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Fridrich Method

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dRaGoN

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Fridrich method includes, F2L, OLL, and PLL. The whole method is one way to solve the entire cube. F2L just involves putting in the corners/edges as pairs.
 

Yoingtravis

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Is there a tutorial on the rest of it, I can only find the F2L explanation.

I'm new at all this.
 
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use petrus f2l :) or you can just learn efficient algorithms if you're doing it intuitively and you're only worried about move count... but i think intuitive is better
 

notCanada

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^ :)
Greetings Escher!

If that is true, I will make sure to call it CFOP.
Greetings Edward brother, :)
ok, let's ask Guus Razoux Schultz (and other Dutch legends);
Guus, is it true?

Most of this is already known, the rest is incorrect.
Alright Kirjava, :)
could you please be so kind to go into details (if possible with sources);
what is already known (and to whom), what is incorrect?

What is the conclusion? Are cubers going to continue to call CFOP "fridrich method"?
Has the lie already been repeated often enough to have become believed as the truth?

Joseph Goebbels said:
"Eine Lüge muss nur oft genug wiederholt werden. Dann wird sie geglaubt."
 

qqwref

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I agree with Kirjava, everything you've said is either well-known or blatantly incorrect.

Anyway, it is unfortunate but things are not always named after the person who *invented* them, but the person who popularized them. This has nothing to do with America or Fridrich, it's just the way the world works sometimes. Why? Well, the people who invent methods don't always promote them. Sometimes somebody invents something and publish it, but 20 or 50 or 100 years later someone re-invents it and cannot (or does not try to) find the previous published work. Wikipedia has a whole big list of mathematical theorems that are named after someone who was not the first to discover them.

Here's how the history goes in speedsolving: in 2003 people who didn't have all the old 1980s books (many of them weren't even that old) wanted to learn to speedsolve, and a big movement blossomed. So people want to learn a fast method... where do they go? Fridrich had a webpage which was around for many years already, describing how she had a 17 second average (very fast for the time!) and explaining the method with plenty of algorithms. I think Lars Petrus's site was also around at the time, but he didn't claim such fast times, and his LL system was more basic. So people started using Fridrich's method - not the method Fridrich *invented*, but the method Fridrich *used* and explained in great detail. I don't think I remember it explicitly referred to as "the Fridrich method" on the website, but shorthand names like that take hold just because they are shorter. After enough years, of course, it's hard to change the name, and Fridrich is quicker than Treep-Dockhorn anyway, so you'd have a hard time convincing everyone to change. Think about this: even though Treep and Dockhorn invented the method, I don't think it's a stretch to say that Fridrich as a person was far more important to modern cubing. In the first few years her method and website acted as a guide to how to be fast for very many of the early cubers, really the first very advanced tutorial on the web. Your conclusion might be "LOL FRIDRICH IS EVIL FOR HAVING A METHOD NAMED AFTER HER" but I say "Fridrich deserves the name because she contributed more to the method and to modern speedcubing than Treep and Dockhorn did".

This isn't an isolated case, as I've said. Remember Erno Rubik? A handful of other people applied for patents similar to the cube at around the same time. Larry Nichols patented a magnetic 2x2 in 1970 (granted 1972); Frank Fox patented a spherical 3x3, in 1970 (granted 1974); Terutoshi Ishigi independently invented the 3x3 design in the 70s as well and was granted a Japanese patent in 1976. And yet we call it Rubik's Cube, because Rubik's design was the first to be mass-produced, and he got his name on it as a result.
 
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Cride5

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The Wiki already contains hints on this issue:

wiki said:
The Fridrich Method, also CFOP; Cross, F2L, OLL and PLL, was popularized by Jessica Fridrich. It is... [irrelevant stuff removed] ...The fact that the name Fridrich method is used for this method can be discussed. Fridrich was the first to publish and popularize the method although several other people also invented this method at the same time. A 'better' but less used name for this method would simply be the CFOP method.

But I would prefer if it was clearer about exactly which parts were invented by who, and whether perhaps Jessica was the first to combine exactly these steps into a method. To name a method after the first person to publish it on the internet just seems a bit ridiculous to me. Can anyone shed more light on this?

EDIT: Good post qq! So can Fridrich be credited with putting together these steps as a unique combination, or would it be correct to say that she did not invent any of the steps, nor the combination of them. I'd just like to be clear because I think this information should be on the wiki.
 
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qqwref

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I don't think Fridrich invented the steps themselves or their combination. She probably did invent some of the algorithms on her site. What you have to understand, though, is that in 2003 there were maybe a few newsgroups posts, a bunch of 20-year-old books that were (and still are) very hard to find... and then there were the Fridrich and Petrus websites, huge storehouses of information which claimed very fast times for their well-explained methods. Fridrich did also post a lot on the Yahoo speedcubing group in the early years, IIRC. So it's not as simple as "the first to publish the method on the Internet" - the amount of information and help provided by Fridrich and her website in the early years of modern speedcubing seems to be just huge.
 

Owen

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I think corners first was Erno Rubik's original method, but I could be wrong.
 
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