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Noob trying to judge my progress

Pokerizer

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Well first of thanks for all the knowledge you all share on this forum, between this and badmephistos tutorials I have gotten my 3x3 average down from 5min when I first solved a rubiks cube about a month And a half ago to 1min 6sec. And a best time of 50.9 sec. I'm pretty sure it will be a long road ahead to get to even sub 30's. I currently use the freidrich(hope I spelled that right) method and 2l oll and 2l pll, I'm still working on memorizing the algs. My question is am I about on track for improving my time?
 

Ninja Storm

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It's good that you're working on F2L. Here are some things that I'd try to keep in mind:

-While they may be better for speedcubing, Dayan cubes do not need very accurate turning. If you switch from a Rubik's brand to a Dayan, your turning accuracy will be abysmal, and it will make you suffer in the long run. If you feel like you want a better cube, though, try and mod your Rubik's brand cube. If you don't trust yourself with modding, go with an Alpha V. They have good turning, but aren't world class. They're the intermediate cube of choice.

-At your point, don't worry too much about looking ahead. You should be focusing on being able to perform your F2L algorithms with relative efficiency. You don't need to look up every optimal algorithm, but it may be good to do for some of the longer cases. Try and have your F2L movecount(including the cross) to be around 50-60 moves. From there, you can optimize all cases, although keep in mind that some may have awkward finger tricks. Balance efficiency with comfortable moves.

-It's best to learn the 9 2-Look OLL algorithms before learning more than the basic seven PLLs. After you know those sixteen algorithms, then you can focus on learning full PLL. Try and learn cases in pairs; don't learn J(a) without learning J(b) at the same time.

-You want to start supplying yourself with things you'll need in the future. If you want to go into cubing and try and become world record quality, you'll want a Dremel for modding your cubes, gelatinous lubricant, such as Lubix or Lubicle, as well as Maru or Z-Lube, which perform well, but last for very short intervals. Along with those, it would be best to have boxes for your cubes, a spare Dayan screws/springs sets, cube bags, a Speedstacks timer, as well as a few things that I've probably forgotten. You don't have to get all these at once, but keep in mind that you should definitely look into acquiring these.

-Be active in the community. Don't be afraid to ask questions or go to competitions. Unless you and a friend want to see who can become sub-x faster, you're only racing yourself. Engage cubers, and make friends.

-Try and find a certain event(apart from 3x3) that you enjoy. Personally, I like bigger cubes, as well as OH(One-hand) solving. Some of my friends like Pyraminx, Magic/Master Magic, and 2x2. Try and have a cube for most(if not all) WCA official events, and maybe some unofficial ones as well(more popular ones are the Siamese 3x3s, the 3x3x2, and the Skewb). Learn to solve all the cubes you buy, because it's quite depressing when you have an unsolved puzzle in your box or on your shelf.

-FINGER TRICKS. You can be sub-30 without finger tricks, but almost no one who is sub-20 doesn't use finger tricks. Make sure all your LL(last layer) algorithms are sub-5 right now, with the easier ones being sub-3. As you get faster, make sure you go back and make sure you LL algorithms are getting faster with your F2L.

-Finally, practice. You may not be able to invest as much time now, but every second you get faster is a second for another solve. Dedicate at least 20-30 minutes a day simply solving with no distractions. If you want to continue, go right ahead, but make sure you don't go a day without practicing. Also, don't count out bad times. Every solve reflects your strengths and weaknesses as a cuber, and if you do something incorrect with a solve, use it as a motivator to not make the same mistake again.

That's my little rant. Remember, you have time to improve, so don't push yourself too hard yet. Have fun while you practice, and relax. Don't get too tense about cubing; it's only a hobby. :)
 

Pokerizer

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It's good that you're working on F2L. Here are some things that I'd try to keep in mind:

-While they may be better for speedcubing, Dayan cubes do not need very accurate turning. If you switch from a Rubik's brand to a Dayan, your turning accuracy will be abysmal, and it will make you suffer in the long run. If you feel like you want a better cube, though, try and mod your Rubik's brand cube. If you don't trust yourself with modding, go with an Alpha V. They have good turning, but aren't world class. They're the intermediate cube of choice.

-At your point, don't worry too much about looking ahead. You should be focusing on being able to perform your F2L algorithms with relative efficiency. You don't need to look up every optimal algorithm, but it may be good to do for some of the longer cases. Try and have your F2L movecount(including the cross) to be around 50-60 moves. From there, you can optimize all cases, although keep in mind that some may have awkward finger tricks. Balance efficiency with comfortable moves.

-It's best to learn the 9 2-Look OLL algorithms before learning more than the basic seven PLLs. After you know those sixteen algorithms, then you can focus on learning full PLL. Try and learn cases in pairs; don't learn J(a) without learning J(b) at the same time.

-You want to start supplying yourself with things you'll need in the future. If you want to go into cubing and try and become world record quality, you'll want a Dremel for modding your cubes, gelatinous lubricant, such as Lubix or Lubicle, as well as Maru or Z-Lube, which perform well, but last for very short intervals. Along with those, it would be best to have boxes for your cubes, a spare Dayan screws/springs sets, cube bags, a Speedstacks timer, as well as a few things that I've probably forgotten. You don't have to get all these at once, but keep in mind that you should definitely look into acquiring these.

-Be active in the community. Don't be afraid to ask questions or go to competitions. Unless you and a friend want to see who can become sub-x faster, you're only racing yourself. Engage cubers, and make friends.

-Try and find a certain event(apart from 3x3) that you enjoy. Personally, I like bigger cubes, as well as OH(One-hand) solving. Some of my friends like Pyraminx, Magic/Master Magic, and 2x2. Try and have a cube for most(if not all) WCA official events, and maybe some unofficial ones as well(more popular ones are the Siamese 3x3s, the 3x3x2, and the Skewb). Learn to solve all the cubes you buy, because it's quite depressing when you have an unsolved puzzle in your box or on your shelf.

-FINGER TRICKS. You can be sub-30 without finger tricks, but almost no one who is sub-20 doesn't use finger tricks. Make sure all your LL(last layer) algorithms are sub-5 right now, with the easier ones being sub-3. As you get faster, make sure you go back and make sure you LL algorithms are getting faster with your F2L.

-Finally, practice. You may not be able to invest as much time now, but every second you get faster is a second for another solve. Dedicate at least 20-30 minutes a day simply solving with no distractions. If you want to continue, go right ahead, but make sure you don't go a day without practicing. Also, don't count out bad times. Every solve reflects your strengths and weaknesses as a cuber, and if you do something incorrect with a solve, use it as a motivator to not make the same mistake again.

That's my little rant. Remember, you have time to improve, so don't push yourself too hard yet. Have fun while you practice, and relax. Don't get too tense about cubing; it's only a hobby. :)
Well I did buy a f3 but I'm not sure how I feel about it yet, it seems to feel to ruff turning to me and when I adjust the tension it spits pieces at me if I get it too loose lmao. I also do spend at least 4-5 hours a day cubing at work but I have constant distractions.
 

Carson

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In my opinion:

There is no "how fast should I be improving?"

Many people will tell you that you should be sub 1:00 within a certain amount of time, and that you should be sub :30 so long after, and that you should learn certain steps at certain milestones. The best advice I can give is to ignore anyone that gives you advice such as that. I cube a LOT, and it has taken me almost six years from when I first started solving (4 years from my first competition) to get an official sub :20 average. Others have somehow (and I WISH I could comprehend HOW) reached sub :20 within only a few months.

With that being said, there is a ton of excellent advice here on how and what to practice. Follow some of that advice, don't compare your improvement to that of other cubers, and you will enjoy yourself a whole lot more.
 

Chrisandstuff

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Jan 12, 2012
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Your progressing just fine just remember that everyone excells at different rates. Continue working on your f2l and practice you algorithoms for your ll. Im finally breaking sub 30 and my f2l is purely intuitive no algs memorized at all for it but Im about to look into some of those nasty cases. Like ninja said try to get all your algs execution time to sub 5 or faster. You can join the race to sub 30 thread it gives you a little competiteve feel to get you to work on your times and see how your improving as time goes by.

For your F2L dont worry about looking ahead just get to the point where you feel comfortable with F2L and try to learn how to pair and input your pairs from any side of the cube to minimize rotations this will help you alot later.

But more then anything just keep praciticing man and dont focus so much on your times right now just do some solves and watch and understand what your doing. Youll improve alot faster with practice that is effiecient instead of just trying to solve as fast as possible. While your sitting watching tv you can practice you algs. Practice your F2L alot inputting from different angles whatever. More then anything your F2L is whats going to make the biggest difference in your time. anyway have fun and continue cubing its a lot of fun =)

Race to sub 30 link
 
Last edited:

NoHacer

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A tip for practicing F2l.... if you have a spare cube take the stickers of the last layer. I used an old Dayan and removed all the yellow stickers and the layer adjacent to them so that only the first two layers were left. Then just time how long it takes you to solve that.
 

applemobile

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A tip for practicing F2l.... if you have a spare cube take the stickers of the last layer. I used an old Dayan and removed all the yellow stickers and the layer adjacent to them so that only the first two layers were left. Then just time how long it takes you to solve that.
I would say don't do this. The hardest part of f2l is ignoring all the yellow pieces. There is no point practicing something if it isn't the way you will do it in a solve anyway. Just practice on a normal cube slowly, and never start making a move untill you are certain about what you are going to do
 

sneaklyfox

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FYI: I want your job.
That's a lot of cubing at work. I do a lot of my cubing while nursing my baby. Hey, the colours on the cube are visually stimulating, right? Come to think of it, I'm probably setting him up to become a speedcuber too. He'll be so used to the clickety-clack sound of twisting cube... also think of Pavlov's dog... clickety-clack of cube coupled with the comfort of nursing... when he gets a little older, the mere sound of a cube being turned will be comforting!
 

JasonK

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It may be, but someone at his speed should not be getting a Dayan at all. He should be focusing more on his technique, his "mental" part of solving the cube.
Erm, no. Cubing is just as much about being able to turn the puzzle as it is about anything else. Putting off buying a decent cube is just going to make you more used to turning bad puzzles - which in turn will make it more difficult to learn good fingertricks when you do get a good cube.

Of course it's not necessary to get a good cube straight away, but putting it off because it's 'too advanced' for you is just silly.
 

Idontcareone

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I have only been into speedcubing for maybe 2 years now, and I'm finally seeing times that can give me an average at home of 17 or better. I have yet to go to a competition though haha. Got one this month though so we'll see how I do. But just saying, I'm pretty sure that Feliks was getting ridiculous times pretty much instantaneously. There is really no set time in how fast you should improve. Everyone is different. Just keep at it and you'll get faster and faster with practice.
 

Ninja Storm

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Erm, no. Cubing is just as much about being able to turn the puzzle as it is about anything else. Putting off buying a decent cube is just going to make you more used to turning bad puzzles - which in turn will make it more difficult to learn good fingertricks when you do get a good cube.

Of course it's not necessary to get a good cube straight away, but putting it off because it's 'too advanced' for you is just silly.
I'm not advocating him to have a bad cube. I'm telling him that he shouldn't get a Dayan cube at his level. Having a good Rubik's brand cube or an intermediate cube is all he needs when he averages about a minute. If he has a bad Rubik's brand, he should try and make it a decent cube by breaking it in, sanding it, lubricating it, and modding it.

Also, it's better to develop finger tricks that have accuracy with them. Dayan cubes do not need one to have very accurate turning, so when someone starts cubing on, say, a Guhong, they'll be used to only having to turn as accurately as the Guhong needs. However, if one develops their finger tricks on a Rubik's brand, their turning will be much more accurate.

Rubik's brand cubes can be decent cubes, and at his level, it's all that he needs.
 

Pokerizer

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hahaha Carson I practice 5 to 7 hrs a day but thats because im on summer break but when I have school I only get like 2 to 4 hrs
Yea I'm in a call center on the phone so it leaves my hands free.

I think I'm gonna defiantly order a new cube Tomarrow, I'm not very happy with my Sheng en f3
 

applemobile

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Erm, no. Cubing is just as much about being able to turn the puzzle as it is about anything else. Putting off buying a decent cube is just going to make you more used to turning bad puzzles - which in turn will make it more difficult to learn good fingertricks when you do get a good cube.

Of course it's not necessary to get a good cube straight away, but putting it off because it's 'too advanced' for you is just silly.

Cutting corners is faster than turning accurately.
 
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