Memory Methods

Discussion in 'Blindsolving Discussion' started by dbeyer, Apr 12, 2007.

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  1. newtonbase

    newtonbase Premium Member

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    A word list will certainly help. Anki is a good method for practicing them. DeeDubb started a thread on audio pairs with some useful tips on switching out tricky letters etc.
    Do you practice tracing? The easier you find that then the more you can concentrate on memo.
     
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  2. Mike Hughey

    Mike Hughey Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I had the same problem with memoing edges with audio. I finally just got past it by memorizing single syllable images for all combinations. It really helped me lots.
     
  3. sqAree

    sqAree Member

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    Memo the first 8 edge targets with audio, and if there are more, just visualize where the sticker is (probably even faster than full audio if you don't forget the visual part of your memo).
     
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  4. theawesomecuber

    theawesomecuber Member

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    Oh believe me, I know :). I've used anki to associate 2200 kanji to keywords and to learn the meaning of nearly 2000 Japanese vocab words, and I plan to use anki to associate letter pairs to images and images to commutators. I just am hesitant to add 400 cards that I might not really need. However, right now the consensus seems to be that a word list would help, so I will heavily consider it.
    What do you mean? Do you just mean going through all the pieces in my edge cycles? Should I be thinking of the letters, but just not memorizing them?
    Hmm, interesting, I'll try this out. I've never really tried visual memory before so I'll be bad, but in the long term this might be really good.

    Thanks everyone!
     
  5. Alex B71

    Alex B71 Member

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    I also have had this problem in the past, Here's what i do now.

    I use a P.A.O system for corners (Can chuck locations in also if it is relevant and strengthens the image) and for edges i always do the first 8 with audio and the last ones (If any) with two fast words that don't need to make much sense, like DGOJ would be DoG OJ (Orange Juice or OJ Simpson). I also memo corner twists as a specific person for each corner and they are displayed a certain way depending on rotation direction, Edge flips are purely visual (I leave my fingers on the flips during the memo and just before dropping the blindfold i "Snapshot" where my fingers were).

    Before i started doing this, about 2 months ago, i would use sentence memo for corners and full audio for edges with flips and twists being visual. My memo splits (according to the times i was getting just before switching) were 10-20 seconds for corners and 20-35 seconds for edges with somewhat poor accuracy, unless i was aiming for accuracy but then i would be going into the higher memo time.

    Looking at today's session data i am getting 7 seconds for corners and 9-13 seconds for edges with some going over these and some going as low as sub-15 memo. But that seems to be the general area. Accuracy also increased quite dramatically a couple of days after switching but that was also the same day i decided to switch parity methods.

    The best thing i like about this is that when i'm doing the first 8 edges i can rehearse the corner memo quite easily at the same time and then when i am doing the last of the edges i can do a quick recall of the first 8 and then finally snapshot any flipped edges.

    I don't know if this ramble helped at all but this is the way i have found that works best for me. P.A.O images for corners mean i can go as fast as i like and not worry about strengthening, but it did take about 2 months to make a full list and their's still some pairs that are not fluent.

    Good luck, man!
     
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  6. theawesomecuber

    theawesomecuber Member

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    I really like your strategy for edges. I think memorizing the first eight letters with audio and the rest with words (that critically, aren't necessarily one syllable, so that I wouldn't have to make a new list), would work very well for me. Or maybe I could do the first 4 targets with words and the rest with audio, I'll have to try them both out.

    This does mean that I need to add more letters to my letter pair list, in order to accommodate the different buffer, which might be problematic. For example, for "X" I am often using "A" when I can't find an image that uses "X", which is fine since my buffer has "A". However, if I implement this, I would have to make sure not to confuse "A" with "X" pretending to be "A", if that makes sense. I mean this is something I'd have to do anyway if I wanted to get into bigger cubes BLD, which I think I will. (quick sidenote: I plan on using a UB buffer for when I switch to 3-style, which has my "A" letter, so this is a short term problem)

    Thanks for ramble and for the luck!
     
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  7. Blindsighted

    Blindsighted Member

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    Not that I would know but....
    UF I think is faster at least that's what fast people say
     
  8. theawesomecuber

    theawesomecuber Member

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    This is completely off topic at this point, but my justification is that the commutators with UB are actually just as good as with UF, and my buffer for corner and my buffer for edge would be right next to each other, allowing for easier setups to 22LL cases if I ever decided to get super super serious about BLD.

    Also, I really like the consistency of having my first letter in my lettering scheme be my buffer, no matter the type of piece.
     
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  9. Mastermind2368

    Mastermind2368 Member

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    I just found this now and am gonna share something that I did, I bet some people might use something like it, but whatever. When I first started BLD, to memo my first edge cycle I would replace the letters with the "1,2,3 1,2,3 drink." In Sia's song, chandelier. Hope it helped someone.
     
  10. Alex B71

    Alex B71 Member

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    Could you elaborate further on that? I have no idea what you mean.
     
  11. Mastermind2368

    Mastermind2368 Member

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    Well I hope that you know the song "Chandelier." If not, then check it out here, <iframe width="500" height="300" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/2vjPBrBU-TM?vq=hd720&amp;iv_load_policy=3&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;theme=light&amp;color=white&amp;autohide=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> . When it says, "1,2,3 1,2,3 drink, I just sing my first edge cycle to the tune of the song when it says "1,2,3 1,2,3 drink, so I might sing, " X, Q, I, H, U, P, T." and have it in my head.
     
  12. Alex B71

    Alex B71 Member

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    Ahhh, i get it now. Making it a rhythmical thing. Yeah that's a useful thing to do aswell.
     
  13. FastCubeMaster

    FastCubeMaster Member

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    I'm not sure if this is good, but I visually memo the first 2 edges then audio the rest.

    Does full audio on edges improve much with practice?
    If so, I might put more time into it
     
  14. newtonbase

    newtonbase Premium Member

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    Yes. It is just working your way around the cube without memoing anything. It helps you identify pieces more quickly.
     
  15. newtonbase

    newtonbase Premium Member

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    Yes. You get quicker at choosing words and you learn more about your weak points such as sounds you may confuse.
     
  16. FastCubeMaster

    FastCubeMaster Member

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    What about just sounding out letters? Do people find it easier choosing words?
     
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  17. newtonbase

    newtonbase Premium Member

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    I assume that you are still talking about pairs. Issues you can have are words sounding similar. For me KT is KaT. It would be easy to recall that as CaT if I didn't have a system that I know (CT is ChaT).
    If you mean sounding out the individual letters then you are doubling the amount you have to recall and it's harder to keep track of parity. Not recommended.
     
  18. FastCubeMaster

    FastCubeMaster Member

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    No, I meant sounding out the individual letters, and I'm curious: why does it double the amount I have to recall? If you just say like "plskatinb" it can sometimes be very fast
     
  19. CyanSandwich

    CyanSandwich Member

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    Sounding out individual letters is twice the amount of syllables to recall. It's definitely slower and makes things harder.

    plskatinb = Pee Ell Ess Kay Ay Tee Eye En Bee
    plskatinb = Pill Seek At In B

    The 2nd one is much faster to encode and recall. But you also shouldn't stick completely to real words. Like you can just pronounce OB and VU how they're spelled.
     
  20. FastCubeMaster

    FastCubeMaster Member

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    Whoops, 'individual' may have been the wrong word for me to use.
    I was meaning sounding out each letter like in a word.
    plskatinb is spelled literally the same as how it's pronounced in what I'm talking about. maybe: "Pl-uh-sk-at-inb" (not seperated for syllables).

    Really, I thought this was how everyone did it and that's what everyone meant when they said audio edges (although I knew audio edges can be done in many different ways).

    I average 1:30-1:40 but I'll try out the words and sounds combination
     

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