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Torque on Conventional Cubes

BuildingBots

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2020
Messages
1
Hello,
I am a student doing a robotics project, you guessed it, a Rubik's cube solver!

The device will user linear solenoids to press grasping claws, rotated by steppers or servos, onto the cube faces.

Two questions:
-Does anyone know the torque required to turn the face of a standard Rubik's cube?
-Would you advise using a speed cube instead? Do you know the torque requirements for any specific models?

The project is mostly hardware oriented so if you have suggestions for software(probably run from a Raspberry-Pi 3) feel free to let me know.

Thank you!
 
Joined
Feb 23, 2019
Messages
614
Location
The FitnessGram Pacer Test is a multi stage...
Hello,
I am a student doing a robotics project, you guessed it, a Rubik's cube solver!

The device will user linear solenoids to press grasping claws, rotated by steppers or servos, onto the cube faces.

Two questions:
-Does anyone know the torque required to turn the face of a standard Rubik's cube?
-Would you advise using a speed cube instead? Do you know the torque requirements for any specific models?

The project is mostly hardware oriented so if you have suggestions for software(probably run from a Raspberry-Pi 3) feel free to let me know.

Thank you!
Unfortunately, I cannot tell you too much about the torque, but I can say that the force required to turn a Rubik’s Cube would be much more inconsistent across each of the faces. For this reason I would go with a speedcube of some sort to ensure that the torque required would be more even. Also, modern speedcubes have a way of adjusting the tensions on individual sides, which might affect the torque.

Good luck in your project!
 

SenorJuan

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2014
Messages
418
Location
U.K
Well you've made me do a quick experiment.
A speedcube, set up to be sticky/not-that-fast, ( for one-handed solving ), required a torque of 0.05 Nm to turn it.

You should be able to set up any reasonable speedcube to require 0.02 Nm, easily, with suitable tension adjustment / lubricant.
I recommend using a speedcube, there are many budget-priced ones that will be well suited to your project.
 

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