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Next Step After Begginer Square-1 Method

Joined
Feb 12, 2017
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Location
Noblesville, Indiana
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2017MADD03
Thread starter #1
I've been solving square-1 for about 2 weeks now and I am averaging a little over a minute. The method I use is a simple beginners method where I put all edges on top and get cube-shape, then I orient all corners intuitively. Next I orient the edges to solve the white and yellow faces using a couple of algorithms. After that I do parity if i need to and basically repeat and algorithm to solve the rest of the cube. Now here's my question: where do I improve from here? Do I need a new method to learn and how do I learn it? I'm quite lost as most tutorials either teach different things or are way too advanced. Any help would be appreciated.
 
Joined
Sep 26, 2017
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#2
At first you have to decide with which method to continue. The Most Popular Methods are Vandenbergh, Lin and Roux'n Screw.

The following tips are for Vandenbergh as it is the most similar to your beginners method.

Learn the Adjacent Parity Algorithm, then at least one CP and EP case. Steadily expand to full CP and a couple EP cases(for EP use this List or AlgDB) You can start incorporating certain Optimal Cubeshape cases(2, 3 and 7 Slicers) simultaneously with the Scallop-Kite Method.
I can give you resources for everything stated here as well as for the other methods. But I would recommend Lin and even Yau-1 over Screw just so you know
 
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
50
Likes
11
Location
Noblesville, Indiana
WCA
2017MADD03
Thread starter #3
At first you have to decide with which method to continue. The Most Popular Methods are Vandenbergh, Lin and Roux'n Screw.

The following tips are for Vandenbergh as it is the most similar to your beginners method.

Learn the Adjacent Parity Algorithm, then at least one CP and EP case. Steadily expand to full CP and a couple EP cases(for EP use this List or AlgDB) You can start incorporating certain Optimal Cubeshape cases(2, 3 and 7 Slicers) simultaneously with the Scallop-Kite Method.
I can give you resources for everything stated here as well as for the other methods. But I would recommend Lin and even Yau-1 over Screw just so you know
It seems like Lin method is the fastest way to go, however correct me if I am wrong. Do you have any good resources for Lin method?
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2018
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Location
France
WCA
2018ROHA01
YouTube
UCc9ok_ko6mrvJMqx2XK
#4
At first you have to decide with which method to continue. The Most Popular Methods are Vandenbergh, Lin and Roux'n Screw.

The following tips are for Vandenbergh as it is the most similar to your beginners method.

Learn the Adjacent Parity Algorithm, then at least one CP and EP case. Steadily expand to full CP and a couple EP cases(for EP use this List or AlgDB) You can start incorporating certain Optimal Cubeshape cases(2, 3 and 7 Slicers) simultaneously with the Scallop-Kite Method.
I can give you resources for everything stated here as well as for the other methods. But I would recommend Lin and even Yau-1 over Screw just so you know
There are also other methods like Skwuction and Yoyleberry ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 
Joined
Sep 26, 2017
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#5
There are also other methods like Skwuction and Yoyleberry ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
I am very aware of these Methods but if someone asks for a method to get faster, they usually have the intention to learn a speedsolving method instead of methods which have other intentions.

Imagine a beginner asks about 3x3 methods to get faster, I tell this person about CFOP, Roux, Petrus and the like and then you add that Heise and ECE also exist.
Sure, you are technically correct but for the context, the point is missed
 
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