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Warm Water Treated Cubes

matthewc1202

Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2018
Messages
175
So last week i tried doing a experiment and worked on a gts 2 and it made the plastic more softer
im currently buying mf3rs and mf3rs 2 cubes to do
if the works out i will sell it
mf3rs :10 dollars
mf3rs 2 :15 dollars
i am thinking of selling it
shipping to the us only
4 dollars flat shipping everywhere in the us
 

cuber314159

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Dec 20, 2016
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2016EVAN06
I tried freezing cubes in ice and it does have some short lived benefits but it takes along time to get the ice to melt completely. As for heat, I completely wrecked my valk M by hair drying it, it still feels ok but is not comp legal as one of the centers was deformed so the center cap couldn't fit on.
 

4Chan

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Jun 21, 2008
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kkkkk guys, I can explain some potential reasons why this might work
I have some graduate level experience in materials science and chemistry

1. ABS plastic and it's additives are actually slightly hydrophillic, it's known in industry that when ABS pellets are stored in warm environments, the moisture in the atmosphere will absorb into the plastic. Plastic may seem waterproof, but that's because it only stores a small amount of water. By heating it, you might be able to get the plastic to absorb more water, BUT this effect will reach an equilibrium with the atmosphere around you. For example, if you live in an environment of 75 relative humidity, the cube will slowly lose water molecules and be very very slightly higher than the relative humidity around you.

2. If you're reaching 300-400F or 200C (Although higher than the boiling point of water, the bottom of the vessel can reach these temperatures), you're going through the glass transition phase of the plastic. When the plastic is injection molded, the rate of cooling can have an effect on the crystal structure of the plastic. (For example, you can tell that QiYi MoFangGe runs their molds hotter than other companies.) But then you might say, but ABS isn't a crystalline polymer! That's partially true, but the copolymers, additives, filler, and dyes DO have a crystalline structure, and do undergo changes in temperature. If you can reach the glass transition temperatures, the RATE OF COOLING will determine whether you're annealing, quenching, or normalising the material (read into heat treatments). Each of these processes will CHANGE THE FEELING OF THE PLASTIC

tl;dr: if the vessel is hot enough, it's likely that this is a heat treatment effect


Caveat: These are just possibilities, not actual truth. You'd need expensive lab tests to check crystal structure. Whatever works best for you, but I just prefer to coat the plastic with a better plastic.
 
Last edited:

matthewc1202

Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2018
Messages
175
kkkkk guys, I can explain some potential reasons why this might work
I have some graduate level experience in materials science and chemistry

1. ABS plastic and it's additives are actually slightly hydrophillic, it's known in industry that when ABS pellets are stored in warm environments, the moisture in the atmosphere will absorb into the plastic. Plastic may seem waterproof, but that's because it only stores a small amount of water. By heating it, you might be able to get the plastic to absorb more water, BUT this effect will reach an equilibrium with the atmosphere around you. For example, if you live in an environment of 75 relative humidity, the cube will slowly lose water molecules and be very very slightly higher than the relative humidity around you.

2. If you're reaching 300-400F or 200C (Although higher than the boiling point of water, the bottom of the vessel can reach these temperatures), you're going through the glass transition phase of the plastic. When the plastic is injection molded, the rate of cooling can have an effect on the crystal structure of the plastic. (For example, you can tell that QiYi MoFangGe runs their molds hotter than other companies.) But then you might say, but ABS isn't a crystalline polymer! That's partially true, but the copolymers, additives, filler, and dyes DO have a crystalline structure, and do undergo changes in temperature. If you can reach the glass transition temperatures, the RATE OF COOLING will determine whether you're annealing, quenching, or normalising the material (read into heat treatments). Each of these processes will CHANGE THE FEELING OF THE PLASTIC

tl;dr: if the vessel is hot enough, it's likely that this is a heat treatment effect


Caveat: These are just possibilities, not actual truth. You'd need expensive lab tests to check crystal structure. Whatever works best for you, but I just prefer to coat the plastic with a better plastic.
:) im testing it out right now on my valk 3
its working decently do yeah
 
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