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Advanced F2L - An Intuitive Case by Case Breakdown - All 42 Cases

Caleb Miller

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Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
7
Hello everyone. I am finally getting around to posting this on the forum.

Earlier this year I created a tutorial series that breaks down every single F2L case and covers all of the various ways to solve each case from every angle. This is all done without any rotations and without any algorithms. This series is for people who want to learn how to solve every angle of every F2L case by understanding how the pieces are moving on the cube instead of memorizing a bunch of algs. This series focuses heavily on understanding what the pieces on the cube are actaully doing.

Each video covers a pair of cases (#5/6 for example - or the oriented and non-oriented versions of a case), how to solve each one without any rotations. The videos also include case recognition, any alternative insertions that may be helpful for a specific case, and how to execute each case efficiently (fingertricks, etc).

It has been out for around 8 months and so far I have received a very positive response on it and would like to see how it stands up to a little more scrutiny from the people of this forum.

Below is the link to the introduction video that discusses the goals of the series, what the series will cover, things to know before getting into the series etc. Feel free to comment with any suggestions or questions on the videos themselves, as I rarely check the responses directly on the forum.

Thank you for your time and I hope this series helps someone out there!


Thanks - Caleb Miller.
 

mark49152

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I watched just one and it was excellent. Good content with clear explanations, and I learned a couple of new things already. Have subscribed and will definitely watch more.
 

latticeman

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Nov 27, 2015
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This is a really nice series of tutorials; just curious to see how it worked out for you in practice. How do you feel that you can manage recognition of all the different algorithms from the different angles at this point? Do you think it was worth the time? This definitely seems like something that I will be watching soon, thanks for all the work you put into it as well as your other videos!
 

sotolf2

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Aug 22, 2016
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I don't really have any insights or anything caleb, I just wanted to thank you for having made all the videos on your channel, I'm still going slowly through them, learning things here and there, not just the algs and the cases that you are doing but how to manage to get algorithms in general into my head. It seems like you and me are learning algorithms in a similar way. I'm very slowly trying to learn pll now, with one algorithm a day, since I'm still quite bad at learning them, they disappear if I don't keep on hitting the case, it doesn't seem like setting up the case first works too well for me, since I then don't recognize it, so it doesn't get into my head. Finally I'm starting to at least recognize which perm I'm supposed to do, I know which perm I should perform here, but I don't know it yet, so I'll do a J-perm and a U-perm and get it over with :p But I'm having fun learning, and I'm really looking forward to learning full OLL now, because I have your series to look learn from. Thank you for all your hard work!
 

Caleb Miller

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Messages
7
I watched just one and it was excellent. Good content with clear explanations, and I learned a couple of new things already. Have subscribed and will definitely watch more.
Thank you very much! I am glad I could help. Happy Cubing!

This is a really nice series of tutorials; just curious to see how it worked out for you in practice. How do you feel that you can manage recognition of all the different algorithms from the different angles at this point? Do you think it was worth the time? This definitely seems like something that I will be watching soon, thanks for all the work you put into it as well as your other videos!
As far as time spent for speed gained at the cube, I feel that if I had just practiced what I knew at the time and tried only to get fast, then I would easily be a sub-15 average, and I am currently around the 22 mark. So for just speed, learning all cases from every angle it probably not the best route to go, initially.

That being said, I feel that if you ever want to get "proper" good at the cube, then you should learn everything you can about it. At this point I can easily manage the recognition of all the algs from all the angles for every case, especially for F2L. OLL I still have a few I have to go back an reference but that is only a case or two at this point. My main goal was to disseminate the knowledge I gained to the community for people that might not have the time and enthusiasm I have for learning how the cube works as opposed to getting faster.

Personally for me it was worth every second (I think it took 150 hours to make the F2L series and around 250 to make the OLL series, so LOTS of seconds) since my main goal is to know as much about the cube as possible instead of being as fast as possible. Speed will come with time and I am in no hurry. The only thing I feel like I lost at this point is time practicing look ahead, and that just comes with practice, but since I know more about the cube this seems like a minor inconvenience.

It really depends on your goals. If it is just to get fast, then learn the requisite 10 or so cases and just practice look ahead and getting fast. Look ahead is by far the hardest skill to learn with the cube so it takes the most practice (IMHO). I honestly feel that this can only get you so far and if someone ever wants to be really good at the cube then the more you know the better. Provided my personal cubing time I will never be a 10 second solver, but I can be a very, very knowledgeable cuber, so it depends on what your priority is.

Sorry for the long winded response but I spent a lot of time thinking about how to answer your questions. For me: it was 100% worth the time to learn the recognition of all the algs from all the angles, but for you it might not be, it really depends on what you want to get out of the cube. This is the beauty of the cube!

Thanks for your comment and am just glad the videos are helping the community, that's the whole point! Happy Cubing :)

I don't really have any insights or anything caleb, I just wanted to thank you for having made all the videos on your channel, I'm still going slowly through them, learning things here and there, not just the algs and the cases that you are doing but how to manage to get algorithms in general into my head. It seems like you and me are learning algorithms in a similar way. I'm very slowly trying to learn pll now, with one algorithm a day, since I'm still quite bad at learning them, they disappear if I don't keep on hitting the case, it doesn't seem like setting up the case first works too well for me, since I then don't recognize it, so it doesn't get into my head. Finally I'm starting to at least recognize which perm I'm supposed to do, I know which perm I should perform here, but I don't know it yet, so I'll do a J-perm and a U-perm and get it over with :p But I'm having fun learning, and I'm really looking forward to learning full OLL now, because I have your series to look learn from. Thank you for all your hard work!
One of the reasons I created the series is because I could not find any videos that presented the data in the way that made sense to me. I figured that if I learned it this way, then there has to be others out there that learn the same way. I am glad that these videos are helping and good luck learning PLL. One bit of advice on PLL, learn the best algs from the start. Xtowncuber just did a very good video on his PLL's and uses a very good list of some of the best (if not the best) algs:

Thanks again for your comment, I really do appreciate it. Happy Cubing!
 
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