• Welcome to the Speedsolving.com, home of the web's largest puzzle community!
    You are currently viewing our forum as a guest which gives you limited access to join discussions and access our other features.

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community of 35,000+ people from around the world today!

    If you are already a member, simply login to hide this message and begin participating in the community!

[WR] Oliver Frost 4x4x4 Blindfolded 2:18.65

Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Messages
2,851
Likes
401
Location
London, UK
WCA
2012FROS01
YouTube
OliverFrostBLD
Thread starter #1

Execution starts at 0:37, done at Cuthberts Open 2014. Thank you Chris :)

B2 U2 B2 D L2 U2 B2 R2 L2 U' B U' L2 D' F' L' B2 D' U L' F Uw2 B' R2 L B' Uw2 Fw2 F Uw2 R' F' L' F2 Uw' Rw2 R F2 U B' Fw Uw R F Rw Uw' Rw2 x' y'

z' [memo]
wings - (WSCQHLDBTEAOFNUKRG)(PVJMP) - a WaSp covered in sequins (CQ) "HeLlo!" he starts DaBbing TEa on a pot of mAyOnnaise for FuN. at the UK championships my colleague (RG) is sitting on the PaVement with my flatmate JaMes.
centers - (A,EIMGJNUO)(C,VQ,HR)(DT) - rEceIve a MuG from JaNe full of UnO cards. I see a VentriloQuist for HiRe, but he's really DirTY.
corners - (BDUKJXSB) - "bed" UK "jax" "sob"

[U2 x R:[U, R' D2 R]] // ULF -> UFR -> UBL (11/11)
[R D': U' R' U, L2]] // UFL -> DLF -> RDF (12/23)
[x' U R': [R U' R', D]] // UFL -> RBU -> DBR (12/35) should've been [x': R' D R, U]
[y': [R D2 R', U']] // UFL -> LBD -> UFR (8/43)

[y': [u', r' U' r]] // Ubl -> Ful -> Ruf (8/51)
[U': [l', U' r' U]] // Ubl -> Bru -> Fdl (9/60)
[u: [r U r', u]] // Ubl -> Rbu -> Bul (9/69)
[U r' U', l2] // Ubl -> Dfl -> Bdr (8/77)
U [u': [l', U r2 U']] // set up Ufl to Ubl, Ubl -> Lbu -> Dfr (11/88)
[F': [r U r', u']] U' // Ubl -> Fdr -> Lfu, undo U (11/99)
[y' U: [r, U l' U']] // Ufr -> Ldb -> Ldf (9/108) should've been [U', r' d r]

[x: [U' R2 U, r']] // Dfr -> Bdr -> Rbd (8/116)
[r: [U L' U', r2]] // Dfr -> Ubr -> Lfd (9/125)
[R: [U' r2 U, R']] // Dfr -> Frd -> Drb (9/134)
U 2Lw' U2 r U2 2Lw U2 2Lw' U2 r' U2 2Lw U // Dfr -> Urf -> Ulb (13/147)
[z: [r, U L' U']] // Dfr -> Rfu -> Flu (8/155)
[y: [L2, U r U']] // Dfr -> Ufl -> Bul (8/163)
[3Uw': [U L' U', r]] // Dfr -> Bld -> Luf (10/173)
[l: [r U2 r', D2]] // Dfr -> Fdl -> Dbl (10/183)
[z': [l, U R U']] // Dfr -> Lbu -> Bru (8/191)
[U: [r, U L2 U']] // Dfr -> Rub -> Ldb (9/200)
[x: [U' L' U, r]] // Dfr -> Dlf -> Fur (8/208)
U x l' U2 l' U2 F2 l' F2 r U2 r' U2 l2 x' U' // Dfr <-> Rub (14/222)

222 turns in 1:13 = 3.04 tps

Shame about the slow memo

Having thought about it some more, I am genuinely happy with all of my BLD accomplishments in competition and I feel I have achieved everything I could really want in BLD (not as much as Marcell, but 4x WRs and 13 NRs aren't too shabby.) I will continue to come to competitions when I can, and I will try to contribute to the forums, but I have stopped practicing all events (I said this last time with a nagging thought that my 3BLD and 4BLD times could be improved, which I've done!)

It's been a good run, and I hope to see Linus or Kaijun destroy my times in the near future :) If anyone wants any of my resources they can find them in my signature. Also I'll be starting a blog with articles on Neuroscience, Psychology, my side projects and general stuff which I will start working on asap. If anyone would like to see tutorials/articles on BLD on that blog then I'll consider!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Joined
Dec 8, 2013
Messages
1,017
Likes
39
YouTube
IRNjuggle28
#17
I have a question that sounds a bit silly, but I mean it seriously. Do you recommend investing enough time in BLD to get good at it? A ridiculously high percentage of people who invest a lot of time and energy in BLD appear to just get burnt out on it. They/you seem to have much more of a problem with it than speedsolvers. In your opinion, is BLD too difficult, frustrating, or mentally taxing to be sustainably fun? Daniel Sheppard, Roman, Marcell, now you, and other great solvers that predate my time in the cubing community or that I haven't heard of have simply quit. I'm interested in BLD. It seems to me like something that's a great challenge, and something that I could get good at, but I don't want to do it if I'm likely to destroy my interest in cubing by doing so. I have no qualms about learning to solve a cube blindfolded; that's a pretty small committment, and would be satisfying. But practicing BLD a lot seems different. I've done some mental calculation, and it's exhausting, and the only reason I enjoy it is because I'm decent at it. I can imagine BLD being very similar in that regard. Assuming that I'm correctly interpreting the reasons for a bunch of BLD solvers quitting, do you think it's worth it?
 
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Messages
2,851
Likes
401
Location
London, UK
WCA
2012FROS01
YouTube
OliverFrostBLD
Thread starter #19
I have a question that sounds a bit silly, but I mean it seriously. Do you recommend investing enough time in BLD to get good at it? A ridiculously high percentage of people who invest a lot of time and energy in BLD appear to just get burnt out on it. They/you seem to have much more of a problem with it than speedsolvers. In your opinion, is BLD too difficult, frustrating, or mentally taxing to be sustainably fun? Daniel Sheppard, Roman, Marcell, now you, and other great solvers that predate my time in the cubing community or that I haven't heard of have simply quit. I'm interested in BLD. It seems to me like something that's a great challenge, and something that I could get good at, but I don't want to do it if I'm likely to destroy my interest in cubing by doing so. I have no qualms about learning to solve a cube blindfolded; that's a pretty small committment, and would be satisfying. But practicing BLD a lot seems different. I've done some mental calculation, and it's exhausting, and the only reason I enjoy it is because I'm decent at it. I can imagine BLD being very similar in that regard. Assuming that I'm correctly interpreting the reasons for a bunch of BLD solvers quitting, do you think it's worth it?
I would still recommend big BLD to people, since I enjoyed practicing a lot more when I was getting faster, which is the main thing :) You might also be an exception and continue to love it like Chris Hardwick does, he's a shining example of a top BLDer!

Plus, I don't think it'll destroy your interest in cubing if there are other events to fall back on. One of the reasons I became disheartened was because I wasn't very good at anything else, so when I failed in comp I completely failed. Just have back up goals and work on getting PBs!
 
Top