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[Unofficial] SirDuctTape 3x3 AO5 30.24

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[vimeo]97836928[/vimeo]

Times: (34.97), 27.85, (23.05), 32.35, 30.52

Cube: Weilong V1

I Know full PLL, about 1/3 of the Olls, and 6 Colls. Please tell me what I need to do to improve.

Thanks!

Also, I apologize that my hand was covering up the cube most of the time, but I think It looks pretty well considering that my camera was Duct Taped to a stack of books!
 
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#3
i don't want to sound really negative but you shouldn't have learned PLL this aerly and get this fast cube at this speed. you should learn advanced cross (wich means to do the cross in about 6 moves and not in 16 ;P) and work a bit on you're lookahead.
 
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#6
i don't want to sound really negative but you shouldn't have learned PLL this aerly and get this fast cube at this speed. you should learn advanced cross (wich means to do the cross in about 6 moves and not in 16 ;P) and work a bit on you're lookahead.
There's no proof that having a fast cube as a beginner will necessarily make your times worse. In fact there are some obvious advantages of starting out with a good cube. For example, you'll be less likely to get repetitive strain injuries. The whole idea that a beginner should use a beginner cube is hogwash.

I agree that he needs to work on look-ahead, but I also disagree about learning PLL this early. As long as he's learning the PLLs with proper fingertricks, where's the harm in that?
 
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#7
There's no proof that having a fast cube as a beginner will necessarily make your times worse. In fact there are some obvious advantages of starting out with a good cube. For example, you'll be less likely to get repetitive strain injuries. The whole idea that a beginner should use a beginner cube is hogwash.

I agree that he needs to work on look-ahead, but I also disagree about learning PLL this early. As long as he's learning the PLLs with proper fingertricks, where's the harm in that?
if you start with a worse cube you will learn accuracy and if you go straight to a fast cube you will most likely be like : oh t cube can already cut 45 degrees so i don't really have to care about turning alright.

also what i meant is when you are a 30-35 second solver you shouldn't really concentrate on LL but more on look ahea and cross.
 
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#9
if you start with a worse cube you will learn accuracy and if you go straight to a fast cube you will most likely be like : oh t cube can already cut 45 degrees so i don't really have to care about turning alright.

also what i meant is when you are a 30-35 second solver you shouldn't really concentrate on LL but more on look ahea and cross.
There is NO reason to focus on "accuracy". In fact, I'd probably say pretty much the opposite. You should be trying to take advantage of a cube's performance. If the cube cuts 40+ degrees when you're turning, it makes no sense to spend the time making sure the layer's are lined up. Accuracy is the WRONG thing to focus on. The correct thing is preciseness, which is exactly why you should be starting on a good cube. You want your fingertricks to become precise without having unlearn all the bad habits you'd get from using a bad cube.

Plus, it's also a waste of money to get a bunch of "beginner" cubes. If Sir Duct Tape wants to use a weilong, there's nothing wrong with that, and the only reason it would negatively affect his performance is if it was too fast for him. If that's the case, it's solved simply by over-lubricating it.
 
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#10
You shouldn't have learned full PLL so early. That probably delayed your progress by a lot. If you had instead focused your time and energy on your f2l you'd be faster now. So start back at the beginning and concentrate on f2l.
 
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#12
i don't want to sound really negative but you shouldn't have learned PLL this aerly and get this fast cube at this speed. you should learn advanced cross (wich means to do the cross in about 6 moves and not in 16 ;P) and work a bit on you're lookahead.


You shouldn't have learned full PLL so early. That probably delayed your progress by a lot. If you had instead focused your time and energy on your f2l you'd be faster now. So start back at the beginning and concentrate on f2l.
Do not listen to either of these things. They are both very short-sighted ways of looking at cubing.

If you learn PLL early, it will slow your progress, sure, but once you learn PLL, you get to practice it on every single solve. I learned CMLL (42 algorithms) when I was at around 45 seconds, and now I'm extremely comfortable with recognition of all of my CMLL cases. If I listened to this kind of advice, I'd have waited until now to start learning CMLL, and I'd be struggling the memorization. As it stands, I probably have 3000 solves done since learning full CMLL, meaning I have the experience of doing CMLL 3000 times. Did it slow me down before? Sure, but it makes me a lot better now. The only people who should not learn PLL early are people who are going to get frustrated if their times don't drop quickly. If you realize how important PLL will be later, learn it as early as you want.

As for the cube thing. I think it's ridiculous to assume that using a bad cube makes you a better cuber somehow. I don't think a WeiLong helps you more than a SuLong when your times are at 1 minute, but it certainly doesn't hurt you either.
 
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#13
If you learn PLL early, it will slow your progress, sure, but once you learn PLL, you get to practice it on every single solve. I learned CMLL (42 algorithms) when I was at around 45 seconds, and now I'm extremely comfortable with recognition of all of my CMLL cases. If I listened to this kind of advice, I'd have waited until now to start learning CMLL, and I'd be struggling the memorization. As it stands, I probably have 3000 solves done since learning full CMLL, meaning I have the experience of doing CMLL 3000 times. Did it slow me down before? Sure, but it makes me a lot better now. The only people who should not learn PLL early are people who are going to get frustrated if their times don't drop quickly. If you realize how important PLL will be later, learn it as early as you want.
I completely agree with this
 
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Thread starter #14
I thank all of you for your input. Personally, I think I am going to stay with a weilong because I feel that it is not to fast, and that the corner cutting won't negatively affect my times. Thanks again!
 
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#15
solify your f2l. you should be able to do each pair blindfolded. also, if a case is taking you 12 or more moves to solve (including rotations) then learn an alg for it, or find a more efficient way to do it.
 
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