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Easier way to do G perms?

Is this efficient for solves?


  • Total voters
    20
Joined
Sep 22, 2018
Messages
6
Likes
1
Location
Latvia, Riga
WCA
2018KUSN01
Thread starter #1
So I was thinking, and I tested it out. All G perm cases have 1 pair of headlights. If you put the headlights on the left, and do a T perm, the case will now be turned from a G perm into an EPLL. Thinking if this is efficient.... (nope). Still a pretty interesting thing I figured out.

That's the most common way of doing 2-Look PLL. Finding good Algorithms or avoiding them is more efficient and faster

Really? I have completely different algs for 2look pll.

Really? I have completely different algs for 2look pll.
The way I learned it was EPLL-CPLL
But the most common way is CPLL (usually with T and Y)and then EPLL

Screenshot_20180922-174425_Rubik's Cube 3x3x3 OLL  PLL Trainer.jpg

Only 2 algs see

G-perms aren't as bad as everyone says they are. :p

G-perms aren't as bad as everyone says they are. :p
Totally agree. When I was learning PLL in the old days, I thought it was hard until I realized the easy way of memorizing the cases.

Doing a T Perm -> EPLL is easier to learn, but it's less efficient and slower in the long run. The <R, U, D> G-perms are pretty fun actually :p

G-perms aren't as bad as everyone says they are. :p
I literally cannot believe my favourite youtuber of all time has replied to my post.:eek:Back to the topic, G-perms have little to NO triggers in them, and I can only properly learn algs that are:
1. Repetitive
2. Short
3. Have another alg in them
4. Consist mainly of triggers
5. Easy to recognize
6. Flow well (no regrips, fast execution, etc.)
EDIT: 7. MAXIMUM 1 WIDE MOVE

So I was thinking, and I tested it out. All G perm cases have 1 pair of headlights. If you put the headlights on the left, and do a T perm, the case will now be turned from a G perm into an EPLL. Thinking if this is efficient.... (nope). Still a pretty interesting thing I figured out.
For 2-look that works, but it is best to learn good algs for the G perms, which as mentioned aren't that bad. You can find good algs here:
http://algdb.net/puzzle/333/pll
and
https://www.speedsolving.com/wiki/index.php/PLL#G_Permutation_:_a

In the long run it's definitely worth learning them.

I literally cannot believe my favourite youtuber of all time has replied to my post.:eek:Back to the topic, G-perms have little to NO triggers in them, and I can only properly learn algs that are:
1. Repetitive
2. Short
3. Have another alg in them
4. Consist mainly of triggers
5. Easy to recognize
6. Flow well (no regrips, fast execution, etc.)
EDIT: 7. MAXIMUM 1 WIDE MOVE
First off, thanks! :)

I'd recommend changing that mindset though. You definitely can learn algs like that; it's just a matter of practice and getting them in your muscle memory.

Also, G-perms are definitely better than you're making them out to be. Take the Gd-perm for example: (R U R') y' R2 u' R U' R' U R' u R2
The first part is a common trigger. There's one regrip, and the second part is nearly a palindrome and flows extremely well if you finger trick it right. If you just learn the G-perms one at a time, they will be easy to recognize. Don't think of them as G-perms; think of them as one of those PLLs you know. When I was learning full PLL, I didn't learn them all at once; I spread them out among the other PLLs so I'd just learn how to recognize each individual one as a different PLL.

I personally like these ones -


For Gc - sometimes I'm using alternative (headlights on the right) - R2 F2 R U2 R U2 R' F R U R' U' R' F R2

First off, thanks! :)

I'd recommend changing that mindset though. You definitely can learn algs like that; it's just a matter of practice and getting them in your muscle memory.

Also, G-perms are definitely better than you're making them out to be. Take the Gd-perm for example: (R U R') y' R2 u' R U' R' U R' u R2
The first part is a common trigger. There's one regrip, and the second part is nearly a palindrome and flows extremely well if you finger trick it right. If you just learn the G-perms one at a time, they will be easy to recognize. Don't think of them as G-perms; think of them as one of those PLLs you know. When I was learning full PLL, I didn't learn them all at once; I spread them out among the other PLLs so I'd just learn how to recognize each individual one as a different PLL.
Ok that Gd perm alg tho. Now that is good. I also consider R U' R' a trigger, cuz i remember it well and it flows well, so yeah, thanks for the alg DG! I have only one problem. School/homework. Also there is literally no decent Ga perm alg.

All stuff i consider "triggers" is listed here:
R U R' U'
R U R'
R' F R F'
L' U' L U
U' L' U L
U R U' R'
R U' R'
L' U' L
L' U L

superavg.PNG Now that is a quote.
 
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