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Hired because of cubing?

gymnerd

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Jul 9, 2010
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Having recently graduated with a BS in Computer Science, I've begun the "job" of applying for jobs. Of the people that have contacted me, several have noted Speedcubing in my Extracurricular Activities as a random, positive note that we end up talking about for a few minutes at least.

I was just wondering if anyone else has gained employment with the addition of Speedcubing on their resume and if so, how, if at all, it affected their screening/interview process.

P.S. At least from the limited experience I have with "actual" job recruiters in a technical field, Speedcubing seems to be, if nothing else, something else to identify yourself as a competent candidate amongst the horde of applicants they receive and I would recommend at least placing it on your resume.
 

Bapao

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I was thinking about putting it in my resume to be honest, but I figured "they don't read the hobbies part anyway".
I signed my new job contract with Western Digital 2 weeks ago. During the initial interview, I had to do some knowledge tests in a separate room. I was finished early so I started solving my 4x4x4. When the HR bird came back to pick me up, the cube sparked her interest. I ended up getting the job although I'm not sure if that was because of the cube ;)

So yeah, it might help.
 

stoic

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I would say that anything which makes your CV stand out from the drab mediocrity of the crowd is a bonus.

I used to put on applications that I cultivated bonsai trees...I didn't but at least when I got to the interview I was guaranteed to know at least one of the questions they were going to ask (!)

Whatever you do don't just put "reading, walking swimming" like 99% of the CVs I see
 
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chris410

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Joined
Oct 12, 2009
Messages
394
Having been in the IT field for quite a few years I can tell you that it would be good to list however, do not make that the focus of your resume. The key to landing jobs lies in how well you can interview and tech interview in addition to adding the job description key words into your resume. I am amazed at how many people I see looking for jobs for months at a time using a generic resume. In this day and age you need to tailor your resume to each job you apply for and if called, you should brush up on all of the technology requirements. I typically perform the interviews and tech interviews for my job and the people I give the "pass" to are the ones who can demonstrate balance, learning ability, and good work ethic. Hope this helps!

Good luck!
 

HumanDude

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Mar 8, 2011
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Canada
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2011HUAN02
I'm only 14, but once at a volunteering interview, I was asked what I did for fun. I hesitated, unsure of what impression it might make, then said speedcubing. The interviewer took an old (like, from the 80's) storebought from her bookshelf and said that if I solved it, I was in. I solved it.
 

FatBoyXPC

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In the last two jobs I've had, the cubing topic came up (usually when they ask what I do in my off time, I don't put that on my resume). I'll end up telling them I'm really into the cube and a conversation starts. I'd say it at least made an impression w/these employers.
 

radmin

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Feb 25, 2010
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Columbus, Ohio
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2010HARD02
I put "speedsolving Rubik's cubes" on the last line of my resume in the personal interests category.
My interview was with a manager and 3 developers. They asked about it at the end and I whipped out a 3x3. They asked how long it took and I said 30 seconds. They wanted proof. Yadda yadda yadda, I got the job. (and got to tell my current job to shove it!)

In all fairness I did well in the interview. It's hard to say how much weight the cubing added.
 

Joël

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I think cubing might have helped me to get my current job. I mention speedcubing in my résumé, and usually it will not go unnoticed. In the last job interview I had, the interviewer asked me to show it... The conversation had already gone quite well, and it seemed to be 'icing on the cake' (the absolute proof I am really a nerd :))

I think that it's fine to use your cubing skills to distiguish yourself from others; it's something that helps people remember you. However, we have to be careful. I am more than a cuber, and cubing is just a trick, very much like humping through hoops or card tricks, so there's no point in showing it too much.

Code:
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-|-  Atheist cuber, btw   -|-
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Raffael

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actually i'm looking for a job at the moment as well (i got an university degree in economics) and i mention the cubing at some point in my résumé/motivational writing.(something along these lines: ...speedcubing...blah...blah..blah...comes down to the point where expert practice in breaking down complex problems into apprpriate sub-steps and being efficient throughout solving them helps in many other matters.)

most of the time, the interviewers will find it interesting that i'm into speedcubing and that's it, but just recently i had a interview for a job which very much requires the skill to handle very complex and logic long-term project and the guy interviewing me seemed to be very pleased with my interest in cubing.

so yeah, i'd say cubing certainly makes you stand out from the crowd but after all it really depends on the job you're applying to if it will help you get the job.
 
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Danagon

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Aug 15, 2017
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Amsterdam
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2017KERC01
Interesting how speedsolving.com recommended me this thread even though it has been dead for more than 8 years because cubing is the main reason I got my current job (also as a software developer). Three people or so from this company gave a short presentation about themselves at my university ( I studied computer science until recently) and sponsored drinks afterward.

While attending the drinks with some of my friends I saw that two people from this company were messing with a Rubiks' cube. They had F2L solved but were struggling with the last layer. So I walked up to them and asked them if they could figure it out. They said no and asked me if I wanted to try. I averaged around sub 25 at the time, so the LL took me only about 5 seconds. I handed them the solved cube back and walked away back to my friends.

A couple of minutes later someone touched me on the shoulder (guess who ;) ) and asked me how I did that. This is how we came to talk. About cubing at first and after that about other interests and their company and the work they did. In the end, they asked me if I wanted to visit the office next week to have a look. I went over there next week, did a little programming test among other things, and walked away with a job.

Of course, cubing wasn't the reason I was hired, I still had to be able to do the job, but if it wasn't for cubing they would've never known who I was. Over two years later and I am now working here full-time. If the opportunity is there, always tell people you're cubing. Of course, don't be ashamed of your hobbies, but most people will think it is interesting and even be impressed.
 

speedcubesite

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Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Messages
12
I think some people care. In one interview, they put a scrambled rubik's cube down in front of me trying to see if I'd "take the puzzle apart" to learn how it worked. I guess they were trying to gauge how I handled problems I didn't know how to solve. They didn't know I speed cubed though, so it ended up being a great conversation starter. Also I've been applying a bit lately, and I always include https://github.com/scottbedard/speedcube.site as an example of my work :)
 
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