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Summary and Explanation of Memory Methods

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Threads that pose questions concerning memory methods for BLD solving pop up constantly in this sub-forum, and for those of us looking to have actual discussion, it can be very annoying to answer the same questions over and over again. The information that is requested is almost always already available, but finding it can be difficult. The "Memory Methods" thread is massive, and some of the posts in it are very outdated.

This thread is intended to be a reference for new BLD cubers. I will provide summaries of some of the common memory methods that are used, as well as helpful links to other sites/resources. I expect that you already know a BLD method and are comfortable with the concept of solving cycles of pieces.

NOTE: This post will only be useful if you use a method that solves the orientation and permutation of pieces at the same time, such as Old Pochmann, M2/R2, BH, etc. I have no experience using methods such as 3OP.

Contents:
1. Visual
2. Sentences
3. Images & Journey / Roman Rooms
4. Auditory (Sounds)


1. Visual

Visual memorization involves simply memorizing the cycles directly. One way to do this is to visualize an airplane or roller coaster track going from one sticker to the next, or tapping each sticker in sequence.

This is a very popular method. Perhaps the most common use of visual is memorizing the corners of a 3x3. Although some people can memorize 4x4s and even 5x5s using purely visual memo, most have difficulty memorizing large amounts of information using this technique.

When using multiple memory techniques to solve different types of pieces it is usually best to leave visual memorization to the end, then don the blindfold and solve those pieces immediately. This way you are less likely to forget what you have memorized.


2. Sentences

An easy way to memorize the cube is using stories or random sentences. These don't necessarily have to be coherent, just memorable. To do this, you should assign a letter to each sticker on your cube. There are endless lettering schemes that you can use, and many people prefer different ones. I recommend that you come up with one that feels right for you. An example of a predefined lettering scheme is Speffz.

To use this memory method you simply make up a story or sentence that will help you to recall the sequence of letters that correspond to the cycles you need to memorize.

For example, if your corner memorization is represented by the letters CTNCET, you might make use the sentence "CaTs are NiCe to EaT" to help you remember it.

It can sometimes be difficult to come up with a coherent story on the spot, depending on the string of letters that you happen to get. This can be avoided by preparing a list of words you might use for each single letter or pair of letters.

It might be a good time to mention that, for sentences, as well the techniques I will cover next, memorizing 2 letters at once like I did previously can help to condense your memorization. Using the same string of letters that I used in the last example, CTNCET, I could have also memorized one letter per word, such as "Cocky Tourists Need Carrots Every Tuesday", which might be easier but is not as efficient and as a result may take more time.

3. Journey / Roman Rooms

Chris Hardwick has a page that explains this technique:

http://www.speedcubing.com/chris/memo-images.html


4. Sounds

Once again, Chris Hardwick has a great page on this technique:

http://www.speedcubing.com/chris/memo-words.html
 
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Cubenovice

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#3
You do know that eventually this thread may become just as large as the original memory method thread?
Bur perhaps it could work if you keep editing the first post with all the most important info from further down the thread :)

Some things you may want to edit / include:

- links to some of the best pages in the original thread for various subjects
- Splitting images from journey as Chuck suggested, I use letter pair images but do not (yet) place them into a journey. I just make a story.
- You could make a seperate topic about the various possibilities for "coding" stickers with letters or images
 
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#5
For visual, this is how I started, I simply tap the stickers going through all the cycles repeatedly until it is within my temporary muscle memory. I can do this without tapping but it is pretty difficult for me to do so far.
 
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#9
LarsN can memo a 7x7x7 visual :)
True, but no succesful solves so far. Mainly because of execution mistakes though.

What I do is look for patterns and symmetri which function as a kind of supporting pillar through the memo. It's not easy to explain. And then I repeat a lot like Tyjet66 mentions, but you can do that fast with visual memo so it's not that big a deal on big cubes.
 
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#10
A 7x7x7 visual? wtf :eek:
I'm trying to memorize the corners only for 3x3x3 and i have to repeat alot, so i use like 2 min memorizing. I have seen videos of people doing it in like 10 seconds. I just don't understand how it's possible. Is this one of those things that will improve with practice or should i change method?

What I do is I tap the pieces and remember the first letter of the color to know the orientation. I learned it from Erik Limeback, but i have the feeling that i'm doing something wrong (or i just have a very bad memory =/)
 
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#11
Krible, with practice, you become better at recognizing where pieces need to go and faster at memorizing the location. I'm far from an expert, but after trying different methods, visual is by far the most efficient for me.
 

RTh

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#13
Some days ago I started solving BLD, and I didn't know which method I should use to memorize the position of the pieces. So, I ''developed'' a simple system. First I classified the adjustment moves needed into 0, 1 and 2. 0 when it's in place, 1 when X kind of adjustment is needed, and 2 when we need the inverse to 1.

Then, assigned a simple cycle of words (mostly just random sounds) easy to memorize to the corners and edges.

So, I memorize the position to which the buffer piece needs to go and the adjustments needed, and so on.

Like: Gu2, Ja0, Mo1, Lol1, etc etc.

And then for the corners I use entire words, so:

Acid0, Book2, Guitar2, etc.

I have just solved the cube BLD twice, and I finished both solves (+2 the first one, still counts...) with nearly 1 minute and a half memo for each solve. I just find it so ''easy'' to remember with this system.

I'm thinking anyway of changing the number part, since including numbers makes it a bit more difficult, but I don't know what to use instead.

Hope I was of some help.

(Sorry about any mistake in grammar).
 
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#14
Some days ago I started solving BLD, and I didn't know which method I should use to memorize the position of the pieces. So, I ''developed'' a simple system. First I classified the adjustment moves needed into 0, 1 and 2. 0 when it's in place, 1 when X kind of adjustment is needed, and 2 when we need the inverse to 1.

Then, assigned a simple cycle of words (mostly just random sounds) easy to memorize to the corners and edges.

So, I memorize the position to which the buffer piece needs to go and the adjustments needed, and so on.

Like: Gu2, Ja0, Mo1, Lol1, etc etc.

And then for the corners I use entire words, so:

Acid0, Book2, Guitar2, etc.

I have just solved the cube BLD twice, and I finished both solves (+2 the first one, still counts...) with nearly 1 minute and a half memo for each solve. I just find it so ''easy'' to remember with this system.

I'm thinking anyway of changing the number part, since including numbers makes it a bit more difficult, but I don't know what to use instead.

Hope I was of some help.

(Sorry about any mistake in grammar).
Congratulations on successes right from the start! And seriously, 1,5 minutes on your first try, that's very low memo time. You timed the execution as well?

In order to try to help you (even thou it seems like you're doing quite well on your own), what solving method do you use? And why is the numbers necessary at all? Is "Guitar" one cornerpiece, and 0, 1 or 2 is for knowing the orientation? Would it be possible to change "Guitar0" to just "Guitar", "Guitar1" to "Ghost", and "Guitar2" to "Garlic", or something in that way? (Most people use one image or letter per sticker).
 

RTh

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#15
Congratulations on successes right from the start! And seriously, 1,5 minutes on your first try, that's very low memo time. You timed the execution as well?

In order to try to help you (even thou it seems like you're doing quite well on your own), what solving method do you use? And why is the numbers necessary at all? Is "Guitar" one cornerpiece, and 0, 1 or 2 is for knowing the orientation? Would it be possible to change "Guitar0" to just "Guitar", "Guitar1" to "Ghost", and "Guitar2" to "Garlic", or something in that way? (Most people use one image or letter per sticker).
Well, I practiced some memorization before the first solve, so it was very easy to create this sequence of positions. And I use Pochman to solve BLD.

The 0, 1 or 2 stands for:

0= No adjustment needed
1= The adjustment is the fastest one to move ''Guitar'' to the buffer target.
2= The adjustment is the same as 1 but inverting the orientation.

I included the 0,1,2 system since I don't want any kind of thinking process through the memo (at least not more than classifying the adjustment) . So I just know the 2 ways to adjust each position.
I also thought of changing the 1, and I think I will. So the first kind of adjustment will be the position itself.

But using a word for each sticker... I thought and still think it's too much. The goal with this random words was to make it easy to remember. For example using UR UL BD, etc. seems hard to remember.

For the corners I first used the same system as for the edges, but now that you suggested it, I think I'll try using 0, 1 and 2 for the orientation. This way I'll choose the adjustment while solving and gain some time.

And the whole first solve was almost 5 minutes, and the second one was 4'5 min. Pretty satisfied with the results. But need to practice soooo much. Edit: I had 3 DNF solves while I was learning Pochman, xD.

And thanks =]
 
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#16
i don't completely understand. I use (or am going to use because i cant bld just yet) the pochman method (edges, parity then corners). For edges I memorize by giving each sticker there letter.(red=r, green=g. etc.) Then I make a word for that edge piece (like GRass or RaG) depending on orientation. Finally, I make a story.

So what should I do for corners? I want something similar. I like stories and that type of memorizing method. :)
 
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#19
just start trying do blind fold 2x2

well, i'm still newbie here,
looks like still have a lot thing to learn..
 

Zane_C

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#20
I just made some additions to the BLD Memorization article. There are now the sub-headings: Letters, Letter pair images, Audio pairs and Letter pair words.

Hopefully I didn't make it too messy, the previous section just seemed way too vague with 'Letter pairs'. The page still needs some work and there isn't yet a description of sentence memo.
 

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