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How many groups of methods are there to solve a 3x3?

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2012THIE01
Thread starter #1
So what i meant is that there are plenty of methods which basically are layer by layer.

Then there is all the methods which do corners first (or edges first) like most of the bld methods.

Then there is all of the fmc approaches.

But then there is the question how Roux fits into this...



Thats my view on this. What do you think? How would you group the methods?
 
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#7
Belt Methods count as a group, Reduction Methods, direct Solving Methods,

A guy on the Forum made a couple of Permute first/orient last methods
 
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BrogK888
#11
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Shadowslice
#12
Personally, I don't really place methods into one and only one specific category but prefer to assign each a few labels.

The main ones I use are:
Blocks: eg Petrus, Roux etc
Orient First:eg ZZ, SSC etc
Permute first: this exists but there's not really anything in it tbh (keeping it open just in case)
Corners First: Self explanatory: eg Roux, Waterman, RICE, PCMS etc
Edges First: ZZ, EF
F2L: CFOP, ZB, ZZ
Columns first: PCMS, PEG, PORT, Roux etc
Edges last: Roux, PCMS, some types of SSC
Belt: uh Belt?, SSC
Conjugates: 42, CTLS

There are of course quite a few other you could argue but I think that this way of categorising methods is more useful than simply trying to run around in circles fitting in methods to categories

With that said I would probably go with 5 based on what they do first: blocks, corners first, edges first, orient first and permute first
 
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#13
1. speedsolving methods (which gradually solve the cube, but mess up the unsolved part)
2. blind methods (which leave most of the cube untouched in each step)
3. Human Thistlethwaite (which doesn't solve anything until the very last step, instead the whole cube gets reduced into 'subgroups')

these 3 categories of methods are as different as it gets. And yes, Human Thistlethwaite gets its own category, that's how little it has in common with basically any other method.

A subcategory of speedsolving methods would be methods that pseudo-solve parts of the cube (e.g. Heise where 2x2x1 blocks get formed but not placed in their correct position)
 
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