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New Easy-to-Understand Fingertrick Notation!

brododragon

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I'm gonna make this as short as possible, because I don't like reading or writing long things. Now that that's out of the way, I can share my idea with you.

There are four parts to this system: Regrips, Moves, and Hand Motions, Rotations

Regrips:
To signal a regrip, you start with R or L for which hand (Right or Left), then, where your thumb should go (the rest of your fingers just go opposite). Put this all in curly brackets. For example, {LF} would mean your should move your Left thumb to the F face (and the rest of your fingers to).

Hand Actions:
A move action is just how you do the move. There are three types:
Pulls:
Just your normal U flick. Put your finger on a cubie and pull to do a pull. Represented with ‘f’ for flick, because ‘p’ is taken.
Pushes:
Put your finger on the same cube as you would a Pull, except, then, push instead of Pull. Represented by ‘p’.
Wrist:
Hold the face you want to turn with all fingers, then twist your hand. ‘w’ has been taken by wide moves, so 'h' for hand is used.
Moves:
Moves are pretty normal, except for three key differences: The prime always goes at the end (right of the motion symbol), and if a different finger (or hand for wrist moves) than usual is used, it is denoted like so: before you even put the move letter, put the number of the finger (or initial of the hand for wrist moves) (Thumb: 1, Index: 2, Middle: 3, Ring: 4, Pinkie: 5, Right Hand: R, Left Hand: L), in parenthesis. Example: (T)Ff' means put your thumb on DFR and pull up to UFR to do an F’. All wrist moves must include (R) or (L) before to denote which hand, except for if you already have denoted the same hand for the same type of wrist move (U, D, F, ect.), in which case your fine without it, kind of like accidentals in music. Also, if a move is compound (two moves that make up one, like R2 r2 = M2) the actual move should be followed by square brackets and the moves (in notation) of how it's done, move by move. Also, similarly to the wrist notation for right or left, if you do the same move, the same way, you don't need to notate it twice.
Here's what it would look like: 2D2[(R)Dwh (4)2Df Dh’]. I know that looks complicated, but the move is also very complicated.

Rotations:
Rotations are notated very similarly to wrist turns. First, you have the actual rotation. Then, only if your hands don't move to homegrip, you use curly brackets and first have which hand is not in home grip (R or L) and where the thumb goes (like the wrist turns). The difference between this and wrist turns is that you can have both hands out of home grip, in which case you add a comma in the curly brackets, and add the other hand's notation. Example: y{RD, LR}. Not sure why you would do something like this, but you can.

The Sexy Move: {RD} Rh Uf Rh' Uf’
First, {RD} means regrip the Right thumb to the D face. Then, the 'h' in Rh means wrist turn (Hand). Then, the 'f' in Uf means a U pull (Flick).The Rh' and Uf' are the same thing except prime. Pretty simple, huh?
If I missed anything, (probably did, it’s 1 AM for me), tell me!
 
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Roman

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Fingertrick notation is something we still don't have a convention for, so I'm glad you've tried your best to make one. There has been good attempts to create a universal fingertrick notation already - see this post.

Keeping things simple is great - however, a conventional fingertrick notation shold be able to describes all possible ways to execute all possible moves in all cubic puzzles. Take a look at this d2:


Can be broken down into these steps:
1) Grip D layer with right hand (or whatever part of the whole hand feels stable enough - I use thumb+middle finger)
2) Make Dw move with whole right hand
3) Make d move with ring finger of the left hand
4) Make D' move with whole right hand

I don't see reasons to introduce a fingertrick notation that can describe some algorithms but not the other.
 
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In the beginning, everybody is confused with the Singmaster notation (the notation we use regularly for 3x3) but they got around it and decided it was the optimal notation for 3x3. I think this is the cases for this fingertrick notation, I'm confused.
Also you have a spelling mistake it is supposed to be "understand" but you wrote "understsnd"
 
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brododragon

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This seems cool - but I don't like the regrip notation because it looks too much like a turn...
I was kind of thinking that too. Maybe right thumb to D could be notated like this: R{D} or this: {RD}? Which one do you like better?
Keeping things simple is great - however, a conventional fingertrick notation shold be able to describes all possible ways to execute all possible moves in all cubic puzzles. Take a look at this d2:
Thank you for finding something that my notation can't do! I was really only thinking of 3x3, when I should've been thinking of all cubic puzzles. I think, that if the move is compound, that the actual move (2D2) should be followed by square brackets and the moves (in notation) of how it's done. Before I write the example, I also want to change two things that'll make it a lot nicer: Change finger notations from initials to numbers, and add Right/Left hand notations (with (R) or (L)) for wrist moves. You don't have to notate the same hand for the same type of wrist move (U, D, F, ect.) kind of like accidentals in music. Here's what it would look like: 2D2[(R)Dwh (4)2Df Dh’]. I know that looks complicated, but it’s a complicated move that took a solid 5 minutes for me to understand through video, so I think it does it’s job well.
I don't see reasons to introduce a fingertrick notation that can describe some algorithms but not the other.
I totally agree. I tried to make it so simple it left out key parts.

Before finalizing most of the changes, I want to see if you guys think they're better.
 
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