[Help Thread] How to Get Faster using the Fridrich / CFOP Method

Discussion in 'Cubing Help & Questions' started by pcwiz, Aug 31, 2008.

Welcome to the Speedsolving.com. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to join discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community of over 30,000 people, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us and we'll help you get started. We look forward to seeing you on the forums!

Already a member? Login to stop seeing this message.
  1. JustinTimeCuber

    JustinTimeCuber Member

    2,808
    539
    Aug 16, 2014
    Webster Groves, MO
    WCA:
    2013BARK01
    if you learned a method "too early", that just means you have the knowledge with less skill/practice, so I'd recommend practicing
     
  2. AMCuber

    AMCuber Member

    55
    10
    Jun 6, 2017
    Practicing the LBL method, or CFOP? I worked on LBL for something like 2 months befroe I started CFOP.
     
  3. WaffleCuber

    WaffleCuber Member

    25
    1
    Jun 13, 2017
    What are optimal splits for Sub-20 CFOP?
     
  4. JustAnotherGenericCuber

    JustAnotherGenericCuber Member

    249
    143
    Apr 19, 2017
    United States
    WCA:
    2017OSTD02
    Cfop, particularly f2l efficiency and lookahead with slow untimed solves
     
  5. AMCuber

    AMCuber Member

    55
    10
    Jun 6, 2017
    Should I learn F2L intuitivly or should I learn it with algorithms?
     
  6. xyzzy

    xyzzy Member

    660
    262
    Dec 24, 2015
    Learning intuitive F2L can make it easier to remember and identify the cases as they appear, but either is fine, really. (You'd eventually want to learn algs for the harder cases, too.)
     
  7. #CubingForPeace

    #CubingForPeace Member

    47
    8
    Mar 16, 2017
    Kolkata, India
    YouTube:
    Diptoneel De
    Q.How to stop looking at the current pair which I am solving during F2L??How to get every F2L case in muscle memory if I am doing intuitive F2L??:)
     
  8. Cube4Life

    Cube4Life Member

    6
    3
    Jul 3, 2017
    Hi guys. So I'm averaging 23 seconds currently. I've learned full oll and pll. I've learned algorithms for f2l cases that are wierd/ slow.

    When I learned these f2l algs (week or so ago) I hoped that it would take me to sub 20 at least. After no result, I worked on lookahead for these new f2l algs which I was still unfamiliar with. I familiarized myself, only to improve by a measly 2 seconds.

    I feel...Stuck. Idk what i should do now to become sub 20. Work on cross maybe?
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2017
  9. Alex B71

    Alex B71 Member

    58
    30
    Jun 13, 2017
    Lincolnshire, UK
    I've never understood why people learn F2L the algorithmic way. It should be learnt, in my opinion, the way commutators are learnt... Intuitively. Because once have a full understanding of it, it becomes very powerful. Think of it this way, you can sit down and learn 800 algs off a list or you can understand the mechanics behind the algorithm and make your own and then consult other peoples algs to see what's better and then be a part of the accumulative learning process.

    So finally my advice to you is break out of the boundaries you've put yourself in. Try learning a new method, like roux or ZZ, to expand your knowledge. Turn slow and think about what is happening to the cube when you apply these algorithms, it'll teach you alot of tricks regarding Keyhole, Multislotting, Edge control, pair preservation and much more.

    Also, in regards to cross. Try solving it in 8-10 moves every time, any lower is always better, turn slow and track where some later needed pieces are going. Don't worry if when doing these things you become slower at first because you will surely speed up, but i will warn you progression will begin to drastically slow down for you now.
     
  10. Cube4Life

    Cube4Life Member

    6
    3
    Jul 3, 2017
    No, I use intuitive f2l. I only learned algs for cases which gave me trouble. I wouldn't like algorithmic f2l, eithier, and don't understand why people use it either.
     
  11. bren077s

    bren077s Member

    46
    11
    Dec 17, 2015
    I would advise you to record your solves and then analyze them. You will be able to see what takes up the most time and how often you pause.
     
  12. greentgoatgal

    greentgoatgal Member

    302
    52
    Feb 6, 2017
    NC
    YouTube:
    www.youtube.com/channel/UCU1NRjE2T
    Do slow, un-timed solves just to focus on not looking at the pair you're inserting.

    Muscle memory intuitive f2l just took a lot practice for me.
     
  13. DGCubes

    DGCubes Member

    1,429
    813
    Feb 14, 2014
    Over there
    WCA:
    2013GOOD01
    YouTube:
    DGCubes
    Eventually you'll be able to 1-look every case and know exactly what you need to do to solve it. Practice by doing untimed solves and doing each F2L pair blindfolded. If you can do that, then you can start looking ahead to other pairs.
     
  14. Hi guys, I have been cubing for a few years now but only just go into speed cubing. I have learnt f2l, 2 look oll and I am currently learning full pll I was wondering if anybody has and tips to learning/ recognising algs and other useful things to get better. Thanks!!!!
     
  15. greentgoatgal

    greentgoatgal Member

    302
    52
    Feb 6, 2017
    NC
    YouTube:
    www.youtube.com/channel/UCU1NRjE2T
    What I do is I repeat the same alg over and over until I've muscle memorized it and can recognize it quickly.
     
  16. Thanks, I'll try it!
     
  17. This sort of depends on what your current times are. PLL is definitely a great thing to learn, and after that you may want to focus on either F2L lookahead or learning full OLL depending on how fast your F2l already is.
     
  18. Thanks I have sort of started to do some cross and f2l look ahead. I average around 15 seconds with f2l (I know that's bad but I'm working on it) and I'm about half way through learning pll now.
     
  19. Sooooo, I've just finished learning pll and I am sub-20, I've heard that OLL only reduces times by 1 or 2 seconds. Learning it right now doesn't seem like the right decision. F2L is where its at and I am SUPER inconsistent at it. It basically decides if I get a 17 second time or a 22 second time. (Also since I 2 look OLL, Dot cases are TERRIBLE). What do I do??? I'm slow solving, I'm looking ahead. I'm stuckkk
     
    Ordway Persyn likes this.
  20. DGCubes

    DGCubes Member

    1,429
    813
    Feb 14, 2014
    Over there
    WCA:
    2013GOOD01
    YouTube:
    DGCubes
    You're probably right that OLL isn't the most important thing right now, but learning some easy cases never hurts. I always like to have an algset that I'm slowly working on learning in the background. It took me around 2 years to learn full OLL and PLL, but that's because I never really focused on them; I just learned an alg or two whenever I felt like it. Casual alg-learning is pretty nice, especially when the algs eventually add up into something tangible in your solves. :)

    It won't single-handedly save your solves, but edge control is very helpful. Basically, you can influence your OLL case in F2L by orienting LL edges in your last couple pairs. Try experimenting with sledgehammers (R' F R F') as opposed to regular insertions to see how they affect last layer edge orientation.

    You've probably heard this before, but it gave me a new mindset the first time I heard it: never look at the pieces you're solving; always look at the ones you'll solve next. If you know the exact alg for the F2L pair you're about to do and can do it blindfolded, don't look at those two pieces; instead, try to find the next two you'll need.
     
    Ghost Cuber and bananapoopking like this.

Share This Page