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Share your history

Joined
May 31, 2016
Messages
135
This thread is to share your history. I'll start:

It started with learning the ruwix's beginner's method. I used it for a long time.

After a long time, I learned a different beginner's method (orient first instead of edges first) just for fun. I ended up grabbing Sune, Anti-Sune, F U R U' R' F' and F R U R' U' F' to orient corners, M U' M' U2 M U' M' U2 and F U R U' R' F' y2 F U R U' R' F' to orient edges, F2 R U R' F2 L D' L D L2 (J-perm) to permute corners and M2 U' M' U2 M U' M2 (U-perm, replace U' with U for CCW), M2 U' M2 U2 M2 U' M2 (H-perm) to permute edges. From legoboyz3!'s favorite PLLs video I learned E-perm to help me with diagonal corner swap. Later I was curious about 2-look OLL and PLL, so I learned it. It was nice to see Z-perm algorithm, as well as 1-look OCLL. This later evolved into full PLL, and I learned G-perm thanks to a post by FCM (Fast Cube Master) in his favorite algs thread (F2 M2 D R2 D' R2 U R2 U' Rw2 F2).
 

Matt11111

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I got a Rubik's Cube for Christmas and started to learn how to solve it. The next day I spent the day with my grandmother, where I solved it for the first time. My brother also got his own Rubik's Cube, so you already know I have to solve his all the heckin time.

After a while I decided to work on learning CFOP, and well, I still haven't learned full OLL to this day, nearly 4 years after learning how to solve the cube in the first place. I haven't been cubing as much as I used to, but maybe I'll grind some algs one weekend or something. Thanksgiving break is coming up, so you never know.
 

Reed Merrill

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May 14, 2017
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I really like the idea of this thread! It will be really cool to see what different people have done to learn how to speedsolve.

This thread is to share your history. I'll start:

It started with learning the ruwix's beginner's method. I used it for a long time.

After a long time, I learned a different beginner's method (orient first instead of edges first) just for fun. I ended up grabbing Sune, Anti-Sune, F U R U' R' F' and F R U R' U' F' to orient corners, M U' M' U2 M U' M' U2 and F U R U' R' F' y2 F U R U' R' F' to orient edges, F2 R U R' F2 L D' L D L2 (J-perm) to permute corners and M2 U' M' U2 M U' M2 (U-perm, replace U' with U for CCW), M2 U' M2 U2 M2 U' M2 (H-perm) to permute edges. From legoboyz3!'s favorite PLLs video I learned E-perm to help me with diagonal corner swap. Later I was curious about 2-look OLL and PLL, so I learned it. It was nice to see Z-perm algorithm, as well as 1-look OCLL. This later evolved into full PLL, and I learned G-perm thanks to a post by FCM (Fast Cube Master) in his favorite algs thread (F2 M2 D R2 D' R2 U R2 U' Rw2 F2).

That's a cool history since right from being a beginner you already knew the sunes. I bet that helped with expanding your algs later on.

I got a cube about 1.5 years ago and thought that I didn't need the beginners method, so taught myself cross on bottom, and then went straight to Ruwix's site and started trying to learn F2L algs. This was before I knew that youtube was full of awesome cubing resources, so I just did F2L algs until I eventually could see how the pairings worked, basically teaching myself intuitive F2L, which took months. Then I started learning 4LLL from Badmephisto's site. About 6 months after starting I could solve with pure 4LLL, and my family thought it was really funny that I still hadn't solved the cube at all that whole time.

Fast forward a bit, I did a couple of months of Roux, but didn't end up liking it, then I learned full PLL after switching back to CFOP. The I realized that with 4LLL I already knew OCLL, and if I learned ZZ then I could do full 2LLL. So I learned EOline, and haven't look back since.
 
Joined
May 31, 2016
Messages
135
That's a cool history since right from being a beginner you already knew the sunes. I bet that helped with expanding your algs later on.
One of my first beginner's method expansions was the extra algorithms on http://puzzlesolver.com/puzzle.php?id=29;page=8. Also I discovered an algorithm F R U R' U' F' R' U' F' U F R that will swap two opposite edges, without need to use 2 sunes.

It was interesting to find on youcandothecube.com tutorial that the sune was used for orienting corners instead of permuting edges. That inspired me to learn beginner's method in a different order. Later I realized it would make 2-look OLL and 2-look PLL easier, so I expanded it to 2-look OLL and 2-look PLL, and later to PLL.

I recommend learning an orient-first beginner's algorithm to help transition to CFOP. For orienting, try learning stage 5 of the youcandothecube tutorial: https://www.youcandothecube.com/solve-it/3-x-3-solution
For permuting, you should look for PLLs (https://www.speedsolving.com/wiki/index.php/PLL). Learn at least 2 algorithms: an adjacent corner swap or 3-cycle (A-, F-, G-, J-, R- or T-perm) and an edge 3-cycle (U-perm); find algorithms that you find easiest to remember. For example, in my case the adjacent swap was J-perm and it swapped left corners: F2 R U R' F2 L D' L D L2.
 

cros107

Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2017
Messages
7
Picked up a cube on a school trip in China to entertain myself during the long periods of time we spent on trains. Spent an hour or so learning beginner's method (also from Ruwix). Solved as much as possible for the rest of the trip. Got a GTS2M when I returned home, and a couple months later switched to Roux. This was only about a month ago so I'm still pretty slow (40s average) but I'm steadily improving.
 

Tabe

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I got a cube in 1980 or 81. I got frustrated with it as I couldn't do more than one side. Eventually picked up a book ("The Simple Solution to Rubik's Cube") and, with assistance from my mom, was able to solve the cube. Not long after that, I added a Rubik's Cube Deluxe (tiles) to my regular Rubik's. Still have the Deluxe 35+ years later.

I watched Minh Thai compete on "That's Incredible" back in the day, first to win the US championship and later to win the first World Championship.

Across multiple moves and life events, I would occasionally go back to the cube and solve it a couple times, just to remind myself I still could. Never tried to be fast. The only time I ever tried to be fast at all was in middle school when I raced my math teacher. He would work on a cube in-between periods and I challenged him (and won).

About a year ago, Amazon recommended the book "Cracking the Cube" to me. Intrigued, I bought it. A few months ago, I actually read it and I was deeply fascinated by the speedcubing scene. I decided to pick up my old Deluxe cube and start practicing. That worked for a little while but I soon decided I needed something better, so I bought a Weilong GTS (by accident - I intended to buy an Aolong v2 and hit the buy it now on Ebay on the wrong auction, LOL).

Since that time, I've gotten better but I don't get a ton of time to practice. I first continued using the method outlined in "Simple Solution" before switching to a beginner version of CFOP as detailed on Feliks's Cubeskills site. I have switched over to 2-look OLL and PLL and I continue to (slowly) improve.

I had one main goal when I started practicing and that was to beat my record from way back in the day as a 9-year old - 30 seconds. Back then, *EVERYONE* had a Rubik's cube but I was literally the only kid in school who could solve it. Other kids would bring their cubes to school and I would charge a quarter each to solve them. A quarter bought a candy bar back then so I figured that was pretty good pay for me :) Anyway, I got timed once on a lucky scramble and finished in 30 seconds. So my goal was to beat that time, which I have done.

Anyway, that's my story :)
 

efattah

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Joined
Feb 14, 2016
Messages
609
I got a cube in 1980 or 81.
I watched Minh Thai compete on "That's Incredible" back in the day, first to win the US championship and later to win the first World Championship.
:)

I also got my first cube in 80/81, before they even were sold in North America! My dad got one in Hungary on a business trip! With no books it took me a year to solve it age 6/7 (I developed a method to solve it without any algorithms that I have posted elsewhere here). Like Tabe I also watched That's Incredible in 1981/82 and watched Minh Thai win it. I was the only one in my school who could solve it, and several times I avoided getting beaten up by older kids when I told them I could solve it (and of course they had me prove it).

Eventually I got decently fast, averaged around 40 seconds in 1988 with the ultra-crappy cubes of the day with a PB single of 19.8 in 1987. Started speed cubing in late 2015, developed the LMCF method based on my old 80's style, and currently average around 15 seconds with occasional sub-10 solves. I also got Rubik's revenge and the earliest Megaminx back in 1982/83, I was able to solve Rubik's Revenge (4x4) 50% of the time (only if I didn't get parity). Square-1 was beyond my ability back then. Could never get past parity (not surprising for an 8 year old with no books or internet...)
 

greentgoatgal

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Feb 6, 2017
Messages
734
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US
I got a cube as a Christmas gift in 2016. Learned to solve it LBL within a couple hours. Memorized all the algs by the next day.

I got a 2x2, 4x4, pyraminx, megaminx, and square 1 between then and March 2017. I averaged around 1:20s with a PB around 50s.

Then I happened upon speedsolving.com and decided to get into actual speed cubing. Had to ditch all the ShengShous.

I learned f2l, oll, and pll, and got a valk 3 m over the summer. I didn't learn about 4lll until after I was done learning full 2lll, so I went straight from LBL to full CFOP.

And now I average 15s with a PB of 9.72.
 

CubeRed

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All right, time to bump this thread.

My first cube I got my hands on was a cheap cube from a grocery store. What you might call a "dollar cube". I was at Korea back then (2018). After I bought it I was interested and played around with it a few times to get an understanding of the cube. I knew the aspect of "layers" and once even got 2 layers on both sides! I thought it would solve the cube, but unfortunately it didn't.

After a while I gave in to the tutorial and learnt a slight modification to the LBL method. It was fun times. But I never thought of timing myself and the cube slowly faded away.

2021
After moving to NZ, school had started. After a few days, a kid brought a 3x3 to school and solved it in front of the class in about 1 minute. I was inspired. I came back from school and immediately picked up my forgotten cube. After a long break I had to relearn it but I was determined.

Progress was fast. After mastering the beginner method in 3 hours I would practice every day for hours. Next it was beginner CFOP. Then 4LLL. My times were dropping and motivation was strong. After about 4.5 months I was averaging sub 30. A few days later was my first sub 20 single. Then my Ao5. Soon I had learnt PLL. I kept going.

Now, after 7~8 months practicing the cube, I average 18 seconds globally with a best single of 11.54. I now own a 4x4. I have attended a competition in Hamilton and reaching out to other events. I am happy that I am part of this wonderful community. Thank you.
 

Neatcubing

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Joined
Jul 3, 2021
Messages
102
Location
Malaysia
I like the concept of this thread.I guess I'll go next.

I got my first cube back in May 18 2021, just a few months ago.I learned from CUBASTIC beginner tutorial over the course of 3 days.I found myself a few days later to want to start speedsolving,after I saw that Justin Bieber could solve a cube faster than me.

I experimented on the cube,found out about reverse sexy on my own and started implementing it in my solves.A week later I was averaging 1 minute and 30 seconds, and I decided to learn CFOP.I found J Perm's channel and I started learning.

Fast forward 2 months and I made an account on the speedsolving forum and made a few friends.I was averaging 35 seconds.I competed every week in the weekly comps and my time was continuously dropping.

I started my progression thread in hope to beat @CubeRed to the sub 20 barrier.Unfortunately, I became busy with irl stuff and couldn't practise as much and my times started increasing again (and the factory lube in my cube started drying out aswell).

A week or two later,I was averaging 26 ish seconds.At this time I also received my first 4x4 and 2x2.(Also when the duck revolution began.)

And this is my cubing journey so far.Its been ~4 months and I am enjoying this hobby a lot.

I also realized cubing was a really expensive hobby
 

MJbaka

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Joined
Jun 3, 2021
Messages
154
Location
Idaho
I learned how to solve a cube when I was eight but after doing so did not pay much attention to it afterwards. When I was in sixth grade I saw my cube sitting on my shelf and decided to see if I could still solve it. I could, and so the next day I brought it up to my cousin's house. My cousin showed me the dot pattern and the checkerboard pattern and I immediately became interested by patterns. I learned about 100 algorithms for different patterns with no interest in actually getting faster at the cube. All I cared about was making new patterns and learning new algorithms for patterns. I would spend hours repeating triggers until I saw something pattern-like. Eventually I learned what I felt was all the patterns I could learn and got bored because I could not find more patterns. Eventually I got bored and stopped. In eighth grade a friend of mine brought a 4x4 to school and I got excited and brought my cube to school. I was jealous of him because he could solve his cube in 30 seconds and it took me like 45 seconds on the beginners method, so naturally I wanted to get faster than him. I started by learning the 7 cross OLL's, and then had my friend teach mean basic F2L. As I started to learn PLL, I intuitively optimized all my F2L cases to make them faster, and thus I never had to look at an F2L sheet or video, which helped me improve way faster. Within three months of cubing I had become sub-20, and by the end of four months I had become sub-15. I was improving fast and wanted to improve faster. However, after that I hit a block and haven't improved much since then. After six months of cubing, I now average 12 seconds, so yeah, that's my history.
 
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2 years ago, I got my second rubik's cube because when I was about to move from the US, I gave my old one to my cousin. I could barely solve that one. I asked for a magnetised QiYi Warrior W, and I got it on my 4th day of school. Obviously I didn't bring it to schol, but when I got it, it was absolutely drenched. So I wiped it off and continued. Fast forward a month, I still couldn't solve it but I tried. Then came the time of my first semester exams and Math rolled around. I was so dumb, that I had the nerve to play with my cube, inside my book, right in front of my dad. Suffice to say that he saw me and the cube was thrown onto the ground. So that's that. After that, I just left for a while. Keep in mind that I didn't know about speedcubing during that time. I came back around two months after that little incident and cubed for a bit. I downloaded a timer app, used a book as my mat and started cubing. No matter how hard I tried, I kept getting stuck on the last step. One day, when I was about to go to my grandparent's house, I had my first success (by twisting the corners). After that visit, I just cubed and cubed. Then came around the time of my end of year exams and I left again, but this time for a longer time. 1 year after my end of year exams ended, in December 2020, I stumbled upon my cube. This time, I was determined to solve it, the proper way. I watched J Perm's beginner tutorial. As time passed, I began to grow faster. I went from 1 minute to 50 seconds to 45 to 35. I was stuck at this 35 stage for a long time. So, I asked my mom if I could get a cube, and I got the MoYu MFJS RS3M 2020 edition. From there, I cubed and cubed and cubed and got to Sub 27. One day, I just woke up, had a normal day, and started cubing. To my surprise, I was constantly getting Sub 23 solves. And that's where I am today. Getting Sub 22s, an occasional 19 or a rare 16.
 

abunickabhi

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I was always perplexed by the Rubik’s Cube, and my perception keeps changing as I grow older. At first, it used to be a great feat just to solve one side, upon which I stayed satisfied for years, then one day I learned how to solve it completely by looking up an online tutorial.

Doing the cube blindfolded was the next challenge which I took up, which took me another four years to get the hang of, and I did it by leapfrogging from the Old Pochmann method to using M2/R2 in my solves. As the years went by, I slowly and steadily replaced each inefficient M2/R2 algorithm with a newer and faster 3-style algorithm.
Another breakthrough in the blind scene came with the US BLDers smashing the blindfold times, by making really fast 3-style algorithms. This was the turning point, as TPS and thinkahead and better algs became the primary thing to invest time into.

It was again in the lockdown induced in the year 2020 due to the COVID pandemic that I understood the parallels between chess and cubing and realised that cubing does not have the intense opening preparation that normal classical chess have. Even speedchess has a lot of preparation at the titled players level. Having a lot of cases evaluated beforehand is a very new thing to cubing, as it was new to the chess world in the 1950s when Botvinnik introduced intense chess preparation and methodology that is widely adopted today by all professional chess players. Cubing is still new and the viability of having such preparation is shrugged off as a waste of time, as cubing records are still optimized on fingertricks, lookahead/pattern recognition, TPS and lots of practice.

I attended my first major competition at the Asian Championships in Beijing in 2016. It was an amazing experience, and the major takeaway I had from the tournament was the impact I got from three cubers, who seemed to be on another level: Shivam Bansal, Kaijun Lin, and Gianfranco Huanqui. Kaijun Lin had already inspired me to take up the Roux method as my main solving method, and he had shown how BLD times are brought to such low and consistent times with practice and focus.

Gianfranco Huanqui is a revolutionary BLDer, who has made new kinds of finger tricks and made many new algs which are novel and fluently executable. On the final day of the Asians, Gianfranco Huanqui did over 300 3BLD solves in one day at the venue. I had lost count of the sub-20s, sub-18s he got and it was spectacular to watch him practice. In every solve, he looked at a point where he thought he could have improved, and continued self-learning in this way.

I also remember Shivam Bansal saying a mind-blowing fact after the prize distribution that, our mind is so powerful that we technically should be able to store petabytes worth of information in it which is even more than a supercomputer or a cluster of computer harnesses. By having such brain power the limits of MBLD is unreachable , he said. After the competition, I headed back to Chennai in India, feeling more driven to create something new. The next month (Nov 2016), I finally thought of taking the plunge into making a new method that I had always thought of but never did. I had decided to list out and memorize all the 5 cycle algorithms for 3x3, for both corners and edges, and also get some 4 cycle comms which come handy in finishing off edges in most of the cases and new parity algs. I wanted to make a memory element for each letter quad which could be retrieved doubly faster than 2 letter pairs, and I wanted a 12ish move count finger trick-able 5-cycle algorithm that could solve the case in the fastest time and with very less finger movement.

If I could have mained 3BLD as my main event, I would have never delved into complexities like 5-style. It is only logical to improve your TPS and fingertricks and get more into the flow state when you are maining 3BLD. It was mainly memorizing the dedges on the big cubes on the 4x4 and 5x5, which was becoming a bit difficult, as there are 23 targets, and it was super tough to get the flow with dedge memo and make it stick. I had the idea of if I adopt a system like letter quads, it will help solve the problem of dedge memo not being fluid. My motivation for trying out letter quads in the first place was wings on big cubes. Sometimes there are trash targets, and letter pairs don't stick. If I had been doing only 3BLD, I would have always done letter pairs, and would have found letter quads super unnecessary.

I was attending Shaastra Open 2014, my second ever WCA competition. I was 18 years old at that time and had just finished a 4/8 MBLD attempt which felt quite satisfying. The competition went well, and I came second in 3BLD with a time of 2: 06, behind Kabyanil Talukdar who got a 1:20. After the prize distribution ceremony, Arunachaleswarar, an overzealous skewber, who did blindfolded Skewb solves by insane tracking, saw me doing M U M’ U’ on a 3x3. I showed him that these 4 moves are so efficient that they cycle 5 pieces without affecting the rest of the pieces. He added to me saying that, you should make a whole system out of this idea. I shrugged it off saying it's just too hard as there are many cases, running into over a million unique cases. The same day, earlier I talked to the MBLD winner Vikram Mada who did 6/6 using only single letter memorization (not even letter pairs) and discussed with him conveying how I wish to go beyond letter pairs and go to letter quads. I quickly calculated the number and said a quarter million cases. He said that this just looks impossible, saying that he was already having a tough time transitioning to 480 letter pairs and there I was talking about an algset that runs into a hundred thousand cases. I went back to college and borrowed a big Scrabble book from the library to just see how many 4 letter words exist out there, there were a lot but not enough to cover all the cases of letter quads which can emerge on a 3x3.

TLDR, my cubing journey has been super satisfying. I wish to get WR in MBLD with 5-style one day though.
 

LBr

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May 2, 2021
Messages
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Running away from the feral ducks in my local park
2.5years ago, a classmate brought a cube in (it was a v cube 3 lolol) and could solve it in 2 minutes. Then after a short time everyone would bring their cubes to him to be solved. Slowly over the summer of that year (2019) I learned the beginner method and through the autumn I mirrored the algs and got sub 40 by November. I stalled and lost interest after Christmas, But in april, with covid, I learned full PLL in a month and 2 look OLL as well. Over the summer, I finished all the non dot OLL, and learned basic F2L and struggled at first but pulled through, and became sub 20 very fast. By the end of the summer, I averaged 17-18. And by November I got my average down to 15.

And then I quit again and didn't pick up a cube until late March of this year, and all of my lookahead was gone and I was quite hacked off, after 2-3 weeks I got my average back to normal and in April/May managed to get my first ever sub 10 time. I also practiced 4x4 a lot during this time, and went from averaging 1:35 to sub 1 in 2 months. I became sub 4 on 2x2 as well by pretty much finishing CLL. I decided to join the forums to keep my interest going and make sure I don't quit. I went to Leatherhead 2021 (unofficial) and got a really good 3x3 final average. I am now learning full ELL so that when I get a trash OLL, I can do CLL and be fine.

P.S In November please spam my profile so I don't take another break,

LBr
 

LBr

Member
Joined
May 2, 2021
Messages
261
Location
Running away from the feral ducks in my local park
I was always perplexed by the Rubik’s Cube, and my perception keeps changing as I grow older. At first, it used to be a great feat just to solve one side, upon which I stayed satisfied for years, then one day I learned how to solve it completely by looking up an online tutorial.

Doing the cube blindfolded was the next challenge which I took up, which took me another four years to get the hang of, and I did it by leapfrogging from the Old Pochmann method to using M2/R2 in my solves. As the years went by, I slowly and steadily replaced each inefficient M2/R2 algorithm with a newer and faster 3-style algorithm.
Another breakthrough in the blind scene came with the US BLDers smashing the blindfold times, by making really fast 3-style algorithms. This was the turning point, as TPS and thinkahead and better algs became the primary thing to invest time into.

It was again in the lockdown induced in the year 2020 due to the COVID pandemic that I understood the parallels between chess and cubing and realised that cubing does not have the intense opening preparation that normal classical chess have. Even speedchess has a lot of preparation at the titled players level. Having a lot of cases evaluated beforehand is a very new thing to cubing, as it was new to the chess world in the 1950s when Botvinnik introduced intense chess preparation and methodology that is widely adopted today by all professional chess players. Cubing is still new and the viability of having such preparation is shrugged off as a waste of time, as cubing records are still optimized on fingertricks, lookahead/pattern recognition, TPS and lots of practice.

I attended my first major competition at the Asian Championships in Beijing in 2016. It was an amazing experience, and the major takeaway I had from the tournament was the impact I got from three cubers, who seemed to be on another level: Shivam Bansal, Kaijun Lin, and Gianfranco Huanqui. Kaijun Lin had already inspired me to take up the Roux method as my main solving method, and he had shown how BLD times are brought to such low and consistent times with practice and focus.

Gianfranco Huanqui is a revolutionary BLDer, who has made new kinds of finger tricks and made many new algs which are novel and fluently executable. On the final day of the Asians, Gianfranco Huanqui did over 300 3BLD solves in one day at the venue. I had lost count of the sub-20s, sub-18s he got and it was spectacular to watch him practice. In every solve, he looked at a point where he thought he could have improved, and continued self-learning in this way.

I also remember Shivam Bansal saying a mind-blowing fact after the prize distribution that, our mind is so powerful that we technically should be able to store petabytes worth of information in it which is even more than a supercomputer or a cluster of computer harnesses. By having such brain power the limits of MBLD is unreachable , he said. After the competition, I headed back to Chennai in India, feeling more driven to create something new. The next month (Nov 2016), I finally thought of taking the plunge into making a new method that I had always thought of but never did. I had decided to list out and memorize all the 5 cycle algorithms for 3x3, for both corners and edges, and also get some 4 cycle comms which come handy in finishing off edges in most of the cases and new parity algs. I wanted to make a memory element for each letter quad which could be retrieved doubly faster than 2 letter pairs, and I wanted a 12ish move count finger trick-able 5-cycle algorithm that could solve the case in the fastest time and with very less finger movement.

If I could have mained 3BLD as my main event, I would have never delved into complexities like 5-style. It is only logical to improve your TPS and fingertricks and get more into the flow state when you are maining 3BLD. It was mainly memorizing the dedges on the big cubes on the 4x4 and 5x5, which was becoming a bit difficult, as there are 23 targets, and it was super tough to get the flow with dedge memo and make it stick. I had the idea of if I adopt a system like letter quads, it will help solve the problem of dedge memo not being fluid. My motivation for trying out letter quads in the first place was wings on big cubes. Sometimes there are trash targets, and letter pairs don't stick. If I had been doing only 3BLD, I would have always done letter pairs, and would have found letter quads super unnecessary.

I was attending Shaastra Open 2014, my second ever WCA competition. I was 18 years old at that time and had just finished a 4/8 MBLD attempt which felt quite satisfying. The competition went well, and I came second in 3BLD with a time of 2: 06, behind Kabyanil Talukdar who got a 1:20. After the prize distribution ceremony, Arunachaleswarar, an overzealous skewber, who did blindfolded Skewb solves by insane tracking, saw me doing M U M’ U’ on a 3x3. I showed him that these 4 moves are so efficient that they cycle 5 pieces without affecting the rest of the pieces. He added to me saying that, you should make a whole system out of this idea. I shrugged it off saying it's just too hard as there are many cases, running into over a million unique cases. The same day, earlier I talked to the MBLD winner Vikram Mada who did 6/6 using only single letter memorization (not even letter pairs) and discussed with him conveying how I wish to go beyond letter pairs and go to letter quads. I quickly calculated the number and said a quarter million cases. He said that this just looks impossible, saying that he was already having a tough time transitioning to 480 letter pairs and there I was talking about an algset that runs into a hundred thousand cases. I went back to college and borrowed a big Scrabble book from the library to just see how many 4 letter words exist out there, there were a lot but not enough to cover all the cases of letter quads which can emerge on a 3x3.

TLDR, my cubing journey has been super satisfying. I wish to get WR in MBLD with 5-style one day though.
what do you average in all of the bld events now?
 

ZF slow

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Starting solving on an old rubik's brand, pre rubik's 2.0. Solved casually for first 4 years, maining CFOP but having learned the big 4 and many more. Went up from a rubik's brand to a QiYi Warrior W, to a Valk 3. After about 4yrs was averaging 22 Pandemic hit, got a GAN 354M V1 and swapped to ZZ. Now I'm chilling at 12s. Also picked up a Wrm21 recently.
 
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