• Welcome to the Speedsolving.com, home of the web's largest puzzle community!
    You are currently viewing our forum as a guest which gives you limited access to join discussions and access our other features.

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community of 35,000+ people from around the world today!

    If you are already a member, simply login to hide this message and begin participating in the community!

Older cubers discussions

openseas

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2015
Messages
396
WCA
2015PARK24
The fact is, youngsters improve way, way quicker than us oldies, and go further before hitting their limits. Even if there's an element of humblebragging involved, there's no point getting annoyed or frustrated about faster youngsters' progress or their desire to talk about it. Just enjoy your own progress and feel good about reaching your own goals - or if you're competitive, theres the oldies' rankings to watch! :)
Completely agree!


That’s what kids do - brag about their progress but also complain not achieving their goals so quickly (then they expected).

and that’s another reason we have our own thread for oldies.
 

Miguel.Brazil

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Messages
1
I dont mind about other cubers times . I really enjoy the learning process , now Im very happy with my time ( now betwen 40s -50s for me a wonderfull time !) im improving slowly, perform the algorithms is great pleasure. My goal is tô reach my personal limits. Cubing is Just one of my interests in life .
 

SlechtValk

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2010
Messages
24
Location
The Netherlands
WCA
2011BOGA02
Generally his videos are pretty good, but there's not much I agree with in this one.
What is he so wrong about in your opinion?

Things like these are always major generalisations, but I find myself pretty far to the right om the practise-learn new things scale.

It is hard for me to find the time and motivation to practise what I know. That takes a lot of energie and focus. It is easier to find the next tutorial for the next event than to get my 3x3 cross times below X seconds.

Since I restarted cubing about a month ago I have learnt (but not mastered) new methods for solving the 4x4, 5x5 and megaminx, started to learn a new event (square-1) and started practising ways to improve cross and f2l.

But I haven't done a single timed session of 12 solves on any event yet...

Sent from my Nokia 7 plus using Tapatalk
 

bossel

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2019
Messages
12
Location
South East of France
I completely fall into the category of the old that wants to know every algorithm. I first learnt basic F2L, the 2look PLL and 2look OLL.
Then I was intrigued by full PLL and learned it, took a few weeks. Then some time ago I looked int full OLL and got addicted to it. I know all of the moves now, but need to learn them much better (still need my cheat-sheet a lot) (but don't need my full PLL cheat sheet anymore!!).

So yes in the end, given that I don't practice too much, there is not many repeating of each alg.
At this stage I might still be faster with just using 2look OLL, maybe sometimes 2look PLL.
But I assume that, and speed is not the final goal at the moment. When it bores me, I put the cube away and turn on the TV, it's just a hobby after all (my wife would still say it's an obsession :)) )

I take this as a long term trip, and eventually times will come down.

There is another JPerm Video 'Look ahead is a disctraction' where he describe the 3 stages of learning as
1 - Know your moves
2 - Turn fast
3 - Look ahead

As this is just 3 steps, that's something I can remember :) and plan to follow.

I am somewhere at the end of phase 1 and starting phase 2 - I am a a pretty slow turner and need to improve finger tricks and muscle memory.
 

CLL Smooth

Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2012
Messages
255
WCA
2012LOET01
YouTube
channel/UCKX4VUjMV0bnQWTj_v5vIOQ
I find these to be some pretty bold generalizations myself. I’ve seen myself teeter back and forth between these two schools of thought over the past 8-9 years of my cubing experience. However, most of my time is clearly spent practicing stuff I’ve already learned by simply doing solves. I see it as less of an older/younger comparison and more of a personality type and/or life situation difference in specific cubers.
Edit: retracted my last statement as I misunderstood how he categorized older/younger cuber
 
Last edited:

mark49152

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
4,694
Location
UK
WCA
2015RIVE05
YouTube
mark49152
What is he so wrong about in your opinion?
I just think it's a gross over-simplification.

While it's reasonable to talk about a spectrum of attitudes, from emphasis on practice to emphasis on study, I don't personally see much correlation with age. If I look around at the cubers I know, and the forums and FB groups, I see plenty of examples of youngsters learning new things and oldsters content to just practise - it really just comes down to the interests and motivations of the individual. IMHO it's a stretch to claim it as "the difference" between older and younger cubers, as if it's not only the primary difference but the only significant one.
 

chron0s

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2017
Messages
135
Gonna jump in here and introduce myself, hope that's ok - I've been lightly active on the forum over my cubing journey so far but not a big poster - I'm an oldcuber and came into the hobby / sport a few years ago (no formal comp experience but plenty of solves at home), lately having fun getting more systematic about progress.

I saw JPerms video and personally it resonated with me and pointed the way forward - despite being old, I've been lazy about learning algs throughout my cubing evolution - in 3x3 I use 2-look OLL and PLL and I've both seen the benefits of drilling a smaller set of algs (I average ~23 seconds without any strong last layer skills) and am also facing a recent wall in my progression with my last layer - I was able to get some improvements by drilling better algs for 2-look but I'm at a point where last-layer wise I need to branch into full PLL and get my recognition good to make more improvements on my averages. I'm working on full PLL and training recognition is a new challenge. Despite being old(er), I don't have a particular study discipline to rely on with cubing so maybe I am young at heart :) I liked the solves JPerm showed at the end of that video - 30 second averages with careful recognition and quality execution.

Anyway honored to be among you all, there's no age limit to cubing!
 

Tom Joad

Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2016
Messages
129
Gonna jump in here and introduce myself, hope that's ok - I've been lightly active on the forum over my cubing journey so far but not a big poster - I'm an oldcuber and came into the hobby / sport a few years ago (no formal comp experience but plenty of solves at home), lately having fun getting more systematic about progress.

I saw JPerms video and personally it resonated with me and pointed the way forward - despite being old, I've been lazy about learning algs throughout my cubing evolution - in 3x3 I use 2-look OLL and PLL and I've both seen the benefits of drilling a smaller set of algs (I average ~23 seconds without any strong last layer skills) and am also facing a recent wall in my progression with my last layer - I was able to get some improvements by drilling better algs for 2-look but I'm at a point where last-layer wise I need to branch into full PLL and get my recognition good to make more improvements on my averages. I'm working on full PLL and training recognition is a new challenge. Despite being old(er), I don't have a particular study discipline to rely on with cubing so maybe I am young at heart :) I liked the solves JPerm showed at the end of that video - 30 second averages with careful recognition and quality execution.

Anyway honored to be among you all, there's no age limit to cubing!
Once you know a pll alg, drill it and get nearly all of them sub 2 seconds. Record your times - this is a great motivational tool.

Also learn two sided pll recognition. There are loads of resources out there to help with this.
 

Tom Joad

Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2016
Messages
129
Hi, I'm old but new to this forum.

I just did an intro post about myself here.
There will be plenty on here having a chuckle at a 29 year old turning up and calling himself old.

Check out the over 40s rankings and see how you do as you strive to become the best in the world... in 2030

11 years to become sub 10... Easy!
 

mark49152

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
4,694
Location
UK
WCA
2015RIVE05
YouTube
mark49152
There will be plenty on here having a chuckle at a 29 year old turning up and calling himself old.
Quote: "really too old to be actively involved in speedcubing events or forums"

Not chuckling at that I'm afraid, it's actually rather sad. Just get yourself involved and have some fun with it!
 

Jason Green

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2015
Messages
1,136
Location
Fort Worth, TX
WCA
2016GREE02
YouTube
Jason Green
Hey guys, haven't been on the forum in ages! I did my first comp today in almost a year (a year tomorrow actually). I haven't been practicing much and averaged 20.87 in 3x3, 1:20 in 4x4. I did have 1:06 which is pretty good for me even when I was in practice. :) It was fun like always! One of these days I hope to practice more again, we just moved and life has been pretty busy!
 

Jason Green

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2015
Messages
1,136
Location
Fort Worth, TX
WCA
2016GREE02
YouTube
Jason Green
Welcome back, Jason! Those are pretty good times considering the long break.
Thanks Mark! I've peeked in the thread probably less than a dozen times over the last year and know there's lots of new cubers here (at least I think). It kind of feels weird... like I'm an outsider where I used to belong. I thought today might motivate me to get back into it, and it definitely does feel motivating yet I'm worried if it will matter. Doubling the number of kids in the household really takes a toll on your schedule. :)
 

Jason Green

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2015
Messages
1,136
Location
Fort Worth, TX
WCA
2016GREE02
YouTube
Jason Green
I just think it's a gross over-simplification.

While it's reasonable to talk about a spectrum of attitudes, from emphasis on practice to emphasis on study, I don't personally see much correlation with age. If I look around at the cubers I know, and the forums and FB groups, I see plenty of examples of youngsters learning new things and oldsters content to just practise - it really just comes down to the interests and motivations of the individual. IMHO it's a stretch to claim it as "the difference" between older and younger cubers, as if it's not only the primary difference but the only significant one.
I just watched the video. I also think it misses the main differences (well it mentions them but doesn't give them much weight). I think the three biggest are being young (meaning a more sponge like mind, better visual recognition, faster reflexes, etc.), the amount of time to practice, and turn speed (related to being young also). Look at PLL and OLL algs, the fast kids can do most of them in under a second, I have drilled them for many hours and don't know if I can do any in one second (see practice time also, maybe not enough hours). For me deciding to learn full PLL and OLL was not because I was more inclined to study, I actually leaned the other way. But someone pointed out if it takes over 2 seconds to do an alg and I can do 1 instead of 2 that's as huge savings. I have no doubt that paid off, but a lot of the other things like winter variation I was not convinced would be worth it for me and have not done.

I would love to see a follow up from J Perm when he is in his mid 40s. Of course getting fast at a young age may have an effect we do not know about yet (since I do not think there are any sub 10 average cubers who have reached their 40s yet).
 
Top