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BH algs from ULB buffer

rubiksarlen

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+1 And excuse my ignorance but shouldn't you just learn the different types of 3 cycles and get fluent with those rather than learning algorithms for all cases?

per specials are hard for me, and since they're only 6 of them, i decided to memorize them. other than that, i know other 3-cycle commutators (except for A9s and Colmuns, in which i just do setup+8-move comm).
 

RyanReese09

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lol why so long?

The next month or so I'll be working on learning my edge commutators list (I'm basically done it...almost). I give myself two months for that, because my marathon is in a few weeks, so very little time...4 months left, which I attribute to me being extremely lazy and wanting to practice BLD and get fast (aka get myself some "street cred")
 

macky

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Does anyone else dislike the term 'algos'?
I dislike it. It's an unnatural abbreviation in English because the pronunciation of "algorithm" puts no accent on "go," so that <o> is short (so [O]) (and in fact often reduced to a schwa in fast speech). Writing "algo" makes it seem like the <o> is long.

But in French, for example, "algo" is more natural than "alg."

[edit]
In both languages, it is true that "alg" is not a valid syllable structure (in "algorithm," the g belongs to the second syllable). It probably doesn't feel weird in English because "calque" for example is allowed and because /l/ is velarized and so arguably allows the voiced [g] more naturally. French of course has "calque," but French systematically uses a clear [l], which arguably makes the [g] more unnatural. So "algo," which unlike in English has the same vowel (or at most a slight difference in height) as in "algorithme," sounds better.
 
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irontwig

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In both languages, it is true that "alg" is not a valid syllable structure (in "algorithm," the g belongs to the second syllable). It probably doesn't feel weird in English because "calque" for example is allowed and because /l/ is velarized and so arguably allows the voiced [g] more naturally. French of course has "calque," but French systematically uses a clear [l], which arguably makes the [g] more unnatural. So "algo," which unlike in English has the same vowel (or at most a slight difference in height) as in "algorithme," sounds better.

I really don't like this artificial view of languages. I would say that "alg" is a "valid syllable" because some people use the term "alg". Talking about valid and invalid syllable structures makes more sense in Japanese due to its relatively limited phonetic nature.
 
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