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What is the best big cube (10x10+) center method

Discomantis

Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2022
Messages
10
Location
USA
Hello everyone! I was wondering what the best method is for solving centers on a big cube the size of about 10x10 or larger. I have seen a lot of methods, like j perm's 21x21 method, his method used on the 13x13, or just the normal method used on smaller cubes. Which one of these three methods should I use, because the first and second method make finding pieces easier, but they come at a cost of moves.
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2017
Messages
3
Hello everyone! I was wondering what the best method is for solving centers on a big cube the size of about 10x10 or larger. I have seen a lot of methods, like j perm's 21x21 method, his method used on the 13x13, or just the normal method used on smaller cubes. Which one of these three methods should I use, because the first and second method make finding pieces easier, but they come at a cost of moves.
Hi Discomantis, sorry for late reply but here is my opinion on this, based on my decent level and knowledge on this. I also include my opinion for other cube sizes, just for comparison.
(please note that I tested those until 15x15 but not above)
- 5x5 : use whatever you have to build a 2x3, either from a square, T, bolt or 2 1x3 bars
- 6x6 : use whatever you have to build a 2x4, mainly using 2 1x4 bars, or building 2 at once using 1x2 blocs and squares
- 7x7 : build 1x5 bars, ideally adjacent ones to reduce insertions involving slice moves
- 8x8 : 1x6 bars, order starts to be less important but if possible choose adjacent bars to reduce the number of insertions involving slice moves
- 9x9 : 1x7 bars, same remark as 8x8
- 10x10, 12x12, 14x14 : Jeremy Smith's technique (size = 4)
- 11x11, 13x13, 15x15 : Jeremy Smith's technique (size = 5)

Jeremy Smith's center technique is as follows (example is taken with a 10x10) : you consecutively build and insert 8 1x4 bars with the 4 middle pieces, then simply do a F move if you have put them on F center, and finish with the remaining 4 1x8 bars, 2 being on right and 2 being on left (ideally not starting with the very outer ones to reduce the number of insertions involving slice moves, as always). Note here that during the first phase to build the inner bars, the insertion order doesn't matter very much as the technique strength is partly based on the choice we can make between all possible bars.

For very big cubes (17x17+), if I remember correctly Jeremy Smith uses his techniques with bigger inner bars (size = 7 or even bigger instead of 5 for example). It seems fine to reduce the number of full bars but on the opposite side we build bigger objects and lose some efficiency related to the "statistical skips". I couldn't test different sizes on those bigger cubes, and tl be fully honest I cannot tell exactly which one is the best for each cube size, and from how much. It seems they are becoming equivalent while the cube size increases, but I'm not sure at all.
 
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