• Welcome to the Speedsolving.com, home of the web's largest puzzle community!
    You are currently viewing our forum as a guest which gives you limited access to join discussions and access our other features.

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community of 35,000+ people from around the world today!

    If you are already a member, simply login to hide this message and begin participating in the community!

2x2x2 optimal tables - HTM, QTM, TTM

Renslay

Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2011
Messages
1,716
Location
Hungary
WCA
2005HANT01
YouTube
Visit Channel
I recently wrote an optimal solver in Matlab for the 2x2x2, and tested it with 3 different turn metric. Two of them are familiar, the HTM (half turn metric) and the QTM (quater turn metric), but I experienced a little with an other one, which I named TTM (tri-turn metric).

In HTM, you can do 9 movements in one step (U, U', U2, R, R', R2, F, F', F2).
In QTM, you can do 6 movements in one step (U, U', R, R', F, F').
In TTM, you can do 3 movements in one step (U, R, F).

So in TTM, the graph of the cube is directed, because for a scramble U (1 move), the inverse is U U U (3 moves).
(Note: technically, it is not a metric, because it's lack of symmetry...)

We know the distribution table for HTM and QTM, even the combined of the two:
http://www.jaapsch.net/puzzles/cube2.htm
(For example, there are exactly 12 states where HTM = 7 and QTM = 13)

So, as everybody knows, every cube can be solved with 11 HTM or 14 QTM. But what about TTM? Now, here is the result:

Code:
 0 moves:           1
 1 moves:           3
 2 moves:           9
 3 moves:          27
 4 moves:          78
 5 moves:         216
 6 moves:         583
 7 moves:        1546
 8 moves:        4035
 9 moves:       10320
10 moves:       25824
11 moves:       62832
12 moves:      146322
13 moves:      321876
14 moves:      635632
15 moves:      988788
16 moves:      958176
17 moves:      450280
18 moves:       66420
19 moves:        1192
FUN FACTS:

There is no cube state that is hardest (i.e., it is the further from the solved state) in both three metrics. Moreover, there is no cube state which is hardest in both QTM and TTM metric.

However, there are a few "almost hardest case".

Number of states where HTM = max, QTM = max, TTM = max-1:
60
Such an example is R U' F' R2 U R F2 R' U' R2 U', which has the solutions:
U R2 U R F2 R' U' R2 F U R' (11f*)
U U R U U R' U F' U R' F R U U (14q*)
U U U R R F R U F U F R U U U F U R (18t*)

Number of states where HTM = max, QTM = max-1, TTM = max:
132
Such an example is the Y PLL, like F2 U' R U R F2 R U' R' U R', which has the solutions:
R U' R U R' F2 R' U' R' U F2 (11f*)
R U' R U U F U' F' R' F F R' F (13q*) - well, actually the previous HTM solution is also an optimal QTM solution
U F U F U U R R F U U F U R R R U R R (19t*)

Later maybe I do a 3D matrix filled with bubbles (different radiuses for different amounts) showing the combined distribution table similar the 2D in Jaap's page.
 
Last edited:

rokicki

Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2008
Messages
270
How about U, R, F'?

How about U, R, F2? U, R', F2?

What about U, R2, F2? Does that generate all states?
 

Renslay

Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2011
Messages
1,716
Location
Hungary
WCA
2005HANT01
YouTube
Visit Channel
How about U, R, F'?

How about U, R, F2? U, R', F2?

What about U, R2, F2? Does that generate all states?
Those are much more complicated "metrics". With U,R,F, cube ortations does not affect the length of the solution (if I'm right). But let's see U,R,F'. If I scramble the cube with U, then the solution is U U U if the DBL cubie is fixed. Otherwise, I can say x' F' x is a one move solution, and U,R,F' is equivalent to QTM.

But if we fix the DBL corner, I can say the distributions tomorrow. :)

Technically speaking, your "tri-turn metric" or "TTM" is not a metric.
I know and I edited that note shortly after the post:

(Note: technically, it is not a metric, because it's lack of symmetry...)
 
Last edited:

Renslay

Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2011
Messages
1,716
Location
Hungary
WCA
2005HANT01
YouTube
Visit Channel
How about U, R, F'?

How about U, R, F2? U, R', F2?

What about U, R2, F2? Does that generate all states?
Thanks to your amazing suggestion for reorganizing the code, the runtime is just a few seconds, and I can

give you the answers.

So, all the results here is for pure side rotations, no cube rotation allowed.

(Note that the inverse is denoted by i, so R' = Ri. I was lazy to rewrote the output format of the program.)

Code:
           0           1
           1           3
           2           9
           3          27
           4          78
           5         227
           6         656
           7        1888
           8        5362
           9       14974
          10       41020
          11      109578
          12      277992
          13      627456
          14     1071345
          15     1042187
          16      440512
          17       40740
          18         105
First cube in the table with biggest distance:
U U U R R U Fi Fi U R R Fi Fi U R Fi R Fi (18)

Code:
           0           1
           1           3
           2           8
           3          22
           4          58
           5         151
           6         381
           7         943
           8        2316
           9        5652
          10       13691
          11       32943
          12       78120
          13      180218
          14      392323
          15      748792
          16     1076948
          17      876386
          18      252037
          19       13108
          20          59
First cube in the table with biggest distance:
U F2 U R U U R U F2 R F2 R U F2 U U R U R R (20)

Code:
           0           1
           1           3
           2           8
           3          22
           4          58
           5         152
           6         387
           7         969
           8        2414
           9        6002
          10       14856
          11       36547
          12       88882
          13      210330
          14      466493
          15      885939
          16     1171190
          17      702424
          18       86966
          19         517
First cube in the table with biggest distance:
U U U Ri U F2 U Ri U F2 Ri U Ri U U Ri U Ri Ri (19f)

Code:
     0     1
     1     3
     2     7
     3    16
     4    36
     5    65
     6   120
     7   184
     8   276
     9   400
    10   488
    11   608
    12   652
    13   728
    14   700
    15   580
    16   156
    17    20
Note that this cannot solve every state - actually, this is only 5040 states, which is exactly factorial(7).
Which perfectly makes sense: you cannot rotate corners with <U,R2,F2>, but can permute all the elements. I know that you know it, this is essential in Kociemba's algorithm. So nice try. :) I'm just disappinted in myself - I should have noticed the trick in the first place.
But anyway, nice to see the distribution table.
First cube in the table with biggest (finite) distance:
U U F2 U R2 U R2 U U U R2 U R2 U F2 U U (17f)
 

Stefan

Member
Joined
May 7, 2006
Messages
7,287
WCA
2003POCH01
YouTube
Visit Channel
So, as everybody knows, every cube can be solved with 11 HTM or 14 QTM.
Constructive nitpicking: Unless you mean "11 HTM or 14 QTM or less", I don't know it. There might be cases that can't be solved in exactly 11 HTM or can't be solved in exactly 14 QTM. I suspect 11 HTM is always possible because otherwise the WCA scrambler is flawed, but I don't k... oh wait, actually I do know about QTM. Yeah, there are plenty of cases that can't be solved in exactly 14 QTM. Now what about TTM?
 

Renslay

Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2011
Messages
1,716
Location
Hungary
WCA
2005HANT01
YouTube
Visit Channel
Constructive nitpicking: Unless you mean "11 HTM or 14 QTM or less", I don't know it.
Poor choice of words. I mean 11 HTM or 14 QTM at most.

There might be cases that can't be solved in exactly 11 HTM or can't be solved in exactly 14 QTM. I suspect 11 HTM is always possible because otherwise the WCA scrambler is flawed, but I don't k... oh wait, actually I do know about QTM. Yeah, there are plenty of cases that can't be solved in exactly 14 QTM. Now what about TTM?
Yeah, I know which cases you cannot solve with exactly 14 QTM. :)

I think I can modify my program to aswer the question. Instead of storing the distances in the table, I store a list (for every state). The list contains all the possible "exact distances". In the beginning, every list is empty, except the solved state (distance=0), which has the list {0}
Then the neigbours (distance=1) get {1}
...
for distance = d, I go through the states (which has a list), and add the {list+1} elements to the neigbour's list. For example, in the beginning, solved state has {0}, 2 iterations later will have {0,2} (coming from a neigbour with {1}), and so on.
When I reach 11, I can check which states can be reached (i.e., solved) with 11 HTM.
 

Stefan

Member
Joined
May 7, 2006
Messages
7,287
WCA
2003POCH01
YouTube
Visit Channel
Yeah, I know which cases you cannot solve with exactly 14 QTM. :)
I'm not so sure. Of course all odd parity cases can't be solved in 14 QTM, but can all even parity cases be solved in 14 QTM? Well, depends on how you count:

in the beginning, solved state has {0}, 2 iterations later will have {0,2}
That 2 is only possible if you allow something like U U', which cancels and thus in my opinion should count as zero (btw, writing "two iterations" looks nicer).

Similarly the 11 HTM question: You can reach any 10 HTM case "in 11 moves" by using a 10 HTM generator and "duplicating" some move (e.g. turn U into U' U2) but that doesn't seem right.
 
Last edited:

Renslay

Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2011
Messages
1,716
Location
Hungary
WCA
2005HANT01
YouTube
Visit Channel
That 2 is only possible if you allow something like U U', which cancels and thus in my opinion should count as zero (btw, writing "two iterations" looks nicer).

Similarly the 11 HTM question: You can reach any 10 HTM case by using a 10 HTM generator and "duplicating" some move (e.g. turn U into U' U2) but that doesn't seem right.
Well, that makes the question a bit harder...

And what if I store in a list for every elements the "last move", which caused that element to get into the list?
For example, I have the list for a cube state [C]: {1, 2, 2, 2, 4, 5}, and the corresponding last moves {U, R, U, F2, R, R}.
Then when I'm going to the next neighbour, [D], which is a U neighbour (so: [C] + U = [D], I won't put 1+1 (with U) and 2+1 (with U) into D's list, but I will put 2+1, 4+1 and 5+1 (all with U-s) into D's list.
 
Top