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Cubing theory test

xyzzy

Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2015
Messages
1,585
Eh, nine correct.

(I got #12 wrong, I ignored #1 because I have no freaking clue which G perm is called what, and I think #7 is a bit subjective…)
 

AlphaSheep

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Nov 11, 2014
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Location
Gauteng, South Africa
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2014GRAY03
I got 9/12. The ones I got wrong were #1 and #11 because I don't know which G perm and which N perm is which, and for #7, I think the answer is debatable and depends on the person.

Lastly, #12 isn't about cube theory and the answer will change from time to time.

Some suggestions for more questions:
  • What is God's number for a 3x3x3 in QTM?
    26
  • What is the algorithm (R2 U R2 f2)2 used for?
    3 cycle of edges in BLD or FMC
  • How many symmetries does a 3x3x3 cube have?
    48
 

Spencer131

Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2016
Messages
59
I am a bit upset that the first two are EXTREMELY biased towards CFOP, so anyone who doesn't use CFOP is at a disadvantage.
 
Joined
Sep 19, 2017
Messages
165
Location
India
WCA
2017BAIS01
YouTube
https://www.youtube.
I got 9/12. The ones I got wrong were #1 and #11 because I don't know which G perm and which N perm is which, and for #7, I think the answer is debatable and depends on the person.

Lastly, #12 isn't about cube theory and the answer will change from time to time.

Some suggestions for more questions:
  • What is God's number for a 3x3x3 in QTM?
    26
  • What is the algorithm (R2 U R2 f2)2 used for?
    3 cycle of edges in BLD or FMC
  • How many symmetries does a 3x3x3 cube have?
    48
What does 'QTM' stand for in your first question?
 

Oatch

Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2015
Messages
240
Location
Australia
Now, what's that?
QTM is a metric for, well, counting how many moves a sequence of moves really is. 1 move in QTM is a single quarter turn of one of the outer layers of the cube (so F, B, U, D, R, L). So double/half turns such as R2 count as 2 moves in QTM (compare with HTM (half turn metric) where R2 is counted as one move). Inner layer turns such as M count as 2 moves as an M move can be achieved by performing R and L' and then rotating, which itself is 2 moves. Note rotations in QTM do not count as moves.

In regards to the actual test, personally it appears to be more of a 'cubing trivia' than a 'cubing theory' test. As mentioned before, most of the questions are biased towards CFOP solvers, some of the questions are subjective (e.g. how to get sub-15), and some have nothing to do with actual cubing 'theory' (e.g 2x2 WR). Don't get me wrong, the idea is cool, and could be really great once the idea is fleshed out with some more questions (for instance when I first saw 'cubing theory test' I was low-key expecting things on Group Theory, commutators, etc, but ah well.)
 
Joined
Sep 19, 2017
Messages
165
Location
India
WCA
2017BAIS01
YouTube
https://www.youtube.
QTM is a metric for, well, counting how many moves a sequence of moves really is. 1 move in QTM is a single quarter turn of one of the outer layers of the cube (so F, B, U, D, R, L). So double/half turns such as R2 count as 2 moves in QTM (compare with HTM (half turn metric) where R2 is counted as one move). Inner layer turns such as M count as 2 moves as an M move can be achieved by performing R and L' and then rotating, which itself is 2 moves. Note rotations in QTM do not count as moves.

In regards to the actual test, personally it appears to be more of a 'cubing trivia' than a 'cubing theory' test. As mentioned before, most of the questions are biased towards CFOP solvers, some of the questions are subjective (e.g. how to get sub-15), and some have nothing to do with actual cubing 'theory' (e.g 2x2 WR). Don't get me wrong, the idea is cool, and could be really great once the idea is fleshed out with some more questions (for instance when I first saw 'cubing theory test' I was low-key expecting things on Group Theory, commutators, etc, but ah well.)
Thanks!!!
 
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