Mehta

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Mehta method
Mehta.png
Information about the method
Proposer(s): Yash Mehta
Proposed: 2020
Alt Names:
Variants: Mehta-OS, Mehta-TDR
No. Steps: 4-5
No. Algs: Beginner: 18
One full path: 134-138
Mehta-OS: ~270
Mehta-TDR: 897
Avg Moves: Speed: 45-50 STM
Purpose(s):


Introduction

Mehta is a 3x3 speedsolving method proposed by Yash Mehta in 2020. It relies heavily on algorithms, resulting in a method which promises a high TPS for most of the solve. It also boasts a low movecount, comparable to Roux, but significantly less than CFOP.

Acronyms

  • FB - First Block
  • 3QB - 3 Quarters Belt
  • EOLE - Edge Orientation + Last Edge
  • 6CO - 6 Corners' Orientation
  • 6CP - 6 Corners' Permutation
  • L5EP - Last 5 Edges Permutation
  • TDR - Trang's DR block (DFR + DR + DBR pieces)
  • APDR - Andreas' Permutation of DR block
  • CDRLL - CxLL with DR edge unsolved
  • DCAL - D layer Corners After Ledge
  • JTLE - John Tamanas Last Edge (orients U corners + solves DR edge)

First Steps

1. FB: Solve a 1x2x3 block on the D layer, with 1x1x3 of the block in the DL position.

2a. 3QB: Solve 3 E-slice edges relative to the centers.

2b. EOLE: Insert the remaining E-slice edge while orienting all the edges. There are 55 cases that can be done intuitively or with algorithms.

Next Steps

Mehta-6CP
3. 6CO: Orient the 6 remaining corners using 71 algorithms

4. 6CP: Permute the 6 remaining corners using 47 algorithms

5. L5EP: Solve the cube by permuting the last 5 edges using 16 L5EP algorithms

(134 algorithms)

Mehta-APDR
3. 6CO: Orient the 6 remaining corners using 71 algorithms

4. APDR: Solve the DR block using 38 algorithms

5. PLL: Solve the top layer using 21 algorithms

(130 algorithms)

Mehta-CDRLL
3. DCAL: Solve the 2 corners of the D layer using 80 algorithms

4. CDRLL: Orient and permute the U layer corners (like COLL) using 42 algorithms

5. L5EP: Solve the cube by permuting the last 5 edges using 16 L5EP algorithms

(138 algorithms)

Mehta-JTLE
3. DCAL: Solve the 2 corners of the D layer using 80 algorithms

4. JTLE: Orient the U layer corners while inserting the DR edge using 34 algorithms

5. PLL: Solve the top layer using 21 algorithms

(135 algorithms)

Mehta-TDR
3. TDR: Solve the DR block using 350 algorithms.

4. ZBLL: Solve last layer using 493 algorithms.

(843 algorithms)

Mehta-OS

To be considered as knowing Mehta-OS, enough of the algorithms from the 4 major paths must be learned so that you can choose the best path for each solve. However, the CDRLL path is usually considered to be the main/best option, followed closely by the APDR/Seperation path. Most of the 6CP and JTLE algorithms are not the best, so these paths should only be used when a good case presents itself.

Pros + Cons

Pros

  • No rotations
  • Lower move count compared to other speed methods like CFOP or ZZ, comparable to Roux
  • 3 algorithmic steps instead of 2, allowing for higher TPS overall.
  • Ergonomics: roughly 40% of the solve is entirely <RUD> gen. Another 17% is a guaranteed <MU> gen or <RU> gen

Cons

  • Some 6CP and APDR algorithms have many R2 moves in a row. However, an advanced solver would be able to option-select to avoid bad cases.
  • Adjusting both faces at the end has a higher chance to get a +2 or DNF.
  • Transition between algorithmic steps is difficult to master.

Example Solves

Scramble: F D R2 D2 F B L F' R2 B2 D R2 D' L2 B2 D' L2 D' L2 B2 F

Mehta-6CP:
y2 x // Inspection
D U2 L2 B' // FB (4/4)
E R u' R u' R' // 3QB (6/10)
S' U S U' F R' F' R // EOLE (8/18)
U2 R U2 R' U R U' R' U' R U' R' // 6CO (12/30)
U' R2 D' R2 U R2 U' R2 U' D R2 U R2 // 6CP (13/43)
M' U' M2 U' M2 U' M' U2 M2 // L5EP (9/52)

Mehta-APDR:
y2 x // Inspection
D U2 L2 B' // FB (4/4)
E R u' R u' R' // 3QB (6/10)
S' U S U' F R' F' R // EOLE (8/18)
U2 R U2 R' U R U' R' U' R U' R' // 6CO (12/30)
U2 R2 U2 R2 // APDR (4/34)
U2 R U' R' U' R U R D R' U' R D' R' U2 R' // PLL (16/50)

Mehta-CDRLL:
y2 x // Inspection
D U2 L2 B' // FB (4/4)
E R u' R u' R' // 3QB (6/10)
S' U S U' F R' F' R // EOLE (8/18)
U' R' U R' U2 R U R // DCAL (8/26)
U R2 D R' U2 R D' R2 U' R U' R' // CDRLL (12/38)
R' U' R U R U R U' R' U' // L5EP (10/48)

Mehta-JTLE:
y2 x // Inspection
D U2 L2 B' // FB (4/4)
E R u' R u' R' // 3QB (6/10)
S' U S U' F R' F' R // EOLE (8/18)
U' R' U R' U2 R U R // DCAL (8/26)
R' U2 R2 U2 R U' R U' R' // JTLE (9/35)
U R U R' U' D R2 U' R U' R' U R' U R2 E // PLL (16/51)

Mehta-TDR:
y2 x // Inspection
D U2 L2 B' // FB (4/4)
E R u' R u' R' // 3QB (6/10)
S' U S U' F R' F' R // EOLE (8/18)
R U' R' U2 R U' R U R2 // TDR (9/27)
U2 R U R' B' U R U R' U' B U' R U' R' U' // ZBLL (16/43)

Mehta on other puzzles

  • An adaptation called Mehta-MH was designed by Matthew Hinton for big cubes. Mehta-MH is very similar to the OBLBL method, even though the creator was completely unaware of OBLBL until after Mehta-MH was developed. Variations of Mehta-MH exist for all sizes of cubes 4x4 and up, with the naming convention 'Mehta-MH{N}'.
  • Mehta is also applicable to the 2x2 and square-1, although it is uncertain whether it can compete with commonly used methods such as Ortega or Vandenbergh.

External Links