foward by your body and leg.
Now, while swinging your leg forward, it is time to do something that
seems counterintuitive: start lifting the foot before it lands. It’s easy
enough—just bend the knee. Since your body is still falling, it takes
time to reverse the direction of the foot, which continues to travel down
toward the ground. But in relation to your body, the foot is actually
beginning to move up. This relative rise also starts your foot moving
backward—the direction the running surface is traveling beneath us.
Like an airplane landing, your sole should gently and gracefully touch
down; unlike an airplane, however, it won’t roll forward on the surface,
but stays in one place on the ground and moves backward relative to
your forward-moving body. And there you are, back to the same
position where you began, except that you’re two steps forward.
Again, the goal here is not to try to rigidly or robotically drill the
above-described motion into your running, but rather to feel how you
are moving, and respond by making adjustments and fine-tuning.
Ideally, within several steps you’ll have progressed to a much
smoother, less jerky, more “curvy” motion. Whenever you need to be
responsive to unknown terrain, your bare soles give you the cues
instantly, so that you can respond appropriately.
Did you write that, or is that from some book? If the latter, which?
 

Sillas

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I could only reach two conclusions:
- The students of Harvard could have much and much better in that article, but it not means that they are wrong.
- If you want it, you may train and prepare your body to the impact of that exercise. Pain in the spine are bad sign.
 

Thorsten

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I read the whole thread in one turn.

And I'm very interested in barefoot running.

But there is one thing i didn't see an answer in this thread (and is probably a part of the line between shoe-runners and barefoot-runners):

What is the best way to get to barefoot running?
Some people wrote: Yeah just start walking around barefoot. I do that pretty much, but I don't think this will clean all the path to barefoot running, because barefoot running needs a different style of running (not land on your heels).

What would be the best way to train this style of running?
 

PandaCuber

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brusinque
I read the whole thread in one turn.

And I'm very interested in barefoot running.

But there is one thing i didn't see an answer in this thread (and is probably a part of the line between shoe-runners and barefoot-runners):

What is the best way to get to barefoot running?
Some people wrote: Yeah just start walking around barefoot. I do that pretty much, but I don't think this will clean all the path to barefoot running, because barefoot running needs a different style of running (not land on your heels).

What would be the best way to train this style of running?
Well, when you wear shoes, there are many muscles that you dont use, so what you have to do is gradually learn to use those un-used muscles.
Start walking barefoot. Just walk anywhere and really feel the ground. Get used to it.
When youre ready, you can start running 5-7 minutes a day(too much and you get hurt). Most of the form will come natural.
The next week you can move up to 10 minutes, etc.
Listen to your feet.
 

24653483361

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I just ran a 6:58 mile today with a 3:30ish split half mile. I have a week break coming up and I want to train a lot and get my mile time down. But I also want to make sure I don't injure myself. So if you train barefoot, is it okay to wear running shoes at your race?
 

PandaCuber

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"Ultra-marathon runner Micah True, missing for four days in the rugged wilderness of New Mexico, was found dead on Saturday, police said.

True, 58, was found in the mountainous Gila National Forest in southwest New Mexico, near the Arizona border in the early evening, said Tom Bemis, incident commander with the New Mexico State Police.

Nicknamed "Caballo Blanco," or White Horse, True became a celebrity after he was featured in the best-selling book "Born to Run" by Christopher McDougall."


I started having fun while running because of this man. He was my idol. He showed us how to be happier.

"If I were to be remembered for anything at all, I would want that to be that I am/was authentic. No Mas. Run Free!" - Micah True

I just ran a 6:58 mile today with a 3:30ish split half mile. I have a week break coming up and I want to train a lot and get my mile time down. But I also want to make sure I don't injure myself. So if you train barefoot, is it okay to wear running shoes at your race?
If you want to train barefoot and race in shoes, you must have a balance between both. Some simpler workouts barefoot and workouts that are actually running a mile, you might want to do in shoes.
Remember to start small if youre new to barefoot. Jog 7 mins for that week(Could be warm up jog). Even though that seems like very little, it does a lot.

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/ConsumerNews/skechers-shape-ups-lawsuit-woman-sues-toning-shoes/story?id=12927314
 

Ickathu

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Did this die?
Anyway, I'm going for a 15 minute run tomorrow (starting a 5k training program) and I wanted to know if that is too long to start off barefoot running. I was talking to a friend and he said that he tried barefoot once on just a 1 mile run (7 min) and it totally destroyed and tore up his feet. Suggestions? I don't really want to get injured on my very first day of training. I've been running recently - not far, but maybe 1 mile 2-3 times a week, but I wear shoes, so this would be a total shift. Should I just try running on my toes, like you run barefoot?
 
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PandaCuber

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Did this die?
Anyway, I'm going for a 15 minute run tomorrow (starting a 5k training program) and I wanted to know if that is too long to start off barefoot running. I was talking to a friend and he said that he tried barefoot once on just a 1 mile run (7 min) and it totally destroyed and tore up his feet. Suggestions? I don't really want to get injured on my very first day of training. I've been running recently - not far, but maybe 1 mile 2-3 times a week, but I wear shoes, so this would be a total shift. Should I just try running on my toes, like you run barefoot?
start off really slow. like 7 minutes. or less. then if you want, put your shoes back on and keep running.

the first day, i went 20 minutes. I ended up with blood blisters and couldnt walk right for the next 4 days.
so, take it slow, build up muscles(you dont use all your muscles when running with shoes) and build up skin.

Ive been running shoes my entire life. Track team and everything with shoes. I switched almost a year ago. Its never too late to switch to barefoot.

yeah i go bare.

--------------
humans havent been around since the beginning of the world.

-------------
Other running tips.

If you want to run better and recover faster, eat fruits. Like oranges.
Dont take those [email protected] powders and gels and whatnot. Those dont work and are not good for you. stick to fruits.
 
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