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Please answer ASAP: okay I'm learning how to solve 3x3 BLD using the old pochman method and Zane C's tutorial. My question is, how do I keep track of which pieces I've solved? I know how to keep track of the number of ones I've solved using t = u + c, but how do I know WHICH are solved? This is to make sure when I'm breaking into a new cycle, I shoot the buffer to an unsolved piece. Thanks!
 

TDM

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Please answer ASAP: okay I'm learning how to solve 3x3 BLD using the old pochman method and Zane C's tutorial. My question is, how do I keep track of which pieces I've solved? I know how to keep track of the number of ones I've solved using t = u + c, but how do I know WHICH are solved? This is to make sure when I'm breaking into a new cycle, I shoot the buffer to an unsolved piece. Thanks!
I keep my fingers on solved pieces during memo, and I think a lot of other people do this too.

I also remove my hand from a layer if I've memorised all pieces on that layer and I'm starting to run out of fingers. I don't know if this is a common thing to do though.
 

TDM

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My question: Memorizing a 4x4 is the same amount of information that memorizing how many 3x3s?

My guess is 3 cubes.
4x4 = 56 pieces
3x3 = 20 pieces
3* 3x3 = 60 pieces

So yes, about 3 3x3s.

Obviously there's other stuff to remember (different parities, when you're going from one type of piece to the next) but this is just an approximation.
 
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23 + centers
23 x centers
23 wings
11 midges
7 corners
=87 pieces

It is about 5 cubes.
I would guess a little less than that like maybe 4 because I doubt that there will ever be a scramble that will have no pieces solves already. I would say that doing 5 is a good way of preparing for 5BLD.

Might as well throw this one in as well..... What about 6x6+? Up to 17x17 if possible lol jk

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk
 

TDM

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Lots of fast people have all different buffers, I don't think it matters much. I'm sticking with my OP buffer for 3style.
Is there any preference for, say, using a piece on the U layer or one on the D layer? I'm assuming more people use a piece on the R slice, but that could be wrong.

E: found this, which is cool. It says UB corners are used the most (70% of top BLD solvers), which I didn't expect. Guess I'll try lots of buffers in sighted solves and see which works best for me.
 
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My tip on this would be to choose 2 adjacent pieces for buffer pieces (1 edge and 1 corner obviously) and preferably from the U-layer. That makes dealing with parity slightly faster since it is always easy to: 1. setup the last edge (or corner if you execute edges first) target to U-layer 2. Do the correct PLL alg 3. undo setup

For example if you have UB and UBL as buffers then you can leave UBL and UBR swapped if you have parity. Then for your last edge target you can always setup it to some PLL case with 2 or less moves (1 move most of the time) and solve PLL end undo setup
 
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TDM

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My tip on this would be to choose 2 adjacent pieces for buffer pieces (1 edge and 1 corner obviously) and preferably from the U-layer. That makes dealing with parity slightly faster since it is always easy to: 1. setup the last edge (or corner if you execute edges first) target to U-layer 2. Do the correct PLL alg 3. undo setup

For example if you have UB and UBL as buffers then you can leave UBL and UBR swapped if you have parity. Then for your last edge target you can always setup it to some PLL case with 2 or less moves (1 move most of the time) and solve PLL end undo setup
Yes, I was talking about this in IRC yesterday, and decided to do UFR buffer for corners. I was then doing to switch to TuRBo edges, to make the transition to U buffer for 3-style edges easier. Easy to setup to T/J/L from there.
 
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Are there any useful methods for organising your cubes for large multi-blind attempts? (e.g. >20 cubes.)

I remember reading something in a thread years ago that was very useful, but I've forgotten it now. At the moment I just have the idea of putting cubes in groups of four/five putting the cube back in it's original place once it's finished, but I feel like there's a better method (possibly putting the cube to the side or something).

Thank you in advance for any help!
 
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Are there any useful methods for organising your cubes for large multi-blind attempts? (e.g. >20 cubes.)

I remember reading something in a thread years ago that was very useful, but I've forgotten it now. At the moment I just have the idea of putting cubes in groups of four/five putting the cube back in it's original place once it's finished, but I feel like there's a better method (possibly putting the cube to the side or something).

Thank you in advance for any help!
from what I've seen most people organize in groups of 10 (a 2x5 block) and just leave the cube at the side, far away from all the cubes that they haven't solved see one of Berd's videos for why they put the cube as far away as possible
 
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from what I've seen most people organize in groups of 10 (a 2x5 block) and just leave the cube at the side, far away from all the cubes that they haven't solved see one of Berd's videos for why they put the cube as far away as possible
Yeah. I put them in groups of 4. When you have a lot of cubes you're not gonna have time to go back to cubes so I just put them as far away as possible. However that sometimes fails, check out the video on my yt channel [emoji14].
 
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