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Interested in puzzles? Join our community

Nearly 30,000 people make up the SpeedSolving.com community from virtually every country in the world. Competitions are organized all over the world, and a full list can be found on the World Cube Association website here. Our forum connects everyone in the world, so why not join?

Interested in learning how to solve a Rubik’s Cube? Interesting in getting faster? Or already a speedsolver and just want to network? Then join us, we’re glad to have you as part of our community.

How fast can people solve the Rubik's Cube?

How fast can people solve the Rubik's Cube?

The current world record single solve is 4.90 seconds, set by Lucas Etter from the USA. The currently average (of 5) for the Rubik’s cube is 6.54 seconds set by Feliks Zemdegs of Australia.

Where did the Rubik's Cube come from?

Where did the Rubik's Cube come from?

The Rubik’s Cube was invented in 1974 by Hungarian professor of architecture, Ernő Rubik. A widespread international interest in the cube began in 1980, which soon developed into a global craze. On June 5, 1982, the first world championship was held in Budapest, Hungary. 19 people competed in the event and the American Minh Thai won with a single solve time of 22.95 seconds. Other notable attendees include Jessica Fridrich and Lars Petrus, two people who would later be influential in the development of solving methods and the speedcubing community. The height of the Rubik’s Cube craze began to fade away after 1983, but with the advent of the Internet, sites relating to speedcubing began to surface. Simultaneously spreading effective speedsolving methods and teaching people new to the cube to solve it for the first time, these sites brought in a new generation of cubers, created a growing international online community, and raised the profile of the art. People prominent in this online community, such as Ron Van Bruchem, Tyson Mao, Chris Hardwick, and Ton Dennenbroek, eventually wanted to meet in person and compete, so twenty years after the first world championship they orchestrated a second one in Toronto in 2003, and another smaller competition in the Netherlands later that same year. This revival of competition sparked a new wave of organized speedcubing events, which include regular national and international competitions.[4] There were twelve competitions in 2004, 58 more from 2005 to 2006, over 100 in 2008, and over 450 in 2014, with more happening every year. There have been seven more World Championships since Budapest’s 1982 competition, which are traditionally held every other year, with the most recent in São Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. This new wave of speedcubing competitions have been and still are organised by the World Cube Association (WCA). (?)

Where can I find all speedcubing world records?

Where can I find all speedcubing world records?

There are currently 18 official events you can compete in at WCA-recognized competitions. You can see a full list of current records here, as well as all official results, competitions, and individual rankings.

There are currently over 1,000,000 posts dating back to 2006 when the community started (read more about the community here). Posts include everything from getting started for beginners, to blindfold cubing, to speedsolving techniques, to forum competitions. Everything cubing related, and growing every day.

It is a friendly community, join us.  It only takes a couple minutes and it’s free! Please read our “start here” page, and then register by clicking the button below:

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