Masayuki Akimoto

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Masayuki Akimoto
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Masayuki Akimoto
Background Information
Alias(es):
Country: Japan
Born: c. 1966 (age 51–52)
Occupation(s):
Years Active: 1981-present
WCA ID: 2003AKIM01
Claim to Fame: Big cube Columns First, 2003 4x4 and 5x5 World Champion

Masayuki Akimoto (秋元正行) is a Japanese speedcuber. He is a current board member of the WCA. He also served as the chairman of the JRCA (Japan Rubik's Cube Association) from its foundation through 2011.

In the 1980s Masayuki Akimoto was fifth in the first national tournament in Japan, and the fourth in the second tournament. At the first tournament he states that his method was "very primitive (average about 50 sec?)" but he then developed an original corners-first method bringing his times down to about 27-28 seconds.[1]

He began cubing again in the early 2000s after not touching a Rubik's Cube for "two or three years around 1997-2000". He switched to a CFCE method similar to that used by Guus Razoux Schultz, allowing him to achieve sub-20 second times. He attended the World Rubik's Games Championship 2003 and won the championship for 4x4 and 5x5 using an original Columns First method.[2]

Akimoto Method

Main article: Akimoto Method

Masayuki Akimoto invented the Columns First method for Big cubes in the 1980s, which he used to win the 4x4 and 5x5 Speedsolve at the World Championship. The solution steps are:

  1. Solve the top corners.
  2. Solve the four middle layer dedges.
  3. Solve the top centre.
  4. Solve three dedges of the top layer.
  5. Solve the remaining centres.
  6. Solve the last dedge of the top layer.
  7. Solve the last (bottom) layer (corners, dedges, fix parities)

Achievements

World Titles
Preceded by
None
4x4 Speedsolve World Champion
2003
Succeeded by
Yuki Hayashi
2005
Preceded by
None
5x5 Speedsolve World Champion
2003
Succeeded by
Frank Morris
2005
Preceded by
None
2x2 Speedsolve World Champion
2005
Succeeded by
Łukasz Ciałoń
2007

External links