Cubing with Anthony: How to Learn PLL/OLL/ZBLL

Discussion in 'How-to's, Guides, etc.' started by Anthony, Feb 22, 2017.

Welcome to the Speedsolving.com. You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to join discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community of over 30,000 people, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us and we'll help you get started. We look forward to seeing you on the forums!

Already a member? Login to stop seeing this message.
  1. Thecuberrr

    Thecuberrr Member

    29
    2
    Jan 5, 2016
    WCA:
    2016LANT01
    YouTube:
    The Cubeitself
    Like this video :)
     
    Anthony likes this.
  2. I plan on learning ZBLL, and have learned some, though most of the 60-70ish cases that I know are just COLLs that I know skip.
    The other cases are mostly T/U 2GLLs and really easy block cases. (eg: Case 13 on algdb.net. It's the standard T->COLL-skip case but with the 2x2 block on the wrong side, so it won't skip EPLL too)
    I found learning the couple cases with 2x2 or 1x1x3 blocks pretty easy, as recognition couldn't be a problem.
    I do think that brute-learning ZBLLs set by set is a good way to do it also though. I hopefully will start doing it that way when I have more free time.

    I only watched the ZBLL part, but great video!

    E: Maybe I'm just blind, but I don't see any ZBLL algorithms on andy's site.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2017
  3. Anthony

    Anthony Professional Speedcuber

    2,236
    44
    Mar 18, 2009
    Texas
    WCA:
    2008SEAR01
    YouTube:
    AnthonyBrooksCubing
    They're on my site. Link in the description.
     
  4. Mastermind2368

    Mastermind2368 Member

    353
    130
    Dec 19, 2016
    Home
    WCA:
    2015FOXC01
    YouTube:
    MASTERMIND2368
    Back when I used CFOP, how I Learned OLL was learning it in a way easy to memo. I uses Badmephisto's algs and I know they are bad, but they are easy to memo because of the way they are sorted. http://badmephisto.com/oll.php. It was so easy for me to learn, I learned them in under 15 days.
     
  5. Juliette Sébastien

    Juliette Sébastien Member

    11
    10
    Aug 14, 2016
    Lyon, France
    WCA:
    2014SEBA01
    YouTube:
    Juliette Sébastien
    The last 3 month, I learned the entire T, U sets and half of the L set of ZBLL, but I went over the cases very quickly without practicing them much, so I forgot some algs and I still have trouble to recognise some of them quickly (which explains why my 3x3 times at my last comp were so bad).
    My next comp (French championship) is in 2 weeks, do you think I should practice them in order to be able to use them offically or just give up for this comp and practice some other events ?
    Note : I also learned OH algs for the cases that have a bad execution for OH, and I actually prefere Jabari's algs for both 3x3 and OH. And this : http://bestsiteever.ru/zbll/ is also a great place to practice ZBLL
     
  6. Anthony

    Anthony Professional Speedcuber

    2,236
    44
    Mar 18, 2009
    Texas
    WCA:
    2008SEAR01
    YouTube:
    AnthonyBrooksCubing
    I'd suggest focusing on one set for the next two weeks (either T or U) so that it's usable in comp. If you try to get it all down in such a short span of time it probably won't go well (speaking from experience... I've had a lot of comps like your last one haha.)
     
  7. efattah

    efattah Member

    275
    175
    Feb 14, 2016
    Anthony is surely the authority on this but I can offer some advice. In the last 12 months I have learned 250 of the 776 LMCF 3x3 set and I have found that slide show drilling is really the best option, hours and hours of drills and very little real solving of cubes. Also I recommend using my Reverse Scrambler utility so you can recognize and solve the cases on a real cube instead of on your computer screen:
    https://www.speedsolving.com/forum/...ng-utility-available-reverse-scrambler.64265/
     
  8. Juliette Sébastien

    Juliette Sébastien Member

    11
    10
    Aug 14, 2016
    Lyon, France
    WCA:
    2014SEBA01
    YouTube:
    Juliette Sébastien
    Thanks to both of you for replying.
    I think I'll actually focus on all cases excepted the last ones I have learnt, the ones with adjacent colors (I don't know how they are called) because the COLL alg is already fast and I find them difficult to recognize. I already have been practicing half of the other cases so I think it will be fine
    Yeah, I do that already with ZBLL trainer but I'll definitely check your utility whenever I'll need it for other algs sets! (although I'm not sure it will work on a Mac)
     
  9. I think I am going to hold back on ZBLL until I average at least sub 10 or 11. My F2L could still use a ton of work :p
     
  10. Luke8

    Luke8 Member

    123
    32
    Feb 21, 2017
    Mars
    WCA:
    2017MYKL01
    It usually takes me about 40-60 minutes to learn one algorithm. Is this bad, and will I become faster? I heard the Chris Olson can learn an algorithm just by seeing someone do it. Will I ever reach this level?
     
  11. AlphaSheep

    AlphaSheep Member

    879
    365
    Nov 11, 2014
    Gauteng, South Africa
    WCA:
    2014GRAY03
    Possibly. I used to struggle with algorithms, but one day it just clicked. It takes me about 2 minutes to learn an algorithm plus it's mirror, inverse and inverse mirror. It takes a whole lot longer to associate the case with the alg, but that's another story.

    With regards to learning algorithms just by seeing someone else do it, I think there are quite a few people who can do that. If someone does the alg slowly once or twice, I can usually follow it and figure it out. It's just a matter of breaking the alg into what it does rather than remembering individual moves.

    All last layer algs by necessity involve breaking F2L in some way, doing something (often just a trigger or two) and then restoring the F2L. If you watch someone do an algorithm, then you just need to note how they break up the F2L and what they do in between. Most of the time, the last few moves to restore F2L are obvious so you don't even need to pay attention to them.
     
    Fábio De'Rose likes this.
  12. Luke8

    Luke8 Member

    123
    32
    Feb 21, 2017
    Mars
    WCA:
    2017MYKL01
    Thanks, that calms me down quit a bit.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2017

Share This Page