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[Member Intro] Hello there!

Joined
Sep 2, 2019
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Thread starter #1
Hello,

I am Vincent, living in France, so, please, excuse my English :) ...
I am 50, meaning that I discovered the Cube in the 80s. I came back to it recently, but perhaps because I have a software engineer background, I am more interested into the theory/maths behind the cube rather than into solving it as fast as possible (well, to be honest, I'd like to, but I am not that gifted). I have several books on the Rubik's cube (in French and English and even in Hungarian, but I cannot read it...). I also used to be a twisty puzzle collector but I stopped collecting them a long time ago.
I am currently working on a website to visualize the effect of an algorithm on a cube (with automatic arrows for instance).
Perhaps this has already been done: I saw that there is a large Software section in the forum, so for now I will read it, and hopefully I will post something there when I feel ready.
And obviously I will have a look to the Puzzle Theory section.
Cheers,

Vincent.
 
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Messages
463
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314
Location
Victoria, Australia
#2
Hello,

I am Vincent, living in France, so, please, excuse my English :) ...
I am 50, meaning that I discovered the Cube in the 80s. I came back to it recently, but perhaps because I have a software engineer background, I am more interested into the theory/maths behind the cube rather than into solving it as fast as possible (well, to be honest, I'd like to, but I am not that gifted). I have several books on the Rubik's cube (in French and English and even in Hungarian, but I cannot read it...). I also used to be a twisty puzzle collector but I stopped collecting them a long time ago.
I am currently working on a website to visualize the effect of an algorithm on a cube (with automatic arrows for instance).
Perhaps this has already been done: I saw that there is a large Software section in the forum, so for now I will read it, and hopefully I will post something there when I feel ready.
And obviously I will have a look to the Puzzle Theory section.
Cheers,

Vincent.
Salut! Excuse my French! Ummm... Bien?
How many puzzle have you tried? Just 3x3? I would like to be there first to welcome you to the forums.
 
Joined
Sep 2, 2019
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Thread starter #3
Merci!
I have of course tried the 2x2x2. And the 4x4x4. I have higher orders ones, but never had the courage to try them. The 2x2 Pyraminx was easy but fun. And the void cube also. I have also tried (and failed to solve) the Alexander Star...
But honesly, the 3x3 is my favorite. That's a little bit like ice cream: you can try all the exotic flavors you want, but at the end you come back to vanilla... :D
 
Joined
Aug 28, 2016
Messages
88
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Location
Durban, South Africa
WCA
2017LAWR04
#4
Hey Vincent

Welcome to the forums. Even if you're not interested in competing, consider trying your hand at FMC - fewest moves solving. Besides being an interesting intellectual challenge, your interest in theory will really help compared to many others.

Regardless, consider popping into the Older Cubers Discussions thread. It's always good to see someone who remembers solving the cube when it originally came out.
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2019
Messages
103
Likes
59
#5
Hello,

I am Vincent, living in France, so, please, excuse my English :) ...
I am 50, meaning that I discovered the Cube in the 80s. I came back to it recently, but perhaps because I have a software engineer background, I am more interested into the theory/maths behind the cube rather than into solving it as fast as possible (well, to be honest, I'd like to, but I am not that gifted). I have several books on the Rubik's cube (in French and English and even in Hungarian, but I cannot read it...). I also used to be a twisty puzzle collector but I stopped collecting them a long time ago.
I am currently working on a website to visualize the effect of an algorithm on a cube (with automatic arrows for instance).
Perhaps this has already been done: I saw that there is a large Software section in the forum, so for now I will read it, and hopefully I will post something there when I feel ready.
And obviously I will have a look to the Puzzle Theory section.
Cheers,

Vincent.
Welcome to tge community. I would definitely recommend giving speedsolving a go. You do not have to be "gifted" to solve a cube quickly, anyone can cube.

For someone interested in the inner workings of a cube like yourself, I agree with theos in that solving the cube in the fewest moves would probably be sonething you would be interested in.

Perhaps you will come up with a new speedsolving method and break the world record, who knows?
 
Joined
Sep 2, 2019
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4
Thread starter #6
Thank you all for your warm welcome messages and your recommendations. I will definitively have a look at FMC: all the theories involved seem very interesting.
(And, who knows, I will perhaps also try to improve my solving times :)).
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2017
Messages
186
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63
Location
3141 Rubik's Cube Ave., Somewhere on E_rth
WCA
2019BRUC01
YouTube
WhoCube
#7
Hello,

I am Vincent, living in France, so, please, excuse my English :) ...
I am 50, meaning that I discovered the Cube in the 80s. I came back to it recently, but perhaps because I have a software engineer background, I am more interested into the theory/maths behind the cube rather than into solving it as fast as possible (well, to be honest, I'd like to, but I am not that gifted). I have several books on the Rubik's cube (in French and English and even in Hungarian, but I cannot read it...). I also used to be a twisty puzzle collector but I stopped collecting them a long time ago.
I am currently working on a website to visualize the effect of an algorithm on a cube (with automatic arrows for instance).
Perhaps this has already been done: I saw that there is a large Software section in the forum, so for now I will read it, and hopefully I will post something there when I feel ready.
And obviously I will have a look to the Puzzle Theory section.
Cheers,

Vincent.
Salut! Excuse my French! Ummm... Bien?
How many puzzle have you tried? Just 3x3? I would like to be there first to welcome you to the forums.
I am taking Francais II next semester! :D
(I don't know how to type a cedille)
 
Joined
Sep 2, 2019
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Thread starter #8
I am taking Francais II next semester!
Congrats. Knowing a second language is really valuable. French is not easy I guess for English-speakers. "French II" means that you already attended "French I", right? You can understand "droite", "gauche", "haut", "bas", "anterieure", "posterieure" (which were how the cube faces were named in the very first book I read about Rubik's cube - this book was from Josef Trajberg, by the way, so it was very probably a translation from German).
 
Joined
Sep 2, 2019
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Thread starter #11
Doesn't that mean 'backside'?
The noun "postérieur" means the part of your body you have to put on a chair when you want to sit down, if it was what you meant... :)
The adjective "antérieur"/"postérieur" is what you would use to distinguish the front from the rear paws of an animal, for instance.

je ne parle pas bien le francais
Well, there is no mistake in your sentence at least. Merci pour votre accueil.
 
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