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What the hell? I practice doing crosses and now I'm slower?

RadicalRick

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Joined
Nov 6, 2020
Messages
31
I was doing fly-by my pants cross and getting approximately 60 sec solves give or take. Now I'm working on doing faster crosses looking up how-to, etc... Now my times have gotten worst? by 10 sec or more? How many out there experience this same problem before finally(I hope) getting better? Keep in mind I've only been doing cubing for around 4 months now give or take a week. So my beginner nerve just might have a lot to do with it?
 
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Joined
Oct 12, 2020
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In the park feeding Ducks
IMO it's like learning the cube for the first time. It's a new technique your not that used to and you mind needs to learn how to do it efficiently. It will come in time. Remember the No.1 saying in cubing : Sometimes you have to be slow to get fast.
I have never heard that before. I think the most well known quote is "Don't think, just solve" - Max Park

Now to the original question.

Maybe the quote doesn't seem relevant to your question at first but it goes along with it perfectly. When you're solving don't scold yourself for doing a bad cross or messing up an F2L slot, instead learn from your mistakes and know how to deal with it next time. If you have a bad solve and start having a negative mindset it can be discouraging and affect your times even more. When you start learning something new your mind must take it slowly as it needs to process this new information. As time goes on it becomes more and more ingrained. Soon you will start getting back to your old level, then as you get even better you can eventually surpass the old times.

A great example would be learning ZBLL, there is a ton of algorithms to remember and it can be hard to link the alg to the case at times. You can look at Tymon for example. Sometimes you'll notice he pauses to recognize a learned ZBLL and it may be even slower than if he just did OLL+PLL but as time goes on you see gradual improvement and it soon becomes worth it.

As said before a negative mindset will cause discouragement and make you question if you can ever achieve your goal. If you find yourself thinking this just ask yourself why your doing it in the first place. It's because it is better in the long run and without it you may never achieve full potential. It can in some circumstances takes hundreds of solve before the information is natural but after that you will be relieved as you have learned something that allows you to complete your goal in a way that was not possible before.

In CFOP cross is very essential as it's the building block of everything else. If you don't have a good cross you will also find it hard to look ahead into F2L which in turn will lead to bad look ahead and inefficiency in that step. Definitely don't give up in your quest to improve cross. Everybody must suffer before they can unlock a key step to mastery. Good luck.
 
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Dan the Beginner

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Jun 4, 2021
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319
Location
Australia
I have a similar experience and I started this four and a half months ago. Before I comment, may I ask what specific method (or algorithms) you are using and how long you have been using it? Is it possible that some new algorithm is slowing you down, instead of the cross?
 
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Dan the Beginner

Premium Member
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Jun 4, 2021
Messages
319
Location
Australia
agreed. It took me a month after learning beginner F2L to make it faster than than beginner 1st layer than 2nd layer

Thanks, it is helpful for us beginners to know your experience and realise that there are hurdles even for other much more advanced solvers. It takes serious time and effort to regain speed and to actually improve with new technique and algorithms.
 

RadicalRick

Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2020
Messages
31
I have a similar experience and I started this four and a half months ago. Before I comment, may I ask what specific method (or algorithms) you are using and how long you have been using it? Is it possible that some new algorithm is slowing you down, instead of the cross?
My crosses are around 10 to 15 seconds. I'm trying to get the Cross down to 4 to 8 seconds. I'm doing a white cross on top then flip the cubes and start with the corner (1st layer) then the 2nd layer. I figure if I'm going to really improve my speed I will have to start with one thing at a time. And the cross makes sense to start mastering that first.
 

RadicalRick

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Joined
Nov 6, 2020
Messages
31
*Shrug*
Well, that's what I heard
Yeah, I've heard that quote. But that's after you have mastered the moves. You can't solve it if you don't know the moves. So we beginners have to think before we can solve without thinking.
 

RadicalRick

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Joined
Nov 6, 2020
Messages
31
cross on the BOTTOM (practice those D moves) and practice inserting two or more edges at once
That's the part that's slowing me down. Trying to do the cross on the bottom. I've always done it from the top. But I can see how the bottom would be beneficial. So, that's what I'm practicing.
 

RadicalRick

Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2020
Messages
31
cross on the BOTTOM (practice those D moves) and practice inserting two or more edges at once
That's what I'm trying to do. Insert 2 edges at a time. As I look at it and see how I can do that, I start to grasp hows it's done. Now I'm trying to put it into practice.
 
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