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3-style learn algorithms?

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Aug 31, 2014
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Thread starter #1
Hi everyone!
I know that there are many topics on this subject but they are pretty old. So, i want to learn 3-style for blind. I understand perfectly the concept and in general, I can solve the cases intuitively but i can't imagine do that blindly. Moreover it takes me time to find the right moves to execute (when you watch Antoine Cantin's videos for instance, he executes the movements without thinking !).
So, how did you learn 3-style? Did you learn the algorithms ? It seems to me that practicing intuitively would be as long as learning the algs (by learning the algs I want to say do each cases and try to understand the algs and do it and do it again).
Thanks four your answers! :)
 

Mike Hughey

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#2
The way I did it was perhaps not the best for ideal speed, but perhaps my approach could be adjusted to make it work for good speed,

I got a list of move-optimal algorithms (since that's what I learned, not speed-optimal, which definitely holds me back), and then started going through them one at a time, trying to figure the commutators out on my own. If I found one that was optimal (which I would verify by looking at the move count for that algorithm in the list), I went ahead and learned it, and since I had figured it out myself, it was more likely to stick, or at least I could figure it out again later more easily since I had already done it before.

Perhaps the better way would be to do something similar - figure out a good algorithm yourself first, and then go to a list of speed-optimal algorithms and try to learn that. If the algorithm is the same or similar, it would stick well, but if not, at least maybe it will be easier to understand the good one based on what you learned figuring out your own. But I obviously didn't do that, so I don't know how well that would work - it's just an idea.

Funny thing about it - I always practiced with my eyes closed, so I find it much easier to perform commutators with my eyes closed than I do while watching the algorithm. If I watch it, I get confused where I am in the algorithm by watching the pieces move. :)
 
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Thanks for your answer! ;)
All right and how did you memorize the different cases (they are too similar ^^ did you have a particular method to avoid confusion?). And how long have you mastered the method?
Haha so I think that I'm going to practice with my eyes closed!
 

Mike Hughey

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#4
I only "memorized" them through repetition - mostly by using them in real solves. I've never been very good at memorizing algorithms. But with commutators, you can get where you can "see" in your head how they work (by tracking the pieces you want to solve), and then you can essentially figure them out again every time you get them. It becomes a lot like intuitive F2L.
 
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