CxLL Recognition

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In many methods, such as Corners First, CLL for 2x2, Waterman, and Roux, there is a step which solves four corners on a single layer. Using a general term, this is commonly referred to as CLL. If CLL is performed as a single step, it involves orienting and permuting the corners simultaneously. There are 43 cases and the way in which the solver determines which of these cases they encounter in each solve is called "recognition". There have been several recognition methods developed for determining the CLL cases.

Recognition Methods

U Stickers + Pattern

In this recognition method, first the orientation of the stickers that belong on the U layer is found. Then the solver checks pre-determined positions for patterns of matching, opposite, or neutral stickers. This is the most commonly used recognition method. It is currently unknown who originally developed this recognition system. The earliest known development is by Marc Waterman and Daan Krammer for use in the Waterman method.

U Sticker + Pattern Recognition.png

ACRM

Athefre's Corner Recognition Method (ACRM) is designed to be used in normal solves, solves where non-matching blocks were used, and Transformation as in the 42 method and the A2 method. In other words, it can be used to recognize CxLL, NMCLL, and CCLL. ACRM is based on the NMCLL recognition method. In the first step the orientation of the stickers that belong on the left and right side of the cube is found. Then in the second step the user checks two pre-determined sticker positions. This recognition method was developed by James Straughan in 2021. Documentation of the recognition method was created by tsmosher[1].

ACRM Group.png

NMCLL

NMCLL is a recognition method developed for use in both normal solves and solves with non-matching blocks. In the first step the solver finds the orientation of the stickers that belong on the left and right layers. Then in step 2, the solver looks in pre-determined positions for matching stickers. Using the Roux method as an example for the pseudo use, if the right side block is built such that it doesn't match the left side block, recognition for the CMLL step is difficult. In this kind of pseudo solving, the U Sticker + Pattern system is difficult to recognize because the stickers that belong on the U layer are unknown and change once the puzzle enters a pseudo state. However, the NMCLL recognition system starts by finding the left and right side sticker orientation. These stickers don't change in simple pseudo situations. This recognition method was developed in 2010[2] by James Straughan.

NMCLL Recognition.png

Original NMCLL

This is the original recognition method for NMCLL. As in the modern NMCLL system above, the solver first finds the orientation of the stickers that belong on the left and right layers. But for step 2, the solver looks for the orientation of the stickers that belong on the U layer. For each left and right side sticker orientation, there can be up to four different U layer sticker orientations. Checking multiple locations to find this orientation, and the fact that the U stickers are unknown to the solver, means that this recognition isn't quick to recognize. This recognition method was developed starting in 2004[3] and through 2007[4] by Gilles Roux and James Straughan. The term "NMCMLL" was coined by Thom Barlow[5] for use in the Roux method. For more general application to methods other than the Roux method, the terms "NMCxLL" or "NMCLL" can also be used.

Original NMCLL Recognition.png

Hyperorientations

In this recognition method, the same as U Sticker + Pattern recognition, first the U sticker orientation is recognized. Then the user looks at the orientation of another set of stickers. This other set can be either the stickers that belong on the front and back layers or the stickers that belong on the left and right layers. This recognition method can be used for normal solving or pseudo situations where a single layer is offset by a half-turn. Using the same Roux method example, Hyperorientations works well for normal blocks and when the right side block is a pseudo block from an R2 away. But Hyperorientations doesn't well for other types of pseudo situations, such as a block in Roux that is an R or R' offset. This recognition method was developed in 2008 by Robert Smith.

Hyperorientations Recognition.png

See also

External links