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DIY Type A III - Review

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Nov 23, 2008
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Thread starter #1
This is going to be a review of the DIY Type A III, not Third Model, which is a different cube entirely although still Type A obviously.
I have decided to post this as there is a lack of reviews on this cube both on YouTube and the forum, even the video from Tox|k neglects it.
As Tox|k did I will judge the cube on its ability to do what Rubik's Cubes do; cut corners, its turning speed and how much it pops.

First of all, this is a cube I have recently received so first impressions should be accurate and truthful. I will compare it to some some other popular types such as the 'Old A' and the 'Type D/Yuga'.

Now that's out the way I can actually start the review.
Initial Impressions
Well, as I received this as a DIY kit my first impressions will be of the cube in pieces, this may very well be relevant as some of you know the Type A III is renowned for its apparent flimsiness. The first thing I did was check the tabs, just to find out what kind of strength they had behind them. To me they seem fine, they appear to be very sturdy and would require quite a bit of force to snap them off. I then noticed the tracks that it had on all of the edge pieces, there wasn't a lot to notice but a slightly raised area of plastic!
So my first impressions were good, if nothing else, it was the best cube I had seen pre-assembly!

Ready to assemble!

Post Assembly, Pre Lubed
Although I would not normally say this, assembly was actually quite difficult. Because the core is made from such a hard plastic the screw did not want to go in and the threads would not grip the plastic, eventually I succeeded although my troubles were not over. Due to the fact that the edges are held in by 'tabs' there was not a lot for them to grip onto the centres with, again I eventually got the cube constructed!
Now for the first turn! Bumpy. I could feel the corners as they moved over the raised tracks, not a massive problem but expected. After a few adjustments I had the cube at a good tension, still I could feel the corners brushing the tracks but this was not an issue; the cube was still fast. As far as the weight of the cube goes it is extremely light, that is no understatement. It is almost literally as light as a Type F! I don't mind the weight so much although it may be a key factor in certain people's cube choice. At this point you may be wondering what these so-called tracks are for, well, from what I can see they definitely reduce the surface area of which rubs against each other during a turn. All good.
I popped in the centre-caps, which seem to hold very well, and stickered up the cube raring to solve! I found that still, the cube was bumpy. It did not cut corners, probably as much as a store-bought, yet was still very fast. I was quite pleased with it pre-lubed but I knew it could only improve, so out came the lubricant!

The Type A III core

Post Lubrication
Yey! Lubrication! As with most cubes the Type A III responded instantly to lubrication and was improved two-fold. I worked the silicone based lubricant in well and wiped off any excess.
The speed of the cube is excellent, it is at par with the Type D although not with the smooth, gliding action. Playing with both I would say the Type A III is easier to control, it seems to let you know when to stop after each turn. The corner cutting was not massively improved, in fact, it still cuts corners at around 50% of what my Original Type A does, unfortunate. The tracks also seem to hinder the cubes ability to cut corners at a larger angle. I think this is also the reason that I find it locks up not frequently but at some points during the solve. The cube due to the fact that it is so light also feels cheap and flimsy. Not to say that it is of course but it remains a fact, despite its flimsiness I would not say it was unstable; it has not popped as of yet and, touch wood, it won't start on me!
The Type A III also has quite a nice M slice, I don't use it at the moment (r2', R2 is what I use) but I might very well start! I have also noticed that it has very rounded 'cubies', again like a Type F. I find it gives a 'friendly' look if that's what a cube could be!

Completed core

Rating
To close this review I will try to add a rating system, this won't conform to anything so I cannot confirm accuracy, just opinion.

Assembly - 4/10
Turning Speed 9/10
Corner Cutting - 3 to 6/10 - Improves massively after breaking in, comparable to most DIYs.
Feel/Feedback - 6/10
Appearance - 8/10
Weight - 2/10
Overall - 7/10

A comparison between the original Type and and A III

Final Comments:
Overall I like this cube, it could definitely improve but for now I like it. It's a very average cube so I wouldn't say I would recommend it, but likewise I wouldn't tell you not to buy it. I feel this cube would suit a certain person, I may try some hybrids but as I say, I am happy for now.

I hope you enjoyed the review, don't forget to post comments and questions. I may add some pictures to the review in the future although that is subject to demand. I have tried to remain positive throughout the review so as to let others gauge their own opinions as accurately as possible.
Thanks for reading.

Updates:
I have read comments and have noticed some people mentioning the apparent flimsiness of the tabs on the edge pieces. I have not experienced this, yes they are breakable but not to an extent that you should worry; especially if you are careful.
My tip to remove or replace the edge pieces without breaking them is that you should obviously turn the top layer 45 degrees and put your thumb underneath the edge piece, but, when levering out the edge push down on the edge and corner directly underneath. This should give the edge a bit more room to move and hence will come out easier and not break.
Again when replacing the edge push down on the edge and corner directly underneath where you are replacing your edge.

3/9/2009 - After a good few months of use I have a sealed opinion on the cube. This is now my main speed cube and currently hold my PB Single with it. The Type A III improves over time, it loosens while breaking in helping greatly with its corner cutting. The side effect is that the cube now occasionally pops, or crumbles. Pieces do not tend to fly out of the cube, more just fall out and ruin the solve. I would now recommend this cube to purchase.

Where to Buy:
Also a topic of conversation is where to buy the cube, currently the Type A III is available from Cube4You, RubikFans and Deal Perfect.
 
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Joined
Dec 24, 2008
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#2
Very good review, this might be helpful for someone. My opinion on this cube:
before lubing my A III was bad cube, it didn't turn well and it didn't cut corners but after i lubed it it turned into really nice cube, now it turns pretty good and it can cut corners very well! I have it tightened and it doesn't do any pops. And about weight, it really feels nice in hand, there's really big difference between this cube and DS.
 
Joined
Nov 23, 2008
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Thread starter #6
I have added a few pictures to satisfy some people's needs, I hope they help gauge what kind of a cube it it. There seems to be a lot of confusion surrounding the latest A models.
 
Last edited:
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Thread starter #16
Bomber said:
Updates:
I have read comments and have noticed some people mentioning the apparent flimsiness of the tabs on the edge pieces. I have not experienced this, yes they are breakable but not to an extent that you should worry; especially if you are careful.
My tip to remove or replace the edge pieces without breaking them is that you should obviously turn the top layer 45 degrees and put your thumb underneath the edge piece, but, when levering out the edge push down on the edge and corner directly underneath. This should give the edge a bit more room to move and hence will come out easier and not break.
Again when replacing the edge push down on the edge and corner directly underneath where you are replacing your edge.

Where to Buy:
Also a topic of conversation is where to buy the cube, currently the Type A III is available from Cube4You and RubikFans. As of 23/02/2009 the appear to be out of stock on both websites.
I have added two extra sections for the perhaps more ignorant readers that inhabit this forum, not to name anyone in particular.

A lot of people have complained about the edges breaking, be careful. That's all it takes.
Also, there has been a dispute totally irrelevant to this thread and review. The Type A III is not available from PuzzleProz, that is the original Type A and is totally different I'll have you know. Have a go at reading the review, it seems long but I have tried to make it fun and interesting to read - even adding pictures.

Finally, I think the lesson for today should be:
"Think before you post, but if you are spontaneous there is always an edit button"
 

Radu

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#17
Good review Bomber. Regarding this cube. Exactly the one from the photos above. A III (black).

I think it's a very good cube and a bit underrated. Your rating regarding he corner cutting is a bit too harsh in my opinion. Most of the cubers and especially beginners look after this ability on a cube and they might be a bit confused here. I think it cuts corner quite decent and I don't see this as a problem. Plus it's smoothness compensates this and as you excellent said: "I would say the Type A III is easier to control, it seems to let you know when to stop after each turn". Which is a pro that is rarely met.

It's speed is great, maybe in the top 3 types of cubes. Only the type F comes to my mind being faster than this one.

And I'm not a great OH cuber at all, but I see this one as an excellent for OH cubing...just try it and decide for yourself.
 
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#18
How did you assemble your screws into your core? I mean, in which order did you put the tiny things on the screw?
 
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#19
You put the big washer, then the spring, then the small washer.

This is my experience with New type A III. I used type D before and upgraded to this cube.

Initially when I first got it I was shocked how cheapo and light this cube is. I took a long time to assemble it, the screws are real tight! Played with centre piece opened to test it out. Absolutely hate it as it is rough and noisy as hell, and pops like crazy. I went back to the type D and suddenly felt how smooth and polish the type D is and like it even more than before.

THEN. I decided enough is enough, a man's got to do what a man's got to do. I checked out a few youtube videos on how to set perfect tension, reassemble and adjust the cube again, lubricate the cube. Not a lot, just spray a bit inside without disassembly, then put on the centre caps. Now let's try again.

It IS much better. Solve a few times with it, did terribly and still beat the type D easily. Initially my lookahead cannot keep up with the speed of the cube, I have to adjust to it. I get used to it more and more. I went back to try the type D, wow it sucks. It feels so heavy and sluggish and cuts corners poorly. I am shocked I cannot use the type D anymore.

Type A III is now my main cube.
 
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