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Another way to view OLL

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Thread starter #1
Looking at Lars Vandenbergh's site at the OLL algorithms,
http://www.cubezone.be/oll.html

I wondered if I could organize the OLL cases in a tabular format which would be more “user friendly”. As I experimented, I made a table which I think organized OLL in such a manner than can actually be helpful for anyone to use and/or to memorize. The best feature about it, as you will see, is that you have an entire different perspective of each OLL case. Instead of thinking of the “H” or “L” patterns, you just interpret each OLL case in terms of corner and edge OLL cases separately.-->all the individual case images become unnecessary.

I have made the colors of the diagrams in black and white so that everyone can print it without it being hard to see (if it is, let me know and I will modify the shades of gray). Besides, not everyone leaves the last layer to be yellow as I tend to do.

I hope everyone likes it. You can comment your opinion on it.

In addition, I include a blank table for one to put his/her custom algorithms. I have also included the set up algorithms for each OLL case and 3 other forms of the table.
 

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#3
This is, frankly, brilliant. And it's exactly how I've thought of PLL when I was learning 1 look (E perm is H and T, for example)
I'll be learning OLL now, I think.
 
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#4
I really like the layout. However, I found that the best way to teach something is to combine similar techniques. Whether its in speedcubing or other hobbies. I've seen it now, that I've stepped away from the cubing world, and have taken up Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

Joel van Noort has done a wonderful thing with his OLL tutorials. Grouping similar turns.

The RUR'U' family. The sune family. Re-insertion of pairs. So on and so forth.

If I was to go to a jiu jitsu seminar, even with my experience, a poor curriculum results in low retention of concepts. Then the Black Belt just got paid to pretty much wow everybody with the hottest tricks. Nobody learned anything, but everybody walked out feeling better about themselves.

If at a seminar, a black belt taught a sick tight armbar, then went onto show a leg lock. Later he said, let me conclude with this wicked blood choke from the mount. This is not a good teaching curriciculum. It is a lot to digest in a few short hours. Out of the 3 techniques, you might remember two the next day, and only a portion of the well defined technique of one of the submissions.

Now I worked with one of our upcoming blue belts last night. I showed him a series from the guard. Where you trap an arm for the overhook. With the opponents hand on the mat, posture broken down, and arm trapped, a lot of submissions open up. Arm lock, shoulder lock, triangle choke, shin choke, and sweeps to take the same submission game from the guard to the mount.

All of the steps are the same until you choose your submission.
He will remember this, because I instilled these things into his brain. Once he has estabished the position, his instinct can show him the opening for the finish. Everything is based off of an overhook. The submission game from this position is the variations.

But there are arm drags, spider guard setups, underhooks. You can accomplish many of the same things from these different positions.

Likewise, you'll learn the sunes. Then you'll see what deep turns do to the cube orientations. You'll see how insertion of the pair affect oll. You can then try inverting cases.

Learning 57 tricks will make learning OLL very hard and tedious. Learning 10 basic cases, with variations.

Firstly, I learned OLL finally by going to Joel's page. Secondly, I'm seeing the same principals of learning by connecting similarities and variations apply to other sports. So good luck, but I very much so like the lay out.
 
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#5
This is also how I learned the concepts of BH. Its amazing how people now look at the way I've taught the system and developed it with Chris. Two years ago our methods were vastly shunned, and viewed as unconventional. Quite overboard and nobody would ever learn it.

We at first compared our methods for blindfolded cubing to the ZBLL of speedcubing. Its more like the F2L. Basic tricks, and easy recognition, relationships between the cubies, all lead to a large set of algorithms being reduced to a small set of concepts. Making the method more manageable.

I feel as though its possible (although difficult) to make a method such as ZBLL a connection of similarities and variations rather than a compilation of the fastest algorithms for each case.

Later,
DB
 

DavidWoner

The Punchmaster
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#8
Interesting way to minimize the number of required images, but it lacks any sort of useful organization. I've always thought they should be grouped in a way that's easiest to learn. For instance:

R' U' F U R U' R' F' R
R U B' U' R' U R B R'
R B' R' U' R U B U' R'
R' F R U R' U' F' U R
should all be grouped together since they are just one alg + inverses and mirrors. They don't really bear any visual resemblance to one another as far as your table is concerned, but they are very similar.

Grouping by inverse/mirror relation is much better, because the algs are much easier to learn that way.
 
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