• Welcome to the Speedsolving.com, home of the web's largest puzzle community!
    You are currently viewing our forum as a guest which gives you limited access to join discussions and access our other features.

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community of 35,000+ people from around the world today!

    If you are already a member, simply login to hide this message and begin participating in the community!

Blindfold Accomplishment Thread

Habsen

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2019
Messages
33
WCA
2020HABE01
I just finished my project to learn half of the 3-Style UF edge comms. Now I know all A, B, D, E, M, Q, and eight more M slice comms plus all their inverses. For the other half I only need a one move L/R setup to a known case. Now it's time to practice them a lot which is much more enjoyable for me than learning algs.

Good times are coming :D
 

CuberStache

Member
Joined
May 7, 2018
Messages
294
Location
Washington State, USA
WCA
2016DAVI02
YouTube
Visit Channel
For the other half I only need a one move L/R setup to a known case.
Nice job learning all those comms! I would advise you to not spend too much time knowing only part of 3-style though. Practicing what you know before learning more is a good idea, but make sure you don't get too comfortable. Learn the rest of the comms soon. Good luck!
 

dudefaceguy

Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2019
Messages
98
First 3bld success with parity just now. I'm using my own no-algorithm parity method, so this is pretty cool for me. I detect the parity quickly before memorization. If there is odd parity, I memorize the top layer displaced by a U' quarter turn. Then I just do a U' immediately after putting on the blindfold. This is not viable for competitive speedsolving, but it's great if you refuse to learn any algorithms (like me).

This is my first success with parity and without making any written notes.
 

AbsoRuud

Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2018
Messages
899
Location
Lelystad, Flevoland, The Netherlands
WCA
2019POLL04
YouTube
Visit Channel
Yesterday I was on a video livestream of a Dutch famous radio DJ. I had a regular solve and then I had a 3BLD success live on the stream. It took me 2:36 to execute, and about 4 minutes to memo. The day before, I failed, so I was super happy to get the success, especially with hundreds of people watching... You can imagine my heart rate the second time around...
 

KingCanyon

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2019
Messages
208
Location
Colorado
WCA
2015KIND01
YouTube
Visit Channel
Yesterday I was on a video livestream of a Dutch famous radio DJ. I had a regular solve and then I had a 3BLD success live on the stream. It took me 2:36 to execute, and about 4 minutes to memo. The day before, I failed, so I was super happy to get the success, especially with hundreds of people watching... You can imagine my heart rate the second time around...
That sounds nerve-racking. I always get nervous for 3BLD solves in front of people, especially non-cubers.
 

dudefaceguy

Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2019
Messages
98
3 successes in a row - I timed the last 2 and smashed my PB both times. 11:10 and 7:56 - a big improvement over my previous time of 13 minutes. The last scramble had 4 twisted corners including the buffer, and I realized during execution that I had memorized my last commutator incorrectly, so it was quite exciting. No odd parity, though one of the other successful solves did have it.
 

dudefaceguy

Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2019
Messages
98
I'm still having a blast learning 3style intuitively as my first blind method. I developed my own semi-intuitive parity method, which was a lot of fun.

I've had some successes with my no-algorithm parity method of memorizing the U layer displaced by one quarter-turn, then doing a U' before execution. It works, but it's very slow - and more importantly, it's super annoying and not fun.

So, I decided to see if I could solve odd parity semi-intuitively using Niklas. I use Niklas to convert from odd parity to even parity in other situations, and it turns out that it actually works here too! Doing a Niklas and then a Sune from the opposite side will swap two corners and two edges, solving the last 4 odd-parity targets. You can cancel 3 moves in between to make a more efficient 11-move algorithm. Here it is with it's mirror:

(L’ U R U’ L) U2 (R’ U R U2 R’)

(R U' L' U R') U2 (L U' L' U2 L)

Here's how I use this to solve odd parity in 3bld. This assumes you are using C (UF/UFR) as your edge and corner buffer.

If there is parity, leave the last edge target unsolved. Then, when you are solving your last odd corner, conjugate the last edge and the last corner to B, perform the parity algorithm, and undo the conjugate. This will result in a solved cube.

You can also switch the edge buffer with B during the edge phase, to avoid conjugating two pieces at the same time. To do this, just add B to the end of the edge letters, which will give you an even number of letters and one more commutator. It’s usually more move-efficient to leave the last odd edge unsolved and conjugate it to B before performing the parity algorithm, but this means that you have to remember a much longer conjugate, which increases the risk of errors. I just decide on the fly based on how difficult the conjugates are in that particular solve.
 

CuberStache

Member
Joined
May 7, 2018
Messages
294
Location
Washington State, USA
WCA
2016DAVI02
YouTube
Visit Channel
You can also switch the edge buffer with B during the edge phase, to avoid conjugating two pieces at the same time. To do this, just add B to the end of the edge letters, which will give you an even number of letters and one more commutator. It’s usually more move-efficient to leave the last odd edge unsolved and conjugate it to B before performing the parity algorithm, but this means that you have to remember a much longer conjugate, which increases the risk of errors. I just decide on the fly based on how difficult the conjugates are in that particular solve.
Awesome, your progress is fun to watch! Here's a tip for parity that top BLD solvers do: If you have parity, solve the C edge to the B position instead of just tacking it onto the end of your solution. This only works if you memorize corners first because that way you know ahead of time that there's parity when you're memorizing edges. Then, when you're memorizing edges, memorize while pretending that B is C and C is B. The result will be an even number of letters that solves everything and leaves B and C swapped. This is creatively called UF/UR swap. I think you'll have fun implementing it into your solves! It usually saves one algorithm/word, but even though you don't care about speed, I think you'll enjoy the mental challenge it brings. If it's too confusing, no big deal, but when I learned it I thought it was really cool.
 

dudefaceguy

Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2019
Messages
98
Awesome, your progress is fun to watch! Here's a tip for parity that top BLD solvers do: If you have parity, solve the C edge to the B position instead of just tacking it onto the end of your solution. This only works if you memorize corners first because that way you know ahead of time that there's parity when you're memorizing edges. Then, when you're memorizing edges, memorize while pretending that B is C and C is B. The result will be an even number of letters that solves everything and leaves B and C swapped. This is creatively called UF/UR swap. I think you'll have fun implementing it into your solves! It usually saves one algorithm/word, but even though you don't care about speed, I think you'll enjoy the mental challenge it brings. If it's too confusing, no big deal, but when I learned it I thought it was really cool.
Thanks for the tip - I'll try that. Is it easier to include the buffer in this, or to use two non-buffer edges?
 

Want to hide this ad and support the community?
Top